Author Topic: Let them eat… artisan bread  (Read 2074 times)

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jpcher

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Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
« Reply #15 on: March 14, 2013, 05:52:58 PM »
It is a little bit different from the OP, but when I make bread, I usualy go for soda breads. There is no simpler bread, you do not even have to let it sit to rise, you can have fresh bread 1 hour after you decide to make bread.

Would you please post a recipe?

Thanks.

Nikko-chan

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Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
« Reply #16 on: March 21, 2013, 10:17:25 PM »
I used the recipe, only i baked it in the oven.... and forgot to put a pan of water in with it *headdesk* However I will let you know my results when it cools and I can taste it.

I forgot to let y'all know what happened. It was hard as a rock on the outside, but chewy goodness on the inside... next time I will remember that pot of water in the bottom of the oven!

stitchygreyanonymouse

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Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
« Reply #17 on: March 22, 2013, 09:35:28 AM »
I made the dough last night, but it wasn’t nearly as wet as the pictures on their website (in fact, I had to add another half cup of water, because it was so dry, I couldn’t incorporate all the flour at first, and I know I measured the flour properly). It also didn’t seem to rise very well in the two hours I had it on the counter.

I stuck it in the fridge overnight, and it did seem to have risen a bit more when I looked this morning. I think I’ll try to bake some tomorrow, perhaps. I’ll let you know how it goes.

Zilla

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Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
« Reply #18 on: March 22, 2013, 10:02:16 AM »
I made the dough last night, but it wasn’t nearly as wet as the pictures on their website (in fact, I had to add another half cup of water, because it was so dry, I couldn’t incorporate all the flour at first, and I know I measured the flour properly). It also didn’t seem to rise very well in the two hours I had it on the counter.

I stuck it in the fridge overnight, and it did seem to have risen a bit more when I looked this morning. I think I’ll try to bake some tomorrow, perhaps. I’ll let you know how it goes.

The flour in bread recipes are an estimate. you might use more or less.  it sounds like your flour had humidity or you packed the flour too densely. I dump half the flour into a gallon sized baggie and fluff it by rotating the bag.  then I scoop lightly keeping the fluffiness.  As for rising, did yoy proof the yeast?  and inside a warm draft free area?  I turn on the light in my oven and let it rise by the heat of the bulb.

stitchygreyanonymouse

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Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
« Reply #19 on: March 22, 2013, 10:25:16 AM »
I’m not sure what "proof the yeast" means.

I just followed the recipe on their site (http://www.artisanbreadinfive.com/2010/02/09/back-to-basics-tips-and-techniques-to-create-a-great-loaf-in-5-minutes-a-day), using Active-Dry yeast (because that is what the store had), but with a bit of extra water. They have a video somewhere on the site or their Youtube channel that addresses scooping and measuring the flour, which I followed.

It’s completely plausible that my flour has seen humidity… I bake and cook so little that it has been sitting in the pantry for about 8 months.

ETA: I poked around their site a bit more this morning. Their FAQs mention that certain flours need more water, including the King Arthur I used (but only 1/4 cup, not the half I added which still didn’t bring it to the pictured consistency). If the bread doesn’t bake well, perhaps I’ll try again with newly purchased flour and the guidelines on the FAQ
« Last Edit: March 22, 2013, 10:33:31 AM by stitchygreyanonymouse »

Zilla

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Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
« Reply #20 on: March 22, 2013, 10:44:53 AM »
I’m not sure what "proof the yeast" means.

I just followed the recipe on their site (http://www.artisanbreadinfive.com/2010/02/09/back-to-basics-tips-and-techniques-to-create-a-great-loaf-in-5-minutes-a-day), using Active-Dry yeast (because that is what the store had), but with a bit of extra water. They have a video somewhere on the site or their Youtube channel that addresses scooping and measuring the flour, which I followed.

It’s completely plausible that my flour has seen humidity… I bake and cook so little that it has been sitting in the pantry for about 8 months.

