Author Topic: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29  (Read 33782 times)

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shadowfox79

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #195 on: March 20, 2013, 11:20:53 AM »
Scouts are great for teaching independence.  Our boys do a little demonstration for new Scouts before their first campout--this is how to pack a backpack, what to take, etc.  They usually throw in some funny things-don't pack the huge iron skillet or the 5000 piece jigsaw puzzle.   ;D

I wish I could have been a Scout. Sounds like it would have been much more fun than Brownies, at least in the camping aspect.

As a Brownie, every Pack Holiday was spent at the same old building in Yorkshire, and five hours of every day was spent cleaning it. In theory this was supposed to be a good thing, but in practice it was an excuse for the Owls to do their own thing while we scoured the floors and dusted under the beds. It was a great way to really put you off housekeeping.

ladyknight1

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #196 on: March 20, 2013, 11:40:08 AM »
Now the Boy Scouts are required to earn the cooking merit badge as part of the Eagle badge requirements.

Venturing Scouts is for both boys and girls of age 13 and having finished 8th grade. It is all high adventure activities, and the youth run their crew themselves with a little adult guidance.

Piratelvr1121, yes. My son is a Troop Guide, which means he works with the patrols (groups of boys) and makes sure they ask for help when needed.

Virg

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #197 on: March 20, 2013, 12:05:38 PM »
kymom3 wrote:

"Scouts are great for teaching independence.  Our boys do a little demonstration for new Scouts before their first campout--this is how to pack a backpack, what to take, etc.  They usually throw in some funny things-don't pack the huge iron skillet or the 5000 piece jigsaw puzzle."

Yeah, they'll all laugh until they're stuck in the woods, lost and cold, and then they find out how easy it is to start a good fire with jigsaw puzzle pieces.  Then won't they be sorry?

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jaxsue

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #198 on: March 20, 2013, 12:14:45 PM »

But I never did learn how to cook BROWN rice. (I cannot get it to work worth a phooey.)

I grew up with a rice cooker, but only did white rice. I moved out and stopped eating rice for 20 years. Not kidding. Eating it more often, but not worth the $ for rice cooker. grr

What I love about my rice cooker is that it is programable.  I put the brown (or white, or wild, or steel-cut oatmeal) rice and water in when I think of it, set the timer for up to 12 hours ahead, and leave it.  No more forgetting the rice until dinner is almost done.

I love my rice cooker. It makes perfect brown rice, especially.

jaxsue

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #199 on: March 20, 2013, 12:18:02 PM »
My 3yo likes to "help" me cook. As PPs said it's far more hindrance than help ;) but he has fun and I'm sure he'll learn with time. I narrate what I do and why, and give him safe tasks that he can do himself.


I know it can be a hassle at times, but what he's learning is very valuable. My younger DS, who's 22 now, "helped" me cook when he was as young as 2 y/o. In fact, he invented new food items. I, being a good mom, ate them and thanked him profusely.

Fast forward to now; he's a sous chef and an amazing cook!  :)

Piratelvr1121

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #200 on: March 20, 2013, 12:21:05 PM »
Wish I remembered how to build a fire.  I did girl scouts up to Juniors..maybe early seniors.  Our troop disbanded in early hs and I wanted to continue but was too shy to start over with a new troop.  DH is great with building fires but won't be going on our camping trip because he doesn't have vacation time.  So bff, who was also a GS, and I are going to have to remind ourselves of how to build a fire.   

This could be interesting.

My older 2 boys like to cook.  They don't make a whole lot at the moment but they can cook pasta, mac & cheese, scrambled eggs and omelettes.  My middle son especially will look over my shoulder and likes to help me plan meals. :)
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

jaxsue

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #201 on: March 20, 2013, 12:21:56 PM »
Did you know? the personwho organized the most famous (and most successful) of the newsboys' strike in NYC was under 15? (If I remember right, they sometimes called him "the old man")

And his "union members" were 6 to 11, and they ran their own businesses, essentially.

http://ows.edb.utexas.edu/site/newsboys-strike-1899

Kids can do WAY more than we give them credit for nowadays.

ITA.

We bubble wrap kids nowadays, doing them no favors.

My dad was a newsboy in the late 20s. He remembers selling papers on busy city street corners "Black Tuesday" in 1929. When he was as young as 6 y/o, he took street cars to local grocers to buy a soup bone for a nickel (that's all they could afford).

TootsNYC

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #202 on: March 20, 2013, 12:25:56 PM »
I have 3 daughters.  For a while, it was REALLY hard to tell who the white sport socks in the wash belonged to.  I got fabric paint and left mine blank, DD#1 got 1 dot under the toes, #2 got 2 dots, and #3 got 3 dots.  It worked well.  It DID cause a laugh one time when my nephew asked why our socks all had eyes on the bottoms!   ;D

The thing about the "add a stripe/dot as you go down in age" was that it was easy to simply add a stripe when the 14yo outgrew the underwear/socks and Mom wanted to have the younger one use them."


How about teaching how to ask for help when needed? My oldest is a bright kid but does have some subjects he struggles with but will NOT ask the teacher or us for help. 


This is why the poster upstream who pointed out the direction on the back of the bottle did that kid such a favor.

I think it's easy for people, kids especially, to forget that EVERYONE had to *learn* the stuff they know.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #203 on: March 20, 2013, 12:28:32 PM »
Very true.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

LadyDyani

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #204 on: March 20, 2013, 12:50:26 PM »
Wish I remembered how to build a fire. 

