A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. > Time For a Coffee Break!

R U There?

<< < (2/7) > >>

oceanus:

--- Quote ---Are there no friends or family in the area to check up on her?
--- End quote ---

Apparently not; thus the reason for concern.

Luci:

--- Quote from: m2kbug on February 09, 2013, 11:48:17 AM ---Seems a little bit "Big Brother" to me.  I think employing this type of service would rely entirely on the circumstances.  The introverted family member probably really doesn't need their every step and plan monitored.  I would not log onto a website or call some 1-800 service with my plans and I would be really annoyed if I had to answer the phone or log into a website every day just so I can go about living my daily life, and gawd forbid I went out of town for two days and now the sky is falling because I didn't pre-arrange this with 1-800-BIG-BROTHER.

On the other hand, if my personal circumstances put me in a position where I might not be able to get to a phone, or if my aging parents might not be able to get to a phone, an emergency alert type of program would be very useful, especially since I'm out of town from them and cannot drive by and check on them myself.  I think more useful is to wear a remote device to alert emergency services.  I have a house alarm with a remote control and a panic button I can use and keep this close to me at all times.  A medic alert device would useful as well if I needed it.  If the aunt is aging and could use such a service, I would pay for this, but I would not expect her to log into a website or call 1-800.

Are there no friends or family in the area to check up on her?

--- End quote ---

Your second paragraph indicates that you understand the system and the need, but as pointed out by a previous poster, sometimes one can't reach the remote, even if it is on a necklace or bracelet. My dad couldn't if he didn't realize he was having a stroke (as I did and was willing to get help) and didn't press it before the paralysis set in, or if he was knocked unconscious. At least not answering a call a few hours later might save his life.

It's pretty scary in the senior years with multiple health problems.

RE: calling an 800 number to notify of travel: we do that 3 times a year to all three credit card companies when we travel. No biggie. A habit we can continue. Anyway, if our kids take us, they can do it for us!

Firecat:
Is the aunt in the US? If I recall correctly, postal carriers here in the US are trained to look for signs of people in distress (mail piling up when usually it's brought in promptly, etc.) and to engage help if needed. Not that your friend's aunt should rely on that, I just thought it was interesting.

I think the service you describes sounds like a really good idea for people who may be elderly, but who want to maintain their independence. It sounds like it would be worth bringing up to the aunt as something that will give her relatives peace of mind, but not be too intrusive.

m2kbug:

--- Quote from: Luci45 on February 09, 2013, 12:01:07 PM ---
--- Quote from: m2kbug on February 09, 2013, 11:48:17 AM ---
On the other hand, if my personal circumstances put me in a position where I might not be able to get to a phone, or if my aging parents might not be able to get to a phone, an emergency alert type of program would be very useful, especially since I'm out of town from them and cannot drive by and check on them myself.  I think more useful is to wear a remote device to alert emergency services.  I have a house alarm with a remote control and a panic button I can use and keep this close to me at all times.  A medic alert device would useful as well if I needed it.  If the aunt is aging and could use such a service, I would pay for this, but I would not expect her to log into a website or call 1-800.

Are there no friends or family in the area to check up on her?

--- End quote ---

Your second paragraph indicates that you understand the system and the need, but as pointed out by a previous poster, sometimes one can't reach the remote, even if it is on a necklace or bracelet. My dad couldn't if he didn't realize he was having a stroke (as I did and was willing to get help) and didn't press it before the paralysis set in, or if he was knocked unconscious. At least not answering a call a few hours later might save his life.

It's pretty scary in the senior years with multiple health problems.

RE: calling an 800 number to notify of travel: we do that 3 times a year to all three credit card companies when we travel. No biggie. A habit we can continue. Anyway, if our kids take us, they can do it for us!

--- End quote ---

I completely agree.  My grandparents lived in a retirement community with nursing on staff.  If they didn't answer the phone, a simple phone call to RetirementLand had someone knocking on the door or even "breaking in."  Not everyone has this luxury or service available, and my parents are not living in this type of community, so what do I do if they are at a point in life where we need a daily check-in, in person?  I realize a panic button isn't always the best resource.  What I read from the OP's post is that this aunt is largely introverted and functional but aging, so no contact could be detrimental, but is also very normal...what to do?  How to go about care for her?  If she is functional, this type of service is intrusive.  If she is aging and could use a "check in" type of program, I think this type of service could be very useful, but I would not expect her to log into a website or call 1-800 with every plan.

Jocelyn:

--- Quote from: m2kbug on February 09, 2013, 11:48:17 AM ---Seems a little bit "Big Brother" to me.  I think employing this type of service would rely entirely on the circumstances.  The introverted family member probably really doesn't need their every step and plan monitored.  I would not log onto a website or call some 1-800 service with my plans and I would be really annoyed if I had to answer the phone or log into a website every day just so I can go about living my daily life, and gawd forbid I went out of town for two days and now the sky is falling because I didn't pre-arrange this with 1-800-BIG-BROTHER.

--- End quote ---
My parents are in their 90s. We actually had to pull them out of an assisted living facility because mom became too afraid that the nurses would not come and help her if she called for them. Now my sister lives with them, and she's much better.
I remember how when I was in my 20s, the 'I've fallen and I can't get up' commercials were hilarious. I'm not elderly yet, but I can see it from here.  ::) A couple of weeks ago, I injured my foot, and I really thought twice about going to the basement to do laundry, because what if my foot gave out and I fell down the stairs? Unlocking the front door and taking my cell phone with me resolved that anxiety, but it does concern me about what might happen after I retire, and there's no co-workers to notice if I don't show up for work. A lot of us live in fairly anonymous neighborhoods where we don't know our neighbors schedules, or aren't there to notice if someone leaves for work or not.
Just saying that for elderly people, it may not feel like Big Brother to have a cheerful voice call every morning while you're working the crossword puzzle over coffee, and inquire how you're doing.  A lot of fearful situations- falls, home invasion, sickness- become less fearful if you know that help will arrive by 9:30 if you don't answer at 9. Yes, it would be great if family members would call- but if you don't live locally, what do you do if Aunt Emma doesn't answer? Will the cops take it seriously if you call them and tell them she doesn't answer her phone and you want a welfare check done- or will they take it more seriously if a professional service is calling, especially if it has workers that can be sent out, and they're calling from the house and saying they can't get a response? While Mom and Dad were living by themselves, we relied on Meals on Wheels to report if they got there and no one answered...but a driver in a hurry who assumed that they were just in the bathroom could bring that system to a halt. Mom and Dad loved their MoW drivers, and looked forward to seeing George on Thursday. :) They really liked to have a few minutes conversation with someone else during the day.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version