Author Topic: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker  (Read 5969 times)

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Waterlight

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Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« on: March 12, 2013, 04:50:17 PM »
I've seen a PP re: job interview etiquette, but wanted to point out some additional etiquette rules for job hunters to keep in mind.  FWIW, I work in HR and have seen some examples of rudeness from applicants that were/are worthy of mention in the Special Snowflake Stories thread!

1.  Read the job posting carefully and follow the directions on how to apply.  For example, if a job posting says "No phone calls, please," that is exactly what is meant.  No phone calls.

2.  Apply only for jobs you are qualified for.  (Another reason to read the job posting carefully:  minimum qualifications for the position are often listed.)  HR departments get a lot of applications for every open position.  Every resume coming in has to be screened--sometimes by several people--to determine whether the applicant meets the minimum qualifications for the job.  Applicants who don't meet the requirements will not be interviewed. 

3.  Fill the application out completely and include all requested documentation, such as a cover letter, resume, and/or proof of education.  Incomplete documentation can give the impression that you have something to hide, especially when so many job seekers overstate or misrepresent their qualifications.

4.  Tailor your resume and cover letter to the job you're applying for.   Cover letters targeted to no employer in particular (or to the wrong employer) give the impression you are looking for just any job, and not the particular job you want. 

5.  If you are called for an interview, call the employer back ASAP to schedule it.   Interview time slots fill up fast--so if you don't call back promptly, you could miss your chance!  Failure to call back in a timely manner also gives the impression that you're not really interested in the job.

6.  Call or email if you'll be late for an interview or need to cancel or reschedule.  Emergencies happen--but a "no-call, no-show" shows a lack of respect for the employer's time and will eliminate you from further consideration for the job.

7.  Follow-up after the interview is fine...as long as it's not too aggressive.  Calling back a week later is fine; calling back every day for a week, not so much.  And pursuing HR or the hiring manager in their off time (e.g. following them into the store or the restaurant on their lunch hour or after work) to ask about the job is beyond the pale.

8.  If you didn't get the job, accept the employer's decision.  You're more likely to be considered for future job openings with the same employer if you take a rejection letter gracefully.

ETA:  Commentary on point #3, additional commentary on point #7... and the incident in #7 actually HAS happened at least once!  A job candidate followed me into a Safeway on my lunch hour to ask about the job.   :o
« Last Edit: March 13, 2013, 01:07:52 PM by Waterlight »
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oceanus

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2013, 06:09:25 PM »
Good list.

I’d like to add a few more, FWIW.  These all should go without saying, but applicants often forget them.

An interview, even a “great” interview, is not a job offer.

It’s okay to ask when they expect to make a decision (if the information is not volunteered), but the standard answer of “next week, in a couple of weeks” should not be taken too literally.  The person interviewing you often doesn’t know when the decision will be made.  There is nothing you can do to hurry them up. Don’t “read” things into why you haven’t heard – that’s just needlessly torturing yourself.  If they want to extend an offer, they will be in touch with you (assuming they have your correct phone number/email).

Until you receive and accept a firm offer, keep looking.

snowdragon

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2013, 11:19:21 AM »
9) Get a Baby Sitter No, it's not the job of other job seekers to watch your child while you are being interviewed. Nor is it the receptionists or other employees

10) Your Ride Should Wait In The Car Bringing other people with you does not look good, even if they are your way their.

11) Dress Appropriately Extremely low cut tops, or pants so baggy we see your undershorts, are not appropriate. A nice dress and a clean suit will do you well. No it's not "discrimination" to expect a bit of class.


Syrse

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2013, 06:45:05 PM »
How about

- don't badmouth your previous boss
- do some research into the company?



Library Dragon

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2013, 07:11:52 PM »
#3. Please research the company.  Yes, libraries have computers.  Know that!

Don't bad mouth the person you're replacing or a project you will be taking on.  The person who did our website left and I worked very hard correcting a lot of the problems (5 different fonts in 5 different colors on one page, checking how it looked on different monitor resolutions, etc.).  One interviewee went on a tangent about how bad our website was.  I was sitting there thinking, 'The old one or mine?' She could have talked positively about building usability features, but she chose negativity.

#11.  Appropriate dress includes your nails and hair.  You want to have blue hair that's great, just don't look like you are 6 weeks between dye jobs.  I don't care if you wear green nail polish, but nails should be neat and not leaving polish chips on the paperwork. (Two different people.)

#12. I'm glad you have a deeply spiritual life.  Do not spend the interview telling me how
a. You were led by the big purple deity to apply for this job, or
B. How every aspect of your new job will be imbued with your love for the big purple deity. 

When my husband was helping to interview for a new religious ed director at church he wanted to know about administrative ability, not prayer style.

#13. Don't be rude to the frontline staff! 

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nuit93

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #5 on: April 07, 2013, 10:10:36 PM »
#14: Send thank-you notes to the people you met/who interviewed you!

BeagleMommy

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2013, 09:44:04 AM »
Know that the person interviewing you will, most likely, not be the person scheduling the interview.  If his/her secretary/assistant calls you to schedule an interview listen carefully to the dates and times that are available.

