General Etiquette > All In A Day's Work

Is there an etiquette for working from home?

<< < (2/5) > >>

sweetonsno:
I work remotely as well. It's tough, tough, tough, and I don't even have a family to take care of! When I'm up against a hundred-odd small assignments to read or thirty-some papers to grade, the laundry becomes fascinating. I realize that I need to scrub out the oven, or the fridge, or both. I decide for some reason that it's a good time to go grocery shopping (again). In short, it's very difficult for me to get anything done with work when I am distracted by my home, and it's tough for me to get home things done when I need to work. (Grading becomes strangely appealing when I realize that I've dropped yet another spoon into the garbage disposal and need to fish it out before I can run it.)

For me, I really, really need to have a space that is for work only. That is the only way that I can really not drive myself nuts trying to balance things. Because I don't have an office set up, I'll usually run to the local library with my laptop. If you're able to take your work somewhere out of the house, that might be a good idea. It will make the line between "work time" and "home time" a lot clearer for you. If that isn't a possibility, then do whatever you can to make "work time" clear at home. Get into your work clothes. Set up your computer and your documents in a corner somewhere so you can't see the state of the house, kick any family members out of the room, and get to it. It might help to set a timer so you are scheduling breaks. Set the timer for half an hour to an hour. When it pings, take a few minutes. Get up, make a cup of tea, pet the cat, make sure the kids aren't dyeing the dog purple, etc. When your break is up, go back to work.

It's a real challenge for some people (I'm one of them). Sometimes, I like the flexibility, but other times, I really wish my home was my sanctuary and a place for relaxation. Being in a space that is devoted to conflicting responsibilities is very challenging for me.

oceanus:
???
OP, I see nothing wrong with your sentence structure.  I don't know what your etiquette question is.

siamesecat2965:

--- Quote from: sweetonsno on February 11, 2013, 05:30:14 AM ---I work remotely as well. It's tough, tough, tough, and I don't even have a family to take care of! When I'm up against a hundred-odd small assignments to read or thirty-some papers to grade, the laundry becomes fascinating. I realize that I need to scrub out the oven, or the fridge, or both. I decide for some reason that it's a good time to go grocery shopping (again). In short, it's very difficult for me to get anything done with work when I am distracted by my home, and it's tough for me to get home things done when I need to work. (Grading becomes strangely appealing when I realize that I've dropped yet another spoon into the garbage disposal and need to fish it out before I can run it.)

For me, I really, really need to have a space that is for work only. That is the only way that I can really not drive myself nuts trying to balance things. Because I don't have an office set up, I'll usually run to the local library with my laptop. If you're able to take your work somewhere out of the house, that might be a good idea. It will make the line between "work time" and "home time" a lot clearer for you. If that isn't a possibility, then do whatever you can to make "work time" clear at home. Get into your work clothes. Set up your computer and your documents in a corner somewhere so you can't see the state of the house, kick any family members out of the room, and get to it. It might help to set a timer so you are scheduling breaks. Set the timer for half an hour to an hour. When it pings, take a few minutes. Get up, make a cup of tea, pet the cat, make sure the kids aren't dyeing the dog purple, etc. When your break is up, go back to work.

It's a real challenge for some people (I'm one of them). Sometimes, I like the flexibility, but other times, I really wish my home was my sanctuary and a place for relaxation. Being in a space that is devoted to conflicting responsibilities is very challenging for me.

--- End quote ---

Iím the same way. Everyone in my group works from home on day a week, except for me. That being said, I do have the flexibility to work from home whenever the weather is bad, or I have something going on I need to be right after work, that may be closer to home, and so on.

I hate it though. Our network has some quirks and some of my applications display so small on my screen its very difficult for me to see, and they canít be changed.  I much prefer my larger monitor and desktop in the office. I tend to get less done when I work from home, since a lot of the time, there are things I can do, and some I canít, so Iím not always as productive as I should be.

But itís a trade off; I donít have to schlep in when the weather is bad, so thatís nice.

Mikayla:
Your issue is about setting boundaries in both places?  The home one I've seen first hand, because my bro and SIL are both realtors and they work out of home.  They also have a non-ending parade of friends and relatives either staying with them or dropping by. 

They actually got one of those clocks stores use that say "be back at 2 PM" or whatever, and when it's on that setting, people know not to interrupt.  And they did have a learning curve in enforcing it.

I'm not sure about work.  If you have set hours and people contact you outside those hours, then can you use Outlook calendar or whatever to let them know when you're available?

I do know that when I did this, I had to draw a pretty strict line between the two.  It didn't work at all if I was trying to do work and help my neighbor with something.  It was a mindset thing.

mandycorn:
I work with a lot of folks who work remotely. Some of them are really good at it and some of them really stink. Here are my tips based on working with the stinkers (which I'm sure you won't be, so all "you"s are general):

If you're on a lot of phone calls, make sure you have a good signal, so you aren't fading in and out. Talk to somebody you're friendly with in the office to establish how being on your cell or home phone changes your volume. I have one co-worker whose home phone is so loud that i have to crank my volume all the way down just to talk to him, but when he's in the office, i have to turn it way up. If you know that about your own phone, you can warn people and/or take steps to address it, like getting hands free set or something.

Along with that, use your mute button whenever possible. If there's a lot of neighborhood noise or pet noise or anything like that, mute so nobody else has to wonder if there's a dog in the office (or be sad because there's no ice cream truck).

Make sure you check your emails frequently; our email system is less than ideal outside of the office, so most people working from home go hours and hours without checking it (it'll log you out without warning, so they don't realize or forget they aren't connected), which is extra irritating if i have a somewhat time sensitive question that I need an answer to.

Make sure everyone at your office has your home/cell contact information. Doesn't matter which you give them, just make sure they have an easy way to reach you.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version