ETA: I poked around their site a bit more this morning. Their FAQs mention that certain flours need more water, including the King Arthur I used (but only 1/4 cup, not the half I added which still didn’t bring it to the pictured consistency). If the bread doesn’t bake well, perhaps I’ll try again with newly purchased flour and the guidelines on the FAQ


You can proof the yeast in the recipe specified warm water beforehand for 10 minutes.  It should be creamy and frothy and emitting a yeasty scent.  If it isn't, then the yeast isn't good.  I have had this happen to me many times with a brand new yeast packet/container.


Bread recipes, it's better to stick with the exact water but lessen the flour.  Recipes that call for 4 1/2 cups, I have used 3 1/2 cups to 5 cups depending on the weather, day etc.  So I would put in 3 cups and stir and then add a tad more flour in 1/2 cup intervals stirring after each one to gauge the wetness/doughiness.  In your recipe, you want it sticky and shaggy.  When you stir it it should remain formed but stringy.  But when you tilt the bowl, it shouldn't move or pour out.


ETA I see the recipe calls for 6 1/2 cups, start with 5.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2013, 10:47:55 AM by Zilla »

Sophia

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Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
« Reply #21 on: March 22, 2013, 10:50:18 AM »
Do you have a kitchen scale?  Flour is best weighed.  It is amazing the differences even the same cook using the same technique with the same flour will have.  An experienced cook can use a cup because they can adjust things as they go along based on the consistency.  Newbies can't.  You can find conversions online. 

stitchygreyanonymouse

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Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
« Reply #22 on: March 22, 2013, 10:54:30 AM »
Ok, I follow you now. My yeast was in the water for about 5 min. before I added the flour, and it was bubbling a bit and smelling yeasty, so I think it was fine.

I’ll try the less flour to recommended water way next time I make it.

Thanks!

Further reading about bread-making in general (I’m a pro at procrastination), makes me think that 2 hours in my house wasn’t going to cut it anyhow… we keep our thermostat at 62. On the bright side, I have read that the bread should continue to rise in the fridge, just slowly, so I’ll just leave it alone and let it do its own thing for a day or two.

Sophia—no scale. I really don’t want to get into crazy bread making, which is why this bread in five min. a day thing appeals.

Zilla

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Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
« Reply #23 on: March 22, 2013, 10:57:49 AM »
Ok, I follow you now. My yeast was in the water for about 5 min. before I added the flour, and it was bubbling a bit and smelling yeasty, so I think it was fine.

I’ll try the less flour to recommended water way next time I make it.

Thanks!

Further reading about bread-making in general (I’m a pro at procrastination), makes me think that 2 hours in my house wasn’t going to cut it anyhow… we keep our thermostat at 62. On the bright side, I have read that the bread should continue to rise in the fridge, just slowly, so I’ll just leave it alone and let it do its own thing for a day or two.

Sophia—no scale. I really don’t want to get into crazy bread making, which is why this bread in five min. a day thing appeals.


Yep, cold house-no rising. :)  I keep my house colder too.  I turn on the oven for a few minutes  on 300, turn it off.  Then leave the light on.  It seem to be a perfect rising temp for those 2 hours before the fridge.  The room temperature rising will develop the larger gas bubbles which will "knead" the bread internally and give it a airier texture. 

stitchygreyanonymouse

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Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
« Reply #24 on: March 25, 2013, 11:43:38 AM »
First baking—resounding failure.  It was really dense and clearly hadn’t properly risen (but tasted okay otherwise, so at least I know the recipe is worth making again).

The next batch of dough I make, I’ll see if I can get the toaster oven to hold a low temp for better rising before I refrigerate it.

CakeBeret

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Re: Let them eat… artisan bread
« Reply #25 on: March 25, 2013, 01:56:13 PM »
I tried the 5-minutes-a-day artisan bread over the weekend. I accidentally let the dough sit out overnight Saturday before refrigerating it. I made a loaf Sunday night and it was lovely. The crust was a little thick for my preference, but the interior was soft and fluffy, and it had a bit of a sourdough-like tang. My husband and our roommate are very excited about the prospect of having fresh bread four nights a week. :)

Stitchygrey, did you proof your yeast before using it? I don't think the recipe said to, but I always do to make sure my yeast is active. When I want something to rise nicely and promptly, I turn my oven on to 350 for one minute only, then shut it off and put the dough inside. It makes a good warm environment to foster rising.
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