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  • October 01, 2016, 04:15:40 PM

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Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 8348473 times)

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Outdoor Girl

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #35940 on: Yesterday at 11:57:22 AM »
People who think that red lights don't apply to them.

Yesterday, I was turning off of a side road onto to a four lane road (the main drag in our smallish town) and I had a protected green arrow. The person coming from the opposite direction had his turn signal on indicating he was turning right, (so same direction as me) however I had the right of way because of the green arrow. Or so I thought (insert eyeroll). As I was about 1/3 of the way into the turn, he pulled into intersection. I stopped and honked my horn. He stopped and I proceeded to go again and so did he. I honked the horn again, a little bit more forcefully and he stopped again. I began to move again and needed to be in the far right lane, but before I could get into that lane, he was there, right in my blind spot and I had to quickly correct myself to avoid hitting him.

I'm pretty sure that because I had the protected green, either of the lanes on the road I was turning onto were mine for the picking and the other traffic had to stop, but maybe I was wrong?

If I have this correct, you were turning left, on a left turn arrow, and he was turning right on a red?  You had the right of way.  You turned into the left lane, which was closest to you and therefore correct, then tried to move to the right for the lane you needed.  He should have waited for you.

We now have a highway off ramp that has two lanes turning left and two lanes turning right.  The law says that you turn into the corresponding lane.  So if you are in the far right lane on the ramp, you turn into the far right lane on the road.  There are a couple of left turns right after you get on the road that a lot of people take, including me.  So I always line up in the second from the right lane on the ramp and turn into the second from the right lane on the road, then signal and move one more lane to the left so I can get to the turn I need.  Almost every time I go through this intersection, someone tries to cut from the far right lane to the left, through me, and gives me the dirtiest look when I honk at them so they avoid running into me.  I fully expect to get t-boned there one of these days.  But unfortunately, I can't avoid the intersection or I would.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

mumma to KMC

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #35941 on: Yesterday at 02:33:49 PM »
People who think that red lights don't apply to them.

Yesterday, I was turning off of a side road onto to a four lane road (the main drag in our smallish town) and I had a protected green arrow. The person coming from the opposite direction had his turn signal on indicating he was turning right, (so same direction as me) however I had the right of way because of the green arrow. Or so I thought (insert eyeroll). As I was about 1/3 of the way into the turn, he pulled into intersection. I stopped and honked my horn. He stopped and I proceeded to go again and so did he. I honked the horn again, a little bit more forcefully and he stopped again. I began to move again and needed to be in the far right lane, but before I could get into that lane, he was there, right in my blind spot and I had to quickly correct myself to avoid hitting him.

I'm pretty sure that because I had the protected green, either of the lanes on the road I was turning onto were mine for the picking and the other traffic had to stop, but maybe I was wrong?

If I have this correct, you were turning left, on a left turn arrow, and he was turning right?  You had the right of way.  You turned into the left lane, which was closest to you and therefore correct, then tried to move to the right for the lane you needed.  He should have waited for you.

We now have a highway off ramp that has two lanes turning left and two lanes turning right.  The law says that you turn into the corresponding lane.  So if you are in the far right lane on the ramp, you turn into the far right lane on the road.  There are a couple of left turns right after you get on the road that a lot of people take, including me.  So I always line up in the second from the right lane on the ramp and turn into the second from the right lane on the road, then signal and move one more lane to the left so I can get to the turn I need.  Almost every time I go through this intersection, someone tries to cut from the far right lane to the left, through me, and gives me the dirtiest look when I honk at them so they avoid running into me.  I fully expect to get t-boned there one of these days.  But unfortunately, I can't avoid the intersection or I would.

Yes, that's what happened. Thank you for explaining it more clearly than I did!

My husband had a story about driving with a co-worker the other day. He was in a car with two other co-workers and one of them (we'll call him Bob) was driving. Bob wanted to turn right and the car in front of them was turning left. Bob didn't want to wait, so he pulled up next to the car to make his turn.

