Author Topic: You're not keeping me in the loop.  (Read 5061 times)

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Coley

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Re: You're not keeping me in the loop.
« Reply #15 on: March 06, 2013, 04:23:00 PM »
From OP's update:  It isn't for my friend or anyone else on the staff to have an opinion about the legitimacy of her absences. That's between her and their boss. To my knowledge, no one has said anything directly to the boss about the impact of the coworker's absences. I did suggest to my friend the possibility that if they cover for her in doing her work, there may not be much impact for the boss to observe.

On the first bolded, I think this is an unrelated issue. In other words, sure it's true, but is also sounds like the absences are creating problems for your friend and even those reporting to him.  That's what he needs to address with the boss.  There are all sorts of ways to do this without commenting on the nature of the absences.

And the second bolded is a great point!  It's tricky drawing the line in those circumstances, but at some point he needs to stop being a hero and focus more on addressing a real problem.

You seem to have met my friend.  ;) Yes, he is ever the hero. And it tends to build up on him, and he gets resentful. We've been talking a lot lately about how that happens.

bopper

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Re: You're not keeping me in the loop.
« Reply #16 on: March 07, 2013, 09:02:03 AM »
  For normal coworkers, it is good practice to let someone know the task is complete or they should ask. Your friend should take advantage of this situation and make himself look good.

To: Coworker
Cc: Boss

"SickCoworker:

As we discussed on Friday, I have taken on your task of XYZ while you were out in addition to my normal duties.  I have gathered the data, created the TPS report and sent it to the clients (see attached).  Hope you are feeling better.

-Friend"

Coley

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Re: You're not keeping me in the loop.
« Reply #17 on: March 07, 2013, 12:36:19 PM »
  For normal coworkers, it is good practice to let someone know the task is complete or they should ask. Your friend should take advantage of this situation and make himself look good.

To: Coworker
Cc: Boss

"SickCoworker:

As we discussed on Friday, I have taken on your task of XYZ while you were out in addition to my normal duties.  I have gathered the data, created the TPS report and sent it to the clients (see attached).  Hope you are feeling better.

-Friend"

I like that, and I will pass it along to him. Thanks.

My friend told me this morning that he was called into his boss's office, where his boss thanked him for maintaining progress on the tasks despite his coworker's absences. The boss told him that he has observed how the coworker tends to overreact and stress out. My friend said he thanked the boss for the compliment and reiterated his willingness to pitch in.

I told my friend that he may need to be mindful of the fine line between pitching in and doing his coworker's job for her. He said that if he believes he is doing her job for her, then he will take that to their boss. The e-mail documentation that has been suggested here will help to support that.

I also suggested that if/when the coworker's staff complains to him or his staff about their increasing workloads due to the coworker's absences, that's another signal that he needs to speak with his boss. In addition, if her staff is overloaded or running behind on tasks that affect his staff, then he should speak up about that as well. That's part of keeping his boss in the loop, and he can do that without complaining directly about the coworker's absences.

Here's hoping he keeps his spine strong!

Mikayla

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Re: You're not keeping me in the loop.
« Reply #18 on: March 10, 2013, 01:46:37 PM »

You seem to have met my friend.  ;) Yes, he is ever the hero. And it tends to build up on him, and he gets resentful. We've been talking a lot lately about how that happens.

Actually, I've been him, and on more than one occasion :)

I did finally learn that once it started impacting my job performance on things that mattered, I owed it to myself to speak up. 



nyoprinces

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Re: You're not keeping me in the loop.
« Reply #19 on: March 10, 2013, 06:53:44 PM »
It sounds like your friend's CW is using a technique I've seen many times - in order to deflect attention from her absences and from the work she's not doing or passing off to other people, she's finding ways to place blame on the people covering for her for doing something wrong. The more she squawks about being "out of the loop" and about how your friend and everyone else are wronging her, the less focus is put on the fact that she's out of the loop because she's not present to be in it.

siamesecat2965

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Re: You're not keeping me in the loop.
« Reply #20 on: March 10, 2013, 07:13:55 PM »
It sounds like your friend's CW is using a technique I've seen many times - in order to deflect attention from her absences and from the work she's not doing or passing off to other people, she's finding ways to place blame on the people covering for her for doing something wrong. The more she squawks about being "out of the loop" and about how your friend and everyone else are wronging her, the less focus is put on the fact that she's out of the loop because she's not present to be in it.

