Author Topic: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker  (Read 5538 times)

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ncgal

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #15 on: April 12, 2013, 12:54:58 PM »
RULE 18: Please check with those that you are listing as a reference before giving out there name and number.  Might be a good idea to make sure that they will give you a good reference.  If you were escorted out the door, might not want to list former co-worker that you worked closely with and that basically supervised you since supervisors were located off campus.   

Yea, I just got a text the other day that someone listed me as a reference.  Hoping that I do not get a phone call.  Will just send the caller to HR.

BeagleMommy

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #16 on: May 09, 2013, 10:17:50 AM »
RULE 18: Please check with those that you are listing as a reference before giving out there name and number.  Might be a good idea to make sure that they will give you a good reference.  If you were escorted out the door, might not want to list former co-worker that you worked closely with and that basically supervised you since supervisors were located off campus.   

Yea, I just got a text the other day that someone listed me as a reference.  Hoping that I do not get a phone call.  Will just send the caller to HR.

Be sure to keep your references updated.  I recently found out one of my references was dismissed from the university for some insubordinate activities.  I promptly removed her from my references.  Make sure the phone numbers for your references are current.

veryfluffy

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #17 on: May 09, 2013, 10:34:11 AM »
#14: Send thank-you notes to the people you met/who interviewed you!

addendum: if this is the norm in your area/business!

Although this may be a "US-based" site, please note that "thank you notes" not only are not expected in some places, but may be even be viewed negatively.
   

nuit93

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #18 on: May 09, 2013, 11:36:08 AM »
#14: Send thank-you notes to the people you met/who interviewed you!

addendum: if this is the norm in your area/business!

Although this may be a "US-based" site, please note that "thank you notes" not only are not expected in some places, but may be even be viewed negatively.

Really?  I had no idea--where would that be?

I'm rather curious even though I don't have any plans to leave the country.

perpetua

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #19 on: May 09, 2013, 11:40:07 AM »
#14: Send thank-you notes to the people you met/who interviewed you!

addendum: if this is the norm in your area/business!

Although this may be a "US-based" site, please note that "thank you notes" not only are not expected in some places, but may be even be viewed negatively.

Really?  I had no idea--where would that be?

I'm rather curious even though I don't have any plans to leave the country.

The UK, for one.

A 'thank you for your time' email reiterating your interest in the position may be acceptable here *if* you dealt directly with the company's recruitment process and weren't placed at interview through an agent (if this is the case, you don't contact the company direct; all communications are done through the agency) but a thank you note on paper or even worse still a card would have you viewed as creepy and over-familiar and probably get you struck off the list of possibles.

RebeccainGA

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #20 on: May 09, 2013, 12:14:49 PM »
One we've encountered recently (hiring a replacement contractor in my office) - don't make your resume buzzword bingo, nor should you have more than two or three pages of resume!

We got one, I kid you not, from a woman who had apparently been a contractor since graduating college about two and a half years ago. All her contracts were one to three months. Each one had FOUR PARAGRAPHS of job details. We got maybe two jobs per pages - seven pages long altogether. Single spaced, small font, no margins. Guess whose went on the 'toss' pile?

The resume we got from the guy that had been in the field for twenty years, knew everything there was to know about the thing we're hiring for? A page and a half. Easy to read. He's interviewing today.

Cherry91

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #21 on: August 05, 2013, 08:02:19 AM »
One I encountered at a job interview recently:

Interviews often overrun. It's stressful for everyone involved, but it happens. Avoid sitting there tutting, pointedly looking at your watch, asking the receptionist when you'll be seen every two minutes, etc. You're just making me look better in comparison.  ;)

snowdragon

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #22 on: August 05, 2013, 01:41:25 PM »
Know what kind of environment you are willing to work in - but going into a situation and showing your disgust at the clients they work with is beyond rude. If you can't handle strong language perhaps working with distressed populations or frustrated computer users isn't for you.
 

Goosey

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #23 on: August 05, 2013, 02:24:35 PM »
Do not track down your interviewer's personal info and contact them that way. They will not think you have gumption, they will think you have boundary issues.

LazyDaisy

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #24 on: August 05, 2013, 07:58:17 PM »
Rule 16: Make your resume easy to read.  No fancy fonts, no bright colors, no "creative" formatting.  I need to be able to skim it and determine in a few minutes whether or not you are qualified for the job.   

I have a lot of resumes and very little time to read them.


  I got told last semester that the way to get hired was to do all of the above.  By a professor.  She pulled out the resume of Nina Simon (http://www.museumtwo.blogspot.com/) and told us all the that the way to get noticed was to do something like her resume.
She had done pretty much everything you said not to.  I think that kind of "teaching" where folks are getting the idea that stuff like that is ok.

So that explains.  Giving the person who screens resumes a headache from font and formatting doesn't really help with the job hunt.