It was a two lane road with no turn lanes. My husband mentioned this and his coworker was confused as to what he had done wrong.

RainyDays

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #35942 on: Yesterday at 05:36:46 PM »
People who think that red lights don't apply to them.

Yesterday, I was turning off of a side road onto to a four lane road (the main drag in our smallish town) and I had a protected green arrow. The person coming from the opposite direction had his turn signal on indicating he was turning right, (so same direction as me) however I had the right of way because of the green arrow. Or so I thought (insert eyeroll). As I was about 1/3 of the way into the turn, he pulled into intersection. I stopped and honked my horn. He stopped and I proceeded to go again and so did he. I honked the horn again, a little bit more forcefully and he stopped again. I began to move again and needed to be in the far right lane, but before I could get into that lane, he was there, right in my blind spot and I had to quickly correct myself to avoid hitting him.

I'm pretty sure that because I had the protected green, either of the lanes on the road I was turning onto were mine for the picking and the other traffic had to stop, but maybe I was wrong?

If I have this correct, you were turning left, on a left turn arrow, and he was turning right?  You had the right of way.  You turned into the left lane, which was closest to you and therefore correct, then tried to move to the right for the lane you needed.  He should have waited for you.

We now have a highway off ramp that has two lanes turning left and two lanes turning right.  The law says that you turn into the corresponding lane.  So if you are in the far right lane on the ramp, you turn into the far right lane on the road.  There are a couple of left turns right after you get on the road that a lot of people take, including me.  So I always line up in the second from the right lane on the ramp and turn into the second from the right lane on the road, then signal and move one more lane to the left so I can get to the turn I need.  Almost every time I go through this intersection, someone tries to cut from the far right lane to the left, through me, and gives me the dirtiest look when I honk at them so they avoid running into me.  I fully expect to get t-boned there one of these days.  But unfortunately, I can't avoid the intersection or I would.

Yes, that's what happened. Thank you for explaining it more clearly than I did!

My husband had a story about driving with a co-worker the other day. He was in a car with two other co-workers and one of them (we'll call him Bob) was driving. Bob wanted to turn right and the car in front of them was turning left. Bob didn't want to wait, so he pulled up next to the car to make his turn.

It was a two lane road with no turn lanes. My husband mentioned this and his coworker was confused as to what he had done wrong.

I'm confused. I also don't see anything wrong there.

Was there a signal or stop sign? Regardless, I also likely would have gone next to the car to turn right. Does two lane mean one lane each direction, or two in your direction? Even if it was one in each direction and Bob went onto the shoulder briefly to turn, I don't understand the problem. Most people around here go onto the shoulder slightly to turn right, even with no one in front of them.

guihong

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #35943 on: Yesterday at 05:58:03 PM »
If I understand, there's one lane going one way, and one lane going the other.  So there's no "next to" for a car to go to  ???.  You're supposed to line up, single file (sorry,teacher popping out again).  In some places, going up on the shoulder can get you a ticket.



RainyDays

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #35944 on: Yesterday at 06:02:44 PM »
If I understand, there's one lane going one way, and one lane going the other.  So there's no "next to" for a car to go to  ???.  You're supposed to line up, single file (sorry,teacher popping out again).  In some places, going up on the shoulder can get you a ticket.

I don't mean driving on the shoulder. I mean, right before your turn, you move over to the right so that cars behind you can pass. And that often means being on the shoulder briefly.

In the OP's scenario, where I am, if there were cars behind left turn driver, they would have used the shoulder to pass.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #35945 on: Yesterday at 07:19:53 PM »
mumma to KMC was approaching a major intersection.  She was turning left on to the main road, with a green arrow, indicating she could make her turn.  The other guy was oncoming to her, approaching from the opposite side of the main road, turning right to be going the same direction as mumma.  He had a red light.  So mumma had the right of way; oncoming driver did not.  He is free to make a right turn on red, if the way is clear.  Since mumma had the turn light, his way was not clear.  Therefore, he was in the wrong.