Yes. I'm wondering if my one boss works here! she does this all the time. Drives us nuts too.

Coley

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Re: You're not keeping me in the loop.
« Reply #21 on: March 11, 2013, 10:17:01 AM »
It sounds like your friend's CW is using a technique I've seen many times - in order to deflect attention from her absences and from the work she's not doing or passing off to other people, she's finding ways to place blame on the people covering for her for doing something wrong. The more she squawks about being "out of the loop" and about how your friend and everyone else are wronging her, the less focus is put on the fact that she's out of the loop because she's not present to be in it.

Yes. I'm wondering if my one boss works here! she does this all the time. Drives us nuts too.

This is my gut feeling about the situation based on what my friend has told me. My friend said the other day that if she's worried about becoming irrelevant, she probably should be. The coworker was in the office a grand total of two days last week after being gone the entire previous week. She also didn't work a full week the week before that. This has been going on for the duration of her employment. Because of her absences and her complaints, the CYA e-mail approach probably is the best route for my friend to take.

From what he has told me, this coworker perceives that she is pretty much always being "wronged" by somebody. It sounds like she is rather unhappy with her job, and she is spreading that unhappiness throughout the office. It also sounds like their boss (who is still fairly new on the job) is wise to her now.

siamesecat2965

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Re: You're not keeping me in the loop.
« Reply #22 on: March 11, 2013, 02:21:29 PM »
It sounds like your friend's CW is using a technique I've seen many times - in order to deflect attention from her absences and from the work she's not doing or passing off to other people, she's finding ways to place blame on the people covering for her for doing something wrong. The more she squawks about being "out of the loop" and about how your friend and everyone else are wronging her, the less focus is put on the fact that she's out of the loop because she's not present to be in it.

Yes. I'm wondering if my one boss works here! she does this all the time. Drives us nuts too.

This is my gut feeling about the situation based on what my friend has told me. My friend said the other day that if she's worried about becoming irrelevant, she probably should be. The coworker was in the office a grand total of two days last week after being gone the entire previous week. She also didn't work a full week the week before that. This has been going on for the duration of her employment. Because of her absences and her complaints, the CYA e-mail approach probably is the best route for my friend to take.

From what he has told me, this coworker perceives that she is pretty much always being "wronged" by somebody. It sounds like she is rather unhappy with her job, and she is spreading that unhappiness throughout the office. It also sounds like their boss (who is still fairly new on the job) is wise to her now.

I think the CYA emails are a good idea. And maybe cc'ing the boss too, so he will have a paper trail of just how much your friend is covering for this CW.

Sadly I know her type. Nothing is ever their fault, everyone is out to get them, when in fact, its their own actions that cause them the most problems.

Coley

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Re: You're not keeping me in the loop.
« Reply #23 on: March 11, 2013, 02:56:09 PM »
It sounds like your friend's CW is using a technique I've seen many times - in order to deflect attention from her absences and from the work she's not doing or passing off to other people, she's finding ways to place blame on the people covering for her for doing something wrong. The more she squawks about being "out of the loop" and about how your friend and everyone else are wronging her, the less focus is put on the fact that she's out of the loop because she's not present to be in it.

Yes. I'm wondering if my one boss works here! she does this all the time. Drives us nuts too.

This is my gut feeling about the situation based on what my friend has told me. My friend said the other day that if she's worried about becoming irrelevant, she probably should be. The coworker was in the office a grand total of two days last week after being gone the entire previous week. She also didn't work a full week the week before that. This has been going on for the duration of her employment. Because of her absences and her complaints, the CYA e-mail approach probably is the best route for my friend to take.

From what he has told me, this coworker perceives that she is pretty much always being "wronged" by somebody. It sounds like she is rather unhappy with her job, and she is spreading that unhappiness throughout the office. It also sounds like their boss (who is still fairly new on the job) is wise to her now.

I think the CYA emails are a good idea. And maybe cc'ing the boss too, so he will have a paper trail of just how much your friend is covering for this CW.

Sadly I know her type. Nothing is ever their fault, everyone is out to get them, when in fact, its their own actions that cause them the most problems.

Yep. If she becomes irrelevant over time, it won't have anything to do with him "keeping" her out of loop!