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Let them eatů artisan bread

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NyaChan:

--- Quote from: Zilla on March 12, 2013, 09:20:18 AM ---I've made the Dutch oven artisan bread and its that easy and delicious.  But I've never seen the crockpot version.  I can't see it being hot enough.  link?

--- End quote ---

Zilla, would you be willing to post your recipe?  I haven't made bread in a while, so my fingers are itching :)

Zilla:
http://www.artisanbreadinfive.com/2009/03/11/baking-bread-in-a-dutch-oven


It's the same dough recipe in the OP only in the dutch oven.  One trick I learned is that the best bread internal temp (taken with a meat thermometer) is 200 degrees.  So take the temps close to the end to check for doneness.

Just Lori:
I like to make a basic white bread loaf.  It's ridiculously easy, although you need to be home for about three hours to wait out the rising times.  My biggest concern with white bread is that we scarf it down like children who haven't eaten for several days.  It's quite addictive.

magician5:
When the "no-knead bread" recipe first became popular, the recommended rising time (using a teensy 1/4 teaspoon of yeast) was 14 to 20 hours rising time covered in a bowl on your counter (I find the top of my refrigerator to be ideal).

The flavor that develops is marvelous: complex, deeply satisfying, real REAL bread. I can't see how 3 hours in the refrigerator would do as well. Of course you don't have to be home all that time - it's "stir it together and forget it" bread!

I bake in a dutch oven and I would like to know how anyone experienced in this method gets a crust a little easier to cut.

And I'll have to look up the recipe for "crockpot bread", it looks interesting.

Zilla:

--- Quote from: magician5 on March 13, 2013, 07:05:03 AM ---When the "no-knead bread" recipe first became popular, the recommended rising time (using a teensy 1/4 teaspoon of yeast) was 14 to 20 hours rising time covered in a bowl on your counter (I find the top of my refrigerator to be ideal).

The flavor that develops is marvelous: complex, deeply satisfying, real REAL bread. I canbju't see how 3 hours in the refrigerator would do as well. Of course you don't have to be home all that time - it's "stir it together and forget it" bread!

I bake in a dutch oven and I would like to know how anyone experienced in this method gets a crust a little easier to cut.

And I'll have to look up the recipe for "crockpot bread", it looks interesting.

--- End quote ---

The 3 hour one I do at room temp and uses alot more yeast than the original one you mentioned.  As for the crust in Dutch oven, what do you mean easier to cut?  Mine is crusty and cuts fine with a bread knife.  I've also done it with a touch of water in the dutch oven so it steams.

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