At least according to the laws where I am; not sure if this is true everywhere.

As for driving on the shoulder to make a right turn with someone waiting to make a left in front of you - yes, everyone does it.  Doesn't make it any less illegal.  Again, at least according the laws where I am.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

greencat

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #35946 on: Yesterday at 08:11:05 PM »
People who think that red lights don't apply to them.

Yesterday, I was turning off of a side road onto to a four lane road (the main drag in our smallish town) and I had a protected green arrow. The person coming from the opposite direction had his turn signal on indicating he was turning right, (so same direction as me) however I had the right of way because of the green arrow. Or so I thought (insert eyeroll). As I was about 1/3 of the way into the turn, he pulled into intersection. I stopped and honked my horn. He stopped and I proceeded to go again and so did he. I honked the horn again, a little bit more forcefully and he stopped again. I began to move again and needed to be in the far right lane, but before I could get into that lane, he was there, right in my blind spot and I had to quickly correct myself to avoid hitting him.

I'm pretty sure that because I had the protected green, either of the lanes on the road I was turning onto were mine for the picking and the other traffic had to stop, but maybe I was wrong?

If I have this correct, you were turning left, on a left turn arrow, and he was turning right on a red?  You had the right of way.  You turned into the left lane, which was closest to you and therefore correct, then tried to move to the right for the lane you needed.  He should have waited for you.

We now have a highway off ramp that has two lanes turning left and two lanes turning right.  The law says that you turn into the corresponding lane.  So if you are in the far right lane on the ramp, you turn into the far right lane on the road.  There are a couple of left turns right after you get on the road that a lot of people take, including me.  So I always line up in the second from the right lane on the ramp and turn into the second from the right lane on the road, then signal and move one more lane to the left so I can get to the turn I need.  Almost every time I go through this intersection, someone tries to cut from the far right lane to the left, through me, and gives me the dirtiest look when I honk at them so they avoid running into me.  I fully expect to get t-boned there one of these days.  But unfortunately, I can't avoid the intersection or I would.

My brother did get t-boned when either making a left or going straight (I don't remember) with a green light, while the person who hit him, a teenage driver, kept insisting to the officer who was writing the incident report, "I had right on red!"

Mal

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #35947 on: Today at 07:12:10 AM »
Boy do I have a nomination! I was helping a patron at the reference desk in the library when a woman walked right up to the desk, grabbed the counter pen - base, chain and all - and proceeded to carry it away. I called after her:

"Excuse me? Would you please return that pen?"
- "I need it."
"I'm happy to give you a pen but please ask first."
- "Well, you were busy and I didn't want to interrupt."

My solution to pen thieves is thus:

1. Pick cheapest pen possible (think ballpoint Bic pens or similar)
2. Remove cap before allowing patrons/customer access.

It's amazing how no one wants a cheap, topless pen. They may get dropped on the floor or lost, but they disappear at a much slower rate.

That sounds like a good strategy!

In this case it was less that she was trying to steal the pen - she did return the regular (cheap  ;)) pen I ended up handing to her - it was more the attitude: "I need something and I need it NOW, so I'm just gonna take it without asking". Plus, a counter pen has a base and chain for a reason, it's there for our new patrons to sign the form for their library cards and we'd like to have it ready when it's needed  ;)
« Last Edit: Today at 07:20:06 AM by Mal »

Thipu1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #35948 on: Today at 10:14:12 AM »
On the other hand, library patrons can be surprising in a good way.

We had a rule that pens could not be used at the reading room.  Constantly sharpening pencils was a pain so we invested in a ten-pack of cheap mechanical pencils from Staples. The readers liked them because they had the feel of a pen, made a clean line and could be sharpened with a click.

Oddly enough, very few of these ever disappeared.