Author Topic: Enforcing a policy you consider unfair.  (Read 2296 times)

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LadyL

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Enforcing a policy you consider unfair.
« on: March 06, 2013, 10:26:23 AM »
LordL asked me for advice on this issue and I thought it would be helpful to get other perspectives.

LordL was hired into his current position via a recruiter. After he started, his boss sprung it on him that the expectation for the position was a 50 hour workweek, not the 40-45 that he expected and is fairly customary in his field. He was upset that he was not told this before he was hired, but he was basically fleeing another toxic job situation at the time and the pay and benefits at this job are good enough that he overlooked the issue. He has never quite agreed with the idea that he should have to work 50 hours if he is able to get the work done in 45 hours (he is a very efficient and fast worker - he will get done in a day what contractors quote them as needing a week to do). He feels strongly that it contributes to burnout and therefore lower productivity to work the excess hours.

Now they have hired someone to work under LordL. LordL's boss oversaw the hiring process and dealt with the recruiter. In conversation about what hours he will keep, New Guy suggested a schedule for an 8 hour workday. LordL said that they should discuss it in a meeting with the boss. During that meeting, when it came up, Boss gave them an odd look but said nothing. Later he called LordL and told him that New Guy is expected to work 50 hours, not 40, and the recruiter should have told him that. He wants LordL to tell him this news and arrange his schedule. LordL is upset because he feels this guy is getting "fleeced" the same way he did - not being told of the 50 hour work week policy before being hired - and New Guy has childcare issues that LordL is sympathetic to. He is somewhat afraid the guy will quit on him in response to the scheduling issue. He is also mad that his boss is passing the buck onto him to deal with a problem he is responsible for.

He is also convinced that his boss purposely withheld the information about the workweek from both of them. I told him that it might be a miscommunication, or it might have been the recruiter hiding it because he knew it would reduce the chance of the position being filled. He has one other coworker who he can ask about whether he knew about this policy in advance. But all of this is making him really feel betrayed by his boss (there is other relevant background; this is somewhat of the "straw that broke the camel's back").

The question is, should he talk to HR, his boss, or both about clarifying job descriptions and requirements before hiring people? How can he tactfully tell New Guy that he was mistaken about it being a 40-45 hour position (LordL apparently mistakenly told him that figure in the interview)?

Zilla

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Re: Enforcing a policy you consider unfair.
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2013, 10:33:27 AM »
LordL asked me for advice on this issue and I thought it would be helpful to get other perspectives.

LordL was hired into his current position via a recruiter. After he started, his boss sprung it on him that the expectation for the position was a 50 hour workweek, not the 40-45 that he expected and is fairly customary in his field. He was upset that he was not told this before he was hired, but he was basically fleeing another toxic job situation at the time and the pay and benefits at this job are good enough that he overlooked the issue. He has never quite agreed with the idea that he should have to work 50 hours if he is able to get the work done in 45 hours (he is a very efficient and fast worker - he will get done in a day what contractors quote them as needing a week to do). He feels strongly that it contributes to burnout and therefore lower productivity to work the excess hours.

Now they have hired someone to work under LordL. LordL's boss oversaw the hiring process and dealt with the recruiter. In conversation about what hours he will keep, New Guy suggested a schedule for an 8 hour workday. LordL said that they should discuss it in a meeting with the boss. During that meeting, when it came up, Boss gave them an odd look but said nothing. Later he called LordL and told him that New Guy is expected to work 50 hours, not 40, and the recruiter should have told him that. He wants LordL to tell him this news and arrange his schedule. LordL is upset because he feels this guy is getting "fleeced" the same way he did - not being told of the 50 hour work week policy before being hired - and New Guy has childcare issues that LordL is sympathetic to. He is somewhat afraid the guy will quit on him in response to the scheduling issue. He is also mad that his boss is passing the buck onto him to deal with a problem he is responsible for.

He is also convinced that his boss purposely withheld the information about the workweek from both of them. I told him that it might be a miscommunication, or it might have been the recruiter hiding it because he knew it would reduce the chance of the position being filled. He has one other coworker who he can ask about whether he knew about this policy in advance. But all of this is making him really feel betrayed by his boss (there is other relevant background; this is somewhat of the "straw that broke the camel's back").

The question is, should he talk to HR, his boss, or both about clarifying job descriptions and requirements before hiring people? How can he tactfully tell New Guy that he was mistaken about it being a 40-45 hour position (LordL apparently mistakenly told him that figure in the interview)?
Because Lord L was the one that told him the wrong information, he needs to be the one to clarify that.  Regardless of what the recruiter or the boss didn't disclose ahead of time.  Coworker asked him and he gave him the wrong info.  End of story.


All the other stuff should have been discussed initially when the boss first told him it was a 50 hour week.  I don't know how long Lord L has been working now for the new company, but to complain now is a bit unprofessional. 


ETA: As for enforcing a policy he doesn't agree with, if he isn't the rule making executive, he needs to enforce whatever his boss gives him neutrally and effectively.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2013, 10:37:45 AM by Zilla »

gorplady

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Re: Enforcing a policy you consider unfair.
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2013, 10:39:49 AM »
I agree with Zilla.

stargazer

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Re: Enforcing a policy you consider unfair.
« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2013, 11:25:39 AM »
This really seems like an employment issue not etiquette.