Author Topic: Things you wish you never saw . . . please see Post #46, pg. 4, before posting  (Read 7187 times)

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Diane AKA Traska

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We were discussing dogs and cats as pets yesterday at lunch.  I was the only cat owner at the table; everyone else were dog people.  One of my coworkers said, 'If you die at home, your dog will guard your body.  Your cat will eat your face.'  I just shrugged and said, 'What do I care?  I'll be dead.'
"...the dog will guard your body..."  until food runs out!
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Amava

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We were discussing dogs and cats as pets yesterday at lunch.  I was the only cat owner at the table; everyone else were dog people.  One of my coworkers said, 'If you die at home, your dog will guard your body.  Your cat will eat your face.'  I just shrugged and said, 'What do I care?  I'll be dead.'
And as much as I love dogs, your coworker is dead wrong.

ladyknight1

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As an acquaintance of mine found out, her neighbor had died (suicide) and was not found for a month. His dog now belongs to her.

Shalamar

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I confess to a certain love for the Saw movies.  I have to tell you - you'll never consider them as gross or creepy again after you've watched some of the DVD extras.  The technicians who come up with all of Jigsaw's stunts are so darned happy and enthusiastic about their work, and it's kind of cute in a weird way.   "This is really gross!  But could we make it even grosser if we did (blah)?"  "That's awesome, man!  Let's do it!"  *high five*

ladyknight1

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Our young male receptionist has saggy pants today. It cannot be unseen.  :-\

bansidhe

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Roadkill sometimes really gets to me too, and I always remind myself of what my mom used to say when my sister and I were little and all three of us were out in the car and we saw roadkill that upset all three of us. 

I won't quote the whole thing here, but your mom is right. That's a good though to keep in mind.

I have a long commute in to work through a mostly rural area with loads of wildlife, so seeing roadkill is unfortunately a nearly daily occurrence. In fact, while driving in today with my neighbor, we saw a large jackrabbit who'd been killed on the road and I said to my neighbor what I always tell myself: at least now the vultures and other scavenging animals won't go hungry.
Esan ozenki!

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Arrynne

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On a lighter note, I have seen multiple fashion choices today that I wish I had not seen.

1. A woman with cherry red pants that have yellow and green plaid, a green shirt and a yellow jacket. It was like a crayon box exploded. (Gas station)
2. A woman in orange stretch pants, with brown boots and a red jacket. (grocery store)
3. A woman with an orange crop top, the bottom of which was tucked under her bra, extremely elaborate navel jewelry (5" chandelier), and a sheer black skirt that was mini length in the front and floor length in the back. (grocery store)

Great, now I'm curious about the navel jewellery, but afraid of what Google will show me.  :)

Arrynne

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We have a saying for when this happens, "My eyes, my eyes!/Your eyes, your eyes!" One morning we knocked on my FIL's hotel room door and he answered in his birthday suit. We both said it to each other that time.

I love my father-in-law to pieces, but that is an image that I hope I -never- have to see.

Shalamar

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My dad tends to walk around in his tighty-whiteys all the time when he's getting ready to start the day - including in front of me, my husband, and our kids.  He's 70.  Meep.

Outdoor Girl

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My Dad stayed with me before and after he had his hip replacement.  The night before his surgery, he was trying to have a shower (which they recommend because you shouldn't shower until the staples are pulled out after surgery) and fell in my bathtub.  I had to help him out.  Talk about things you never want to see!  (He was OK - his shoulder hurt a bit but the surgery was able to go on as planned.)

I had to change his dressing once, too.  I got him to put on his underwear on the good side and hold it over the parts I didn't want to see.  That was much easier, but still on the border of 'I really don't want to see this.'
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
Ontario

Diane AKA Traska

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My dad tends to walk around in his tighty-whiteys all the time when he's getting ready to start the day - including in front of me, my husband, and our kids.  He's 70.  Meep.

"Dad!  It's called UNDERWEAR because you WEAR it UNDER!!"
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CrochetFanatic

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My dad tends to walk around in his tighty-whiteys all the time when he's getting ready to start the day - including in front of me, my husband, and our kids.  He's 70.  Meep.

"Dad!  It's called UNDERWEAR because you WEAR it UNDER!!"

I know some smart-alecks who would respond to that by going back to the bedroom or bathroom and coming out wearing their pants with their underwear on the outside, get their coffee, then head back in to change properly.  ::)  Something similar actually happened during summer camp, and we threw our pillows at her.

EMuir

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My spouse works at a building that has floor to ceiling windows on the ground floor.  There are blinds that can go all the way to the floor but are usually pulled down to about waist level of a standing person.  In the wintertime when I dropped my spouse off early at work one day, it was still dark outside but the office was lit. 

Her boss was changing clothes in his office, and since he couldn't see outside, assumed nobody would see inside.  We were, admittedly, sitting low in a vehicle too.  But we saw far more than we wanted to before we realized what was going on. 

I visited rotten.com one time and saw a pic of someone hit by a train.  At the time I was still thinking "oh they can't post REALLY bad images can they?"  Yes, yes they can.

I stopped to pick a roadkill cat off of a road in the city.  It was still warm and I was trying to see if it was alive, so I touched its eyes, which were wide open with blood trailing from its mouth.  I wish I could forget that.

Sluggyfan

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Pro Ana sites. I ran into one of those long ago, and the "helpful tips" these people gave each other, along with the justification and encouragement, still sticks with me.

A friend of mine has a brother who is somewhat deranged, and he once posted an old pic from a catalog of terrible accidents that had a child's arm stuck up to his shoulder in a meat grinder. Yes, there was meat coming out of the grinder, and the child was obviously passed out. You know that thing where you get all trembly and weak because you can imagine the pain of someone else? Even a flicker of that image on the edge of my memory gives me that sensation. I'd delete it from my brain if I could.

Oh, and I wish I never saw the movie Cropsey. It started out interesting and creepy and slowly devolved into something depressing and unnerving and terrible. For those who haven't seen, the documentary creators set out to find the origins of a Staten Island urban legend they grew up with about a boogyman creature that steals and murders children. Slowly they uncover that this legend probably popped up from a set of real crimes involving a man who kidnapped, raped and killed mentally challenged kids on Staten Island. He also squatted in an old, abandoned asylum (which has a pretty nasty history of its own, and now looks like something straight out of a horror flick).  Eventually they contact the murderer, who is now doing time, and he's all sorts of crazy. It was terribly sad and awful and there seemed to be no point to the story besides finding out that sometimes urban legends are created from real tragedies.



padua

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i'm working as a substance abuse counselor now and heard about a new synthentic drug that's being used in russia. a friend of mine saw his first case on the east coast, so i looked it up. krokodil. it essentially rots the flesh off the body, so the abuser looks like a living zombie. mortality rate is horrifying. the images are very disturbing.

i also saw a clip in the news ( i believe it's now on youtube) of a woman who suspected her nanny of childabuse. she set up a nannycam and saw the nanny pick her baby up by an arm and a leg and fling him across the room all because he brought her a ball to throw. i can't remember the last time i cried so hard. in fact, i felt nausious for days thinking about it. on the other hand, i learned you can't trust everyone, even if they're supposedly trained to care for your little ones.

i imagine my husband saw all sorts of horrible 'wish i could unsee that' things when i was giving birth. thank goodness i was on the other end of it!