Author Topic: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29  (Read 31110 times)

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Jules1980

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #210 on: March 21, 2013, 03:05:38 AM »
LOL!! Like a cat with a laser pointer!!! 

Piratebabe is hilarious with the real vacuum. He used to be terrified of it and would scream anytime it turned on. Now he's still unsure about it but will approach it when it's turned off like a knight in shining armor approaching a sleeping dragon.  When it turns on, he runs away but will sneak up behind it while I'm vacuuming but if it is turned towards him he turns tails and runs, but doesn't cry, just looks like he's plotting his next attack.   

He'll go up to it when it's turned off and unplugged and pull out the retractable cord and grin. Like "Ha! Got your tail, you vile beast!"

I love this story.

RebeccainGA

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #211 on: March 21, 2013, 09:21:07 AM »
My childhood was not safe... we all learned the "gas, match, run" method of fire starting after mastering the much more mundane "kindling lean-to" method. I highly prefer the GMR >:D
I prefer the big bag of dryer lint method - although that's not nearly as fun as the dryer lint wrapped around Doritos method (which is scarily fast) or the steel wool and dryer lint combo, which has been known to light wet wood in a drizzle (when we went to camp, every single time, it rained. I think they timed it that way deliberately!).

I miss Girl Scouts!

Hillia

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #212 on: March 22, 2013, 11:50:37 AM »
Not so much learning the hard way, but 'hey, my mom isn't a total moron'.

Last night DS (age 19) called to tell me that he had had the chance to have dinner with the CEO of an international corporation - this company makes a product used widely in his industry, and the company DS works for is the largest local customer of the product, so when he was in town for a conference he took the owners and managers out to dinner and DS was invited.  They went to a very fancy restaurant, and DS wanted to thank me for teaching him decent table manners and how to handle a formal dinner setting.

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siamesecat2965

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #213 on: March 22, 2013, 12:03:46 PM »
Not so much learning the hard way, but 'hey, my mom isn't a total moron'.

Last night DS (age 19) called to tell me that he had had the chance to have dinner with the CEO of an international corporation - this company makes a product used widely in his industry, and the company DS works for is the largest local customer of the product, so when he was in town for a conference he took the owners and managers out to dinner and DS was invited.  They went to a very fancy restaurant, and DS wanted to thank me for teaching him decent table manners and how to handle a formal dinner setting.

Oh very nice! and kudos to your son for acknowledging that you taught him this!

jaxsue

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #214 on: March 22, 2013, 03:06:30 PM »
Not so much learning the hard way, but 'hey, my mom isn't a total moron'.

Last night DS (age 19) called to tell me that he had had the chance to have dinner with the CEO of an international corporation - this company makes a product used widely in his industry, and the company DS works for is the largest local customer of the product, so when he was in town for a conference he took the owners and managers out to dinner and DS was invited.  They went to a very fancy restaurant, and DS wanted to thank me for teaching him decent table manners and how to handle a formal dinner setting.

Awesome!  :)

Katana_Geldar

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #215 on: March 25, 2013, 05:55:27 PM »
Not so much learning the hard way, but 'hey, my mom isn't a total moron'.

Last night DS (age 19) called to tell me that he had had the chance to have dinner with the CEO of an international corporation - this company makes a product used widely in his industry, and the company DS works for is the largest local customer of the product, so when he was in town for a conference he took the owners and managers out to dinner and DS was invited.  They went to a very fancy restaurant, and DS wanted to thank me for teaching him decent table manners and how to handle a formal dinner setting.

That sort of thing even happens in fiction. The main character in The Name of the Wind is very grateful for his mother teaching him how to behave in polite company when he meets a pretty girl, despite being annoyed by it at the time. He realised that it gave you a script when you didn't know what to say.

MrTango

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Re: young adults learning the hard way - update post #29
« Reply #216 on: March 26, 2013, 01:58:15 PM »
kymom3 wrote:

"Scouts are great for teaching independence.  Our boys do a little demonstration for new Scouts before their first campout--this is how to pack a backpack, what to take, etc.  They usually throw in some funny things-don't pack the huge iron skillet or the 5000 piece jigsaw puzzle."

Yeah, they'll all laugh until they're stuck in the woods, lost and cold, and then they find out how easy it is to start a good fire with jigsaw puzzle pieces.  Then won't they be sorry?

Virg

When I was a boy scout, I saved up all the dryer lint from my house for about a month before our annual week-long trip.  I stuffed zip-lock sandwich bags with it and then compressed it under a stack of encyclopedias for a few hours before actually sealing the bags.

Eventually, I started buying cheap wax from a craft store and dipping the compressed bundles of lint in melted wax.  Not only did it make them waterproof, but they burned much longer.