A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. > Time For a Coffee Break!

Fitness inspiration needed

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Bethalize:
I did really well in my fitness last year. I was very motivated, because I had autonomy, mastery (thanks to some great coaches and trainers) and purpose (get fit!). Now I'm struggling. I need new fitness goals. I have to pick something to work towards, but I am utterly stumped as to what.

Please share your sporting goals and achievements with me to inspire me. I'm hoping you'll share and I'll go "a-ha! I want to do that."

WillyNilly:
Well what kind of fitness do you do?  What level are you?

Last year I did a Warrior Dash which is essentially a 5k obstacle course in mud.  it was a super fun.  If 5k is too easy, there are harder similar experiences like the Tough Mudder or Spartan race.These races involve more then just running, its running up and down hills, on uneven slippery terrain, there are swimming obstacles, and climbing obstacles, and balance obstacles, as well as jumping and crawling involved, so if your goal is to complete every obstacle you really need to cross train to be prepared. If you are less into the mud and silly obstacle stuff, a tri-athalon is a classic goal that will require you to cross train.

For me having a goal of a specific race keeps me motivated.  I like the fun, eclectic nature of the mud runs - its a goal, but its got a level of goofy attached to the accomplishment.  Sure I feel proud when I push myself and run a longer race then I'm used to, but when I do a mud run, I not only feel proud, I'm laughing at myself and my friends too. I enjoy the 'team' aspect of the mud runs as well.  The warrior Dash and the Tough Mudder I know both have a spirit of 'no one finishes until the last person finishes', so while sure for the very fastest its a race, but for most competitors its simply a goal to finish, and people will take the time to pause and help each other out (even total strangers) and everyone roots everyone else on.

Bethalize:

--- Quote from: WillyNilly on March 06, 2013, 11:09:51 AM ---Well what kind of fitness do you do?  What level are you?

--- End quote ---

 As it happens, I'm above medium fitness in cardio, strength and flexibility, and I'm reasonable at endurance. I'm still very heavy though so if you make me run I'm down and out much sooner than anyone else. My knees are getting better though, so as I get lighter running becomes more of a possibility.

I'm not looking for a personal solution, although I'm happy to talk about it. I really want some inspiration. Hearing about things that other people have done can get me fired up to try something.


--- Quote from: WillyNilly on March 06, 2013, 11:09:51 AM ---Well what kind of fitness do you do?  What level are yoThe warrior Dash and the Tough Mudder I know both have a spirit of 'no one finishes until the last person finishes', so while sure for the very fastest its a race, but for most competitors its simply a goal to finish, and people will take the time to pause and help each other out (even total strangers) and everyone roots everyone else on.

--- End quote ---

That sounds awesome. I had no idea such things were out there.

WillyNilly:
Well if you want a story of inspiration  :D
As I said last summer I did Warrior Dash. I'm the wrong side of 35 and a US size 14, so not a peak athlete by any means. I was born pigeon toed and bow legged and had to wear corrective shoes and get physical therapy until about the age of 8 just to walk.  Oh and I have a heart murmur. And I come from a family of overweight non-athletes (not even sports fans!)

But I always wanted to run.  When I was younger I was self conscious over being fat and didn't want to take up running or jogging because I thought kids in the neighborhood would make fun of me. I was an avid walker though. At the age of 32 I decided to do the Avon Walk for Breast Cancer - a marathon the first day, a half marathon the second. I completed my marathon in less then 12 hours. The next day I blew out my knee at 8 miles.

Then I got laid off from work and decided, what the heck I'm going to run.  I started the couch to 5k program and just got out there and tried. And 2 years later I did my first 5k, the Tunnel to Tower in NYC. For there a friend suggested another 5k, which I did a few months later, then 2 months after that I did the Warrior Dash, where I completed 11 of the 12 obstacles.

I never, not at 7, 17 or 27 would have ever in a million years have thought that by age 37 I'd have half a dozen 5k's under the belt, but I do.  When I first started running, half a block would leave me breathless and with shin splints. On SuperBowl Sunday I did a 4 mile race through Central Park (NYC). Sure it took me twice as long to finish as the winner took, but I did it. And I finished with a smile on my face.

MrsJWine:
I was going to say, sign up for a few short runs or run/walks. I've heard that's great motivation for improving.

I'm still kind of overweight (within recommended range, but I can *feel* that I'm not at my ideal weight), but when I started running I wasn't. Try Couch to 5k; I had to repeat the first five weeks, I think, and then all of a sudden I was able to run for a long time. I had some shin splint issues, but my sister gave me some pointers on how to run better (short, quick strides, instead of long, lopey ones), and those evaporated. I had some knee issues, but I've been wearing patellar stabilizers and focusing on strengthening the thigh muscles, and those issues are almost gone now, too. My point is that you may be able to safely do more than you think you can.

I've signed up for the Warrior Dash this summer, and it has really motivated me to do my lifting even when I don't feel like it. Next I want to do a triathlon, half marathon, and then hopefully the Tough Mudder next year sometime.

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