Author Topic: How can I tell job interviewees that they're being inappropriate?  (Read 6213 times)

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Paper Roses

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Re: How can I tell job interviewees that they're being inappropriate?
« Reply #30 on: March 31, 2013, 11:18:21 PM »
Well, for the record, "all those applicants" and "the unemployed" aren't all sending out resumes just to "demonstrate that they want to work."  Most of them are doing it because they actually DO want to work.  And don't want to be on unemployment, no matter how long it lasts or doesn't last.  And I don't think there are nearly as many people out of work because they are bad workers as you imply.  There are many, many people out of work because of circumstances beyond their control - a lot more than you might think.

I'm sorry the OP is having a difficult time with her applicants, but some of these generalizations about applicants and unemployed people are rather offensive.

Honestly, I think you (or your company) should review your job listings to maybe try to figure out why you are attracting the kinds of people you don't want and how to attract the ones you do, rather than scratching your head over it.

No one has even remotely implied that most people seeking jobs really do want and need those jobs.  We're all very aware that the job market has crashed and even very intelligent, highly skilled, experienced and hard working people are having a heck of a time finding employment right now.

I disagree, I think it is very clearly implied here:


But my point is that I "wasted" hours going through all the emails, letters and CVs.  I contacted even the most hopeless to say "thank you for the application but..." as one of the complaints of the unemployed is that they send out hundreds of applications and don't hear back from them. All those applicants also spend hours sending off for jobs that they are never going to be suitable for to demonstrate that they want to work.  All enforced by the Job Centres so they can continue to claim their benefits.  What is the point of it all.  Even if they want to work, they obviously know they aren't going to get an office job if all their experience is in a warehouse or as a mechanic so why can't they just apply for jobs in their own field of expertise.  Nationwide, hundreds of thousands of hours spent on pointless activity from both sides.
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Waterlight

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Re: How can I tell job interviewees that they're being inappropriate?
« Reply #31 on: April 01, 2013, 01:06:39 AM »
First off, don't volunteer anything. Second, if they ask, I wouldn't say anything beyond "we don't feel you're a good fit" and end the conversation. It is not your job to provide career counseling. I understand the frustration dealing with this stuff, along with the desire to help people who are desperately in need, but unless you are a professional career counselor on the side, don't do it. While someone might listen to you, the vast majority are just going to argue with you. For instance, the woman in the tube top -- dollars-to-donuts that her response would be "What? You're just jealous because I have big boobs. That's discriminatory!  Lawsuit!!!!" Or "Inappropriate flirting? I'm just friendly!" Even when they ask, most people aren't interested in hearing bad things about themselves.

This is one of those situations where "don't JADE" (Justify, Argue, Defend or Explain) is your best approach.

POD.

I'm an HR rep and this is the way the screening process works at the agency I work for:

1.  Resumes arrive via email, fax, U.S. Mail or in-person drop-off.

2.  I check each resume against the qualifications for the position (as clearly stated in the ad).

3.  If the applicant meets at least the minimum qualifications, the resume gets forwarded to the hiring manager (and--if this is a teaching position--our Education Manager as well).

4.  If the applicant DOES NOT meet minimum qualifications, he or she gets a form "thanks-but-no-thanks" email that reiterates the minimum qualifications for the position and says that we are interviewing only candidates who already meet those qualifications.

5.  If the hiring manager and/or Education Manager agree we should call the person in for an interview, I schedule an interview.

6.  If the hiring manager says no, I send a "thanks-but-no-thanks" email saying we have decided to interview other candidates at this time.

7.  The candidate(s) selected to interview are interviewed.  There are usually 3-4 people on the panel, including the hiring manager and me.

8.  We offer the best candidate the job!

9.  Candidates who were not selected for the position get a "thanks-but-no-thanks" email saying we have decided to offer it to another candidate.

I don't get asked for feedback all that often, even though we have had as many as 100-130 applicants for every opening.  But yes, even after having resumes screened by several different people, we've gotten a few "rotten apples" in interviews.  (I remember someone applying for an IT job who showed up in sweats and green Birkenstocks...  and a couple of people who would have done much better in the interview if they hadn't been rude to the interview panel or the front-desk staff.)

I do still get resumes from marginally-qualified (or not-qualified-at-all) candidates--but in that case I do try to be sympathetic, unless they've given me reason to be otherwise.  The way the unemployment laws are set up where I live, anyone collecting benefits must be "actively looking for work."  This means they have to make contact with at least 3 different employers during the week.

There have been a couple of rude responses to the "thanks-but-no-thanks" emails--but the way I see it, they're just shooting themselves in the foot.  I am not responsible for their bad behavior--they are.  And they've just eliminated any chance of being considered for a different job with the agency.
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amandaelizabeth

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Re: How can I tell job interviewees that they're being inappropriate?
« Reply #32 on: April 02, 2013, 12:27:31 AM »
For the first time someone left my company and so I  advertised the job in the appropriate professional journal.  In the advert i stated the legally mandated qualification (a degree),  professional registration, start date, and driving licence. Applications with letter and CV via the internet.

