General Etiquette > Life...in general

Announcing "I want to see her body" - Death mentioned

<< < (10/14) > >>

AngelBarchild:
I've never been to a viewing at a funeral home, my family is very Irish Catholic. The deceased (casket)  is taken to the home of one of the family members, and placed in a side room. Then everyone comes over and visits. Sometimes it's open casket sometimes it's not. There's usually a lot of drinking, remembering, funny stories, and it's a requirement that someone (or more than one) make an bacon-fed knave out of themselves.

Piratelvr1121:

--- Quote from: Two Ravens on March 02, 2013, 01:41:45 PM ---
--- Quote from: Piratelvr1121 on March 01, 2013, 03:34:28 PM ---I've told DH I don't want a viewing. Since I prefer to be cremated anyway, I really don't see the need in the added expense to him of renting/buying a casket just for the sole purpose of a viewing.  My paternal grandparents were cremated but had a viewing and funeral mass prior to the cremation. Now as they were Catholic I don't know if they just couldn't get a priest to do the funeral mass unless their body was intact at the time, I dunno.

--- End quote ---

As of 1997, the RCC allows for cremated remains to be present at a funeral mass. It was not allowed before this.

--- End quote ---

Hmm.  My grandparents died in 2004 and 2008 respectively so I guess it was just their preference then.


--- Quote from: AngelBarchild on March 02, 2013, 08:44:56 PM ---I've never been to a viewing at a funeral home, my family is very Irish Catholic. The deceased (casket)  is taken to the home of one of the family members, and placed in a side room. Then everyone comes over and visits. Sometimes it's open casket sometimes it's not. There's usually a lot of drinking, remembering, funny stories, and it's a requirement that someone (or more than one) make an bacon-fed knave out of themselves.

--- End quote ---

Ha, that sounds like what happened after my maternal grandmother's family, though she was of Italian descent.  Well she did have a viewing at the church rather than a funeral home but after the reception we had a wake back at her house and my mother and sisters got VERY sauced and broke one of the beds jumping on it.

kareng57:

--- Quote from: Piratelvr1121 on March 02, 2013, 09:05:26 PM ---
--- Quote from: Two Ravens on March 02, 2013, 01:41:45 PM ---
--- Quote from: Piratelvr1121 on March 01, 2013, 03:34:28 PM ---I've told DH I don't want a viewing. Since I prefer to be cremated anyway, I really don't see the need in the added expense to him of renting/buying a casket just for the sole purpose of a viewing.  My paternal grandparents were cremated but had a viewing and funeral mass prior to the cremation. Now as they were Catholic I don't know if they just couldn't get a priest to do the funeral mass unless their body was intact at the time, I dunno.

--- End quote ---

As of 1997, the RCC allows for cremated remains to be present at a funeral mass. It was not allowed before this.

--- End quote ---

Hmm.  My grandparents died in 2004 and 2008 respectively so I guess it was just their preference then.


--- Quote from: AngelBarchild on March 02, 2013, 08:44:56 PM ---I've never been to a viewing at a funeral home, my family is very Irish Catholic. The deceased (casket)  is taken to the home of one of the family members, and placed in a side room. Then everyone comes over and visits. Sometimes it's open casket sometimes it's not. There's usually a lot of drinking, remembering, funny stories, and it's a requirement that someone (or more than one) make an bacon-fed knave out of themselves.

--- End quote ---

Ha, that sounds like what happened after my maternal grandmother's family, though she was of Italian descent.  Well she did have a viewing at the church rather than a funeral home but after the reception we had a wake back at her house and my mother and sisters got VERY sauced and broke one of the beds jumping on it.

--- End quote ---


Re cremations - it could be either.  I've gotten the impression (through friends) that RCC priests might have their own strong personal preferences about issues like this.  I don't want to say anymore, I don't want to get the thread locked.

Marbles:
Even within families this can be contentious. My MIL and her sister haven't spoken since their father's funeral ~40 years ago. Apparently Sis wanted to see the body and MIL was against it. I'm sure there is more to it, but that's the story that was given to my DH.

Just Lori:
My neighbor's MIL died and he and his family flew across the country for the funeral.  The deceased woman's sister was quite a character and has no issues with death.  In fact, during the viewing she stood by the casket and quite loudly told her daughter that she didn't want that shade of lipstick when she was in the casket; she wanted her own signature shade.

Then Auntie decided her sister needed to be buried wearing her favorite scent, which Auntie just happened to carry in her purse.  Auntie pulled it out and sprayed it liberally on her sister.  All was fine, until Auntie dropped the perfume.  In the casket.  Where it promptly rolled under the body.

Well, Auntie might have been generous with a few spritzes of perfume, but she wasn't going to let the whole bottle go down with her sister.  She began reaching underneath the body, trying to find the lost bottle.  Other attendees watched in horror or, perhaps more likely, left the room so they could laugh in private.

These are the types of stories that get repeated for generations.  It is my sincere hope that when Auntie dies, she will be wearing the correct shade of lipstick and clutching her perfume bottle in her hand.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version