Smear vaseline on a couple paper towels, twist them into ropes, and put them in a baggie to take along.  Vaseline burns long and works great for starting a fire.  Make a kindling tent over the paper towel rope, and light the rope.  Once the kindling catches, you can add larger pieces of wood.

I always had one or two kids sitting on the kitchen counter when I cooked.  Yesterday my 12 year old son baked a loaf of bread and some breadsticks. He's invented a new chicken recipe using orange harvest tomato soup, and he's always asking if he can pick the herbs to be used when I'm cooking.  Sometimes it doesn't turn out very well, but he was spot on with the garlic, pepper and brown sugar broiled pork chops.  Those were delicious, and now it's one of my go-to recipes when I need to cook a meal in less than 20 minutes.

My daughter, on the other hand, doesn't even want to enter the kitchen while I'm cooking for fear that I may ask her if she wants to help.  She'd live on ramen if I let her.  Of course, loving ramen may come in useful when she's on her own in a few years.
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MommyPenguin

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #205 on: March 20, 2013, 02:10:09 PM »
I tried to teach my oldest (6) to do the laundry, including things like putting it in and switching it to the dryer.  Unfortunately, the washer is just too deep for her to effectively reach the clothes.  I *could* have her put stuff in the washer and get stuff out of the dryer.  But it's also hard for her to carry a full load up the basement stairs.  So right now I just have her fold loads of kid stuff and carry it in a small, kid-sized laundry basket, up the stairs by person.  She still puts stuff in the wrong people's drawers *all* the time, though, drives me crazy.  But yeah, she's 6.  By the time she's 18, I would *hope* we'd have all these things ironed out.


She needs a long-hangled tongs!
And at 6, she really can be better at categorizing. Maybe some more coaching and a reward/penalty if she gets it right?

Maybe she can invent some system for helping her remember? (like, one stripe on the white socks for the oldest male; add a stripe for each person down the age spectrum; a white circle or dot for the oldest female?)

And maybe she doesn't put it in the drawer but on the bed?

The clothes all have little label tags with their sizes.  Her 2-year-old sister wears 2T, her 4-year-old sister wears 4T, and she is 6 and wears size 6.  The problem is mostly that she's daydreaming while she does it, so she'll mix up which pile is which, or she'll put the piles too close to each other and the clothes will topple into each other.  I'd also rather not have her put the clothes on the beds, because then there's an extra step to put them away.  Plus, her clothes would then have to go on a top bunk and the 2-year-old's in a crib, which would be hard to do.  I don't really mean that all of clothes are wrong, just that almost every time she puts them away, she manages to put at least one wrong outfit in each person's drawers.  She also takes forever doing it, and you can't chat with her or keep her company or she'll get so distracted it'll take her an hour.  What I really need is, as you've mentioned, some sort of inducement for getting them all right (or penalty for getting them wrong).  But that would require me going through everything and checking it all, which cuts down on the benefit of having somebody else fold the clothes to begin with.  I'll have to see what I can come up with.

Speaking of vacuums that are fun, I have this Dyson vacuum that the base is sort of like a ball shape.  Instead of just going back and forth in a straight line, it can roll on the ball so that you can basically push it any which way easily.  I *love* this vacuum.  It's like a grown-up vacuum toy!  :)  Plus, it's a canister vacuum.  I've never had one before, but I love that I can just dump the canister and don't have to worry about emptying a bag and keeping new bags on hand.  It's also much easier to glance through the stuff in the canister before dumping it to make sure no LEGOs have been sucked up.

Virg

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #206 on: March 20, 2013, 04:43:47 PM »
LadyDyani wrote:

"Smear vaseline on a couple paper towels, twist them into ropes, and put them in a baggie to take along.  Vaseline burns long and works great for starting a fire.  Make a kindling tent over the paper towel rope, and light the rope.  Once the kindling catches, you can add larger pieces of wood."

Tealight candles will do the same thing.  You just build your fire, pack it with kindling and put the candle at the bottom.  Once the fire gets going big it'll melt the candle pretty fast, but if it has trouble catching the candle will keep burning for a long time to help it start.  The advantage there is that you don't risk accidentally getting Vaseline on your hands and end up lighting your fingers on fire.

Virg

LadyDyani

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #207 on: March 20, 2013, 06:16:25 PM »
The advantage there is that you don't risk accidentally getting Vaseline on your hands and end up lighting your fingers on fire.

Virg

I should have said to smear the vaseline in the middle, and then twist in to a rope, which is what I do.  The vaseline doesn't usually get on anything, and even a strong wind won't stop it from burning. 
English doesn't borrow from other languages, it follows them down dark alleys and beats them up and searches their pockets for loose grammar.

afbluebelle

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #208 on: March 20, 2013, 08:22:16 PM »
My childhood was not safe... we all learned the "gas, match, run" method of fire starting after mastering the much more mundane "kindling lean-to" method. I highly prefer the GMR >:D
My inner (r-word) is having a field day with this one.
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LadyDyani

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #209 on: March 20, 2013, 08:24:49 PM »
My childhood was not safe... we all learned the "gas, match, run" method of fire starting after mastering the much more mundane "kindling lean-to" method. I highly prefer the GMR >:D

That one is the more enjoyable method.  At least it's not boring.  :-)
English doesn't borrow from other languages, it follows them down dark alleys and beats them up and searches their pockets for loose grammar.