 A couple of years ago people with the necessary quals were like hen's teeth, but the universities bumped up their place numbers and now there is a surplus of graduates for jobs.  So that means it is hard to get a job in this field.
 
We got a lot of applications.  Weeded out those who did not have the qual, were not registered, did not live in this country or could not start in 2013.  Or a combination of above. 

Also advert asked for CV as a pdf as we do not use word.  So that was a whole lot more declines.

Eventually we were left with over 40 who were eligible.  So going through the CV's we found people with incorrect phone numbers, no longer valid email addresses, or wrong postal addresses.


By the time we came to the interviews I was wondering if I was Alice through the looking glass.  People came late to the interview, one did not show up, and the one who took the cake, came in looking like she had just got out of bed and certainly had not showered.

What did they not get.  This is a professional position in an industry where there are too few jobs.  No one owes you a job, you have to work at it.

Fortunately we found an ideal candidate.  Those who asked why they did not get the job, were told they did not fit in our company.  One woman rang me up and berated me that I did not contact her about the job.  When I pointed out she had the wrong email address on her CV, she somehow thought I should have known what the correct address was, if I searched for it.  Perhaps I should be running courses on how to get a job. 

dawnfire

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Re: How can I tell job interviewees that they're being inappropriate?
« Reply #33 on: April 02, 2013, 01:10:39 AM »
Maybe I'm being willfully naive here, but surely no one can truly be so uneducated in proper interview etiquette as to truly expect a tube top or alcohol to be appropriate in a job seeking situation.

I was once offered a beer when I arrived for a job interview.  (I declined and accepted a can of Coke instead).

The most I've been offered Coffee, tea or water

blarg314

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Re: How can I tell job interviewees that they're being inappropriate?
« Reply #34 on: April 02, 2013, 04:23:49 AM »

I have a suspicion that other job ads with loose pre-requisites for applying also get a huge flood of totally unqualified applications, and that this flood has gotten much larger with the high unemployment rate - people are applying for jobs they wouldn't normally, in a better economy.  However, I also suspect that other employers have a screening process that is significantly more stringent than "can spell own name right", "can spell company name right", "not completely illiterate" and "can answer the phone without insulting the interviewer".

In other words, other employers are also getting 250 applications for a job, but are only calling back 20 or so, and hiring one or two, rather than calling in tons of people for interviews who have zero chance of getting the job. So they don't even see most of the people you're interviewing.

It sucks that you can't change the screening system. Even something as simple as a cover letter explaining why they think they're suited for the job would probably let you screen out 90% of your applicants.


camlan

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Re: How can I tell job interviewees that they're being inappropriate?
« Reply #35 on: April 02, 2013, 07:16:07 AM »
Recently, our town library advertised for a part-time position, 10 hours a week. The main responsibility was to run the children's story hour once a week, plus regular library assistant duties the rest of the time--checking out books, shelving books, etc. The requirements were that you had to like children, know something about children's literature, and have customer service experience.

The ad was only up for 3 or 4 days and then it disappeared. I figured that they were flooded with responses and had enough to choose from at that point.

Well, about a month later, the ad reappeared. This time, the requirements were much more specific--college degree, early childhood education preferred or studies in Children's Literature, customer service experience, computer experience, close attention to detail, experience talking to large groups, be able to plan and teach a story-related craft weekly, casual but professional appearance. Previous experience working with kids or working in a library preferred. The ad went on to list in minute detail the work required--planning story hour and the related craft, helping kids find books, working upstairs in the main part of the library, pushing loaded book trucks, needing a flexible schedule. It was a lot for a 10 hour a week job.

My guess is that the first ad was so vague that lots of people thought, "Oh, hey, I'd like to work with kids," and applied for the job. They were probably inundated by stay-at-home parents who saw this as an easy way to make a little extra money. The additional requirements in the second ad were there, I think, to make it clear this wasn't just a fun and easy job where you read a story to a group of angelic toddlers once a week.