Ex:  If I tell you he has available appointments on Monday, Wednesday or Friday between 9:00 am and 11:00 am please don't ask if he has anything after 4:00 pm or can he meet you on a Saturday.  If any of those times were available I would have told you.

Please be clean.  This shouldn't have to be said, but when you show up to an interview reeking of BO it is not going to go well for you.  On that same note, please keep perfume use to a minimum.  One applicant to our program left a cloud of scent everywhere she went.  Most people found it annoying, but the one supervisor who has asthma found it suffocating.

mstigerlily

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #7 on: April 08, 2013, 09:51:24 AM »
11) Dress Appropriately Extremely low cut tops, or pants so baggy we see your undershorts, are not appropriate. A nice dress and a clean suit will do you well. No it's not "discrimination" to expect a bit of class.

I prefer to think of this rule as "Dress as well as, or better than, the your interviewer/company's employees". Meaning, I am interviewing for jobs, most of which as business casual, even men wear nice jeans there. I would go to the interview wearing a suit or nice dress (business attire, or what I call "law-firm attire")


Rule #15 Be nice to everyone you meet while on an interview. If you are rude to the secretary/assistant/intern/bottom-of-the-barrel-working-peons we will tell the hiring person- and believe me, they care about me more than about you!

Auntie Mame

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2013, 04:33:48 PM »


Rule #15 Be nice to everyone you meet while on an interview. If you are rude to the secretary/assistant/intern/bottom-of-the-barrel-working-peons we will tell the hiring person- and believe me, they care about me more than about you!


You beat me to it!  You would be shocked at the number of people whop are rude, condescending or snotty to me to me when I schedule their interviews.  Believe me, the manager I schedule interviews for values my input and asks me for my first impression of them and what I thought.  Some folks have the lost the job even before the interview because of the way they treated me. 
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Auntie Mame

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #9 on: April 10, 2013, 04:35:38 PM »
Rule 16: Make your resume easy to read.  No fancy fonts, no bright colors, no "creative" formatting.  I need to be able to skim it and determine in a few minutes whether or not you are qualified for the job.   

I have a lot of resumes and very little time to read them.
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snowdragon

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #10 on: April 10, 2013, 10:58:26 PM »
Rule 16: Make your resume easy to read.  No fancy fonts, no bright colors, no "creative" formatting.  I need to be able to skim it and determine in a few minutes whether or not you are qualified for the job.   

I have a lot of resumes and very little time to read them.


  I got told last semester that the way to get hired was to do all of the above.  By a professor.  She pulled out the resume of Nina Simon (http://www.museumtwo.blogspot.com/) and told us all the that the way to get noticed was to do something like her resume.
She had done pretty much everything you said not to.  I think that kind of "teaching" where folks are getting the idea that stuff like that is ok.

Auntie Mame

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #11 on: April 11, 2013, 12:38:18 PM »
Rule 16: Make your resume easy to read.  No fancy fonts, no bright colors, no "creative" formatting.  I need to be able to skim it and determine in a few minutes whether or not you are qualified for the job.   

I have a lot of resumes and very little time to read them.


  I got told last semester that the way to get hired was to do all of the above.  By a professor.  She pulled out the resume of Nina Simon (http://www.museumtwo.blogspot.com/) and told us all the that the way to get noticed was to do something like her resume.
She had done pretty much everything you said not to.  I think that kind of "teaching" where folks are getting the idea that stuff like that is ok.

So that explains.  Giving the person who screens resumes a headache from font and formatting doesn't really help with the job hunt.

ETA: I pulled up her resume, it made my eyes hurt.  I'm sure some businesses out there are looking for that.  I am also confident that many are not.  When you have upwards of 50 plus, sometimes higher, resumes to review, you gravitate towards easy to read and to the point.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2013, 04:42:26 PM by Auntie Mame »
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Hillia

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #12 on: April 11, 2013, 03:16:38 PM »
I didn't think it was that awful.  It wouldn't suit every situation, but for someone in a creative field who is selling their creativity and innovative abilities, it could work.  She's got a lot of information to present and it would get pretty tedious seeing it a long list of items.

Wasn't a fan of the picture on page 2,though.

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SamiHami

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #13 on: April 11, 2013, 07:54:46 PM »
Rule 17: Part of being appropriately groomed means paying attention to how you smell, also. If you have twenty-seven cats and you chain smoke, it's going to be obvious, so make sure that you are thoroughly clean as well as your clothing. If you make your interviewer gag you are not getting the job. Just because you are used to it and cannot smell it on yourself doesn't mean no one else can. If you are uncertain, ask a trusted friend to be honest with you.

On the other end of the spectrum, there is such a thing as over-grooming. Wearing too much perfume or other scents can be equally offensive. You can set off someone's allergies which can range from merely annoying to downright dangerous. Be clean, neat and fresh smelling, but you don't want to be referred to as "the perfume lady" when the decision makers are determining who to hire.

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JeseC

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #14 on: April 11, 2013, 08:21:33 PM »
A good rule for clothing is to dress one step above the job you're applying for.  This applies to low-end jobs as well:  for an interview with fast food or big box retail or something, good dark jeans and a nice top work well.  (Also, in this case, looking like you're there for any old job is just fine.  So is everyone else they hire.)