Author Topic: Rude to eat in public?  (Read 8889 times)

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Fragglerocker

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Re: Rude to eat in public?
« Reply #60 on: March 05, 2013, 04:21:01 PM »
I don't think OP was rude at all.

However, as a mother of a toddler, this situation is close to one that I do find rude--and maybe it's just me.  In OP's case, it was a public shopping center where food is sold.  Perfectly fine then to eat & shop.  I do the same thing with DD (sometimes with food from the store, sometimes with a cracker or something I bring) to keep her compliant during shopping (or she can be a terror).  What I DO find rude is if we go to, say, story time at the library, and someone has brought their kid in with food.  First off, no food in the library--so even if they do tell their kid it's okay to share, it's setting the example that it's okay to eat in the library (it's not).  Secondly, usually they *don't* have enough for everyone and then it distracts my child from what she's supposed to be doing--listening/participating in story time.   Obviously, this is a different situation from what OP posted, but I did want to point out there can be a similar situation where the eating of food in public--even if it's the same rationale (maybe the toddler won't sit through story time without a snack?) is quite rude and is disruptive to the rest of the group.  (I always have a snack waiting for DD in the car, but if someone else has one during the story time itself, a promise of later food is not very helpful).

Knitterly

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Re: Rude to eat in public?
« Reply #61 on: March 05, 2013, 05:21:30 PM »
I don't think OP was rude at all.

However, as a mother of a toddler, this situation is close to one that I do find rude--and maybe it's just me.  In OP's case, it was a public shopping center where food is sold.  Perfectly fine then to eat & shop.  I do the same thing with DD (sometimes with food from the store, sometimes with a cracker or something I bring) to keep her compliant during shopping (or she can be a terror).  What I DO find rude is if we go to, say, story time at the library, and someone has brought their kid in with food.  First off, no food in the library--so even if they do tell their kid it's okay to share, it's setting the example that it's okay to eat in the library (it's not).  Secondly, usually they *don't* have enough for everyone and then it distracts my child from what she's supposed to be doing--listening/participating in story time.   Obviously, this is a different situation from what OP posted, but I did want to point out there can be a similar situation where the eating of food in public--even if it's the same rationale (maybe the toddler won't sit through story time without a snack?) is quite rude and is disruptive to the rest of the group.  (I always have a snack waiting for DD in the car, but if someone else has one during the story time itself, a promise of later food is not very helpful).

I agree that bringing food to a situation like that would not be good.  It would almost be asking for trouble.

I used to take LK to a song hour at the local play centre.  I found it extremely helpful if I took her 30 minutes early and gave her a snack at the centre (they have a specific snack area and provide food) with some of the other kids, she was infinitely better behaved during the song time.  They had a very specific rule against not food in any area that was not the snack area.  Nevertheless, there was one mom who would give her toddler a cookie at the start of songtime.  Eventually she was asked to leave if she could not respect the rule. 

that_one_girl

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Re: Rude to eat in public?
« Reply #62 on: March 06, 2013, 06:40:50 PM »
You were not rude, the other mother was rude.
It was a teachable moment for her child: He should learn that he can't always have what others have
teachable moment for your child: she could learn to share
It would have been nice of you to offer to the mother to share the fries with her child.  She could have the choice to decline or accept.