I suspect that the ad the OP's organization is sending out is vague enough that a) it isn't attracting the right candidates and b) it is attracting the wrong candidates. The problem is getting the Powers That Be to see this and fix the situation.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


xanne

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Re: How can I tell job interviewees that they're being inappropriate?
« Reply #36 on: April 02, 2013, 01:20:03 PM »
I work for a large pharmaceutical company that has a lot of filters on its hiring process.  I still get professional candidates who show up late and don't acknowledge their lateness (just a "I got lost, stuck in traffic, something) or in one case where the woman was wearing a blouse that was a "V neck" to just above her navel.  The Supervisor candidate who went to the wrong entrance of the building because he told me he didn't read the directions I sent to him. Some people who are so overwhelmed by their own importance that they are not polite to Administrative person who set up the interview. We may be peons in your mind, but we know how to tell the hiring manager how rude you were to us - a total deal breaker for a company that values all employees.

camlan

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Re: How can I tell job interviewees that they're being inappropriate?
« Reply #37 on: April 02, 2013, 02:22:32 PM »
I work for a large pharmaceutical company that has a lot of filters on its hiring process.  I still get professional candidates who show up late and don't acknowledge their lateness (just a "I got lost, stuck in traffic, something) or in one case where the woman was wearing a blouse that was a "V neck" to just above her navel.  The Supervisor candidate who went to the wrong entrance of the building because he told me he didn't read the directions I sent to him. Some people who are so overwhelmed by their own importance that they are not polite to Administrative person who set up the interview. We may be peons in your mind, but we know how to tell the hiring manager how rude you were to us - a total deal breaker for a company that values all employees.

Back when I *was* the hiring manager, I was out at the front desk one day, trying to sort out a huge mailing problem we were having. A young man came into the office, announced to the receptionist that he had an interview scheduled for 2 pm, but he was here now, at 10 am, and he thought we could interview him right away. He was rude and condescending to the receptionist, he shoved the papers I had on the counter over so he could put his briefcase down, and his overall attitude was pretty arrogant.

I knew right then that I would not hire him.

I nicely told him that we weren't prepared to interview until the afternoon and to please come back at 2. He told me that he'd need to hear that from someone with authority. I nicely told him that I would be the person interviewing him at 2, and that I was unable to alter my schedule for the day. Told him where he could get some lunch, turned my back on him and walked away.

He showed up for the interview, didn't seem at all fazed by our exchange that morning.

I usually checked with the receptionist after each candidate left, to get her feel for them, and to see if they had been rude to her. We were a small company and simply had no room for someone who thought themselves above the other employees.

I would advise anyone going for any job at any level at any company to be polite to every single person you meet. You have no idea who will be your next boss.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Carotte

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Re: How can I tell job interviewees that they're being inappropriate?
« Reply #38 on: April 03, 2013, 07:36:42 AM »

I would advise anyone going for any job at any level at any company to be polite to every single person you meet. You have no idea who will be your next boss.

That's my attitude by default, I cannot fantom being someone so self-entitled that would berate the 'lowly workers' to make me feel more important.
It's like being rude to waitstaf, that handle your food...
Plus if you do get the job you're already on the wrong foot with people that could make your life way easier or a living hell.

BeagleMommy

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Re: How can I tell job interviewees that they're being inappropriate?
« Reply #39 on: April 03, 2013, 03:19:15 PM »
We get this even from people who are applying to our graduate program.  I'm the one who calls to arrange interviews.  People who are good candidates will get an interview by phone.  Those who are marginal need a face-to-face interview.  I'm not sure why it's done this way, but it is how my director wants things done.  In the past I've had people:

- Sigh and ask me if an interview is REALLY necessary (if it wasn't I wouldn't be calling you)
- After I give them the times available ask why I can't be more accommodating of their life (because the person interviewing you has only so many appointments during the day.  He also teaches and serves on a committee)
- Not show up and not call to cancel

The best was the student who came with her entire family in tow.  Mother, father, brother, grandma and aunt.  I directed them toward the lounge to wait, but they wanted to sit in the interview with the candidate so she wouldn't get nervous.  That did NOT happen and she was not admitted into the program.

Yvaine

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Re: How can I tell job interviewees that they're being inappropriate?
« Reply #40 on: April 03, 2013, 03:28:52 PM »
My all-time favorite was in my sandwich shop days. A woman came in and was one of the rudest customers I've ever encountered. Berated all of us employees the entire time for asking her really normal questions about how she wanted her order. And then, after eating, came up and requested an application.  :o As if we'd want to work with her after that production! Maybe her point was that we were all so terrible that the owner should can us all and then hire her!

littlelauraj

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Re: How can I tell job interviewees that they're being inappropriate?
« Reply #41 on: April 05, 2013, 07:23:47 AM »
Yvaine's story reminded me of a similar situation in my shop.  I used to own and operate a small shop which consigned fine crafts.  Most of the vendors were friends of mine, and 99% of the customers were absolutely wonderful.  But that 1%!  I had two older ladies come through.  One lady was so nice and kept trying to show things to her friend.  The friend roundly criticized everything she looked at, including my work.  Really nasty piece of business, to the point that I just about stopped talking to her, only responding in monosyllables.  Eventually she chose to buy something, and at check out started to inquire about showing her work with me!  I was polite, but in my head I was thinking, "No way, lady!"  She definitely tanked her interview!