ETA: I pulled up her resume, it made my eyes hurt.  I'm sure some businesses out there are looking for that.  I am also confident that many are not.  When you have upwards of 50 plus, sometimes higher, resumes to review, you gravitate towards easy to read and to the point.
I think that falls under the OP's rule #4  "Tailor your resume and cover letter to the job you're applying for" in that creative jobs may appreciate a creative-looking resume as long as it's tailored to the employer or position -- so no cute cat cartoons on a graphic designer resume for a position in the IBM marketing department for instance, but if you're applying for a graphic artist position for the marketing department at PetSmart it might get positive attention. On the flip side of that, for a creative position, a resume that obviously uses a Word template without any attempt to make it unique or memorable might just end up in the trash because it shows a lack of ability or thought in marketing yourself.

For the professor, she may have been giving advice for a particular job industry rather than for a general audience.
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Rhindle

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #25 on: August 05, 2013, 09:00:13 PM »
If you find another job before your scheduled interview, make sure to notify your interviewers. We won't hold that you accepted a different job against you but we take a very dim view of no-show candidates.

violinp

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #26 on: August 05, 2013, 09:17:56 PM »
In a group interview setting, make sure to listen to the other people with you - not in a one - uppy way, but because they may be your co - workers very soon.

If you are supposed to introduce yourself in a group setting with something interesting about yourself, don't say, "My name's Bob Smith and the most interesting thing about me is that I'm awesome!" You aren't funny, and your smart - aleck routine just cost you a job.

And, this may seem obvious, but don't text your friends during the interview. The only good thing you're doing by that is making it very easy for your potential employers NOT to hire you.
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


TheaterDiva1

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #27 on: August 05, 2013, 09:50:47 PM »
Rule #15 Be nice to everyone you meet while on an interview. If you are rude to the secretary/assistant/intern/bottom-of-the-barrel-working-peons we will tell the hiring person- and believe me, they care about me more than about you!

Good rule of thumb - think of everyone you meet as a potential colleague you'll be spending 8 hours a day with - because if you get the job, that will be the case... And you DON'T want to start off on the wrong foot!

Waterlight

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #28 on: August 07, 2013, 01:10:45 AM »
11) Dress Appropriately Extremely low cut tops, or pants so baggy we see your undershorts, are not appropriate. A nice dress and a clean suit will do you well. No it's not "discrimination" to expect a bit of class.

I prefer to think of this rule as "Dress as well as, or better than, the your interviewer/company's employees". Meaning, I am interviewing for jobs, most of which as business casual, even men wear nice jeans there. I would go to the interview wearing a suit or nice dress (business attire, or what I call "law-firm attire")

The "dress one degree up" rule applies, BTW, even in "creative" or more casual fields.  Where I work (at a preschool), jeans are accepted for everyday wear, provided they are neat and clean and don't show your underwear.  At a minimum, I would expect a job candidate to wear dress pants and a shirt or blouse.  (Since I'm in middle management, I went one or two degrees higher than that at my own interview:  a dress with a jacket.)

Today I interviewed a candidate who was wearing shorts and a T-shirt.  Yes, to a job interview.   :o  He also had poorly-groomed dreadlocks.  FWIW, I would have no problem with a candidate who wore braids or locks to an interview, as long as they were clean and neatly groomed. (My boss is African-American and wears neat braids, so braids or well-kept locks would be acceptable in my workplace.)
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Margo

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Re: Job HUNTING Etiquette: A Guide for the Job Seeker
« Reply #29 on: August 07, 2013, 06:09:30 AM »
Another Couple:

Don't head your Resume "Resume" or "CV" or "Curriculum Vitae"
Put your name at the top.

Trust me, the person hiring know's its a CV, they've seen a lot.

POD to researching the company / organisation you are applying to. It shows interst and helpd you avoid making silly mistakes.
 
I was one of the interviewers for a post recently.

One applicant (who had stated on their CV that they considered attention to detail and research skills to be among their strengths) told us that they were particularly interested in gaining experience in Area X of our field. We don't do any work at all in Area X, a fact which is very obvious if you were to Google us and read the list of Areas of Work which is shown on our home page.

The same candidate, when asked if they had any questions for us, asked a question which again, was very basic information about our organisation which is on our website. (the website comes up as the top hits if you google our name, or the name of the person who the application had to be sent to, and the website address is on the footer of our e-mails (the interview details were confirmed by e-mail)

Listen to what the interviewer(s) say
If you are asked a question, answer the question you were asked, not a slightly different question you thought you might get asked (and if you feel you must provide information which isn't actually an answer to the question, own it, say what you're doing - show you actually paid attention to what you were asked.

Also, listen to what the interviewers say even when they are not asking you a question. I have had candidates ask questions which were answered in the introduction we gave them when at the start of the interview.

I know it is nerve-wracking to be interviewed but this makes it look as if you weren't paying attention.

Get someone else to proof read your resume and cover letter

Spell check is a useful tool. So is proof reading your own documents, but consider getting someone else to check it too, as it can be easy to overlook errors, especially in something you have written yourself.

Tailor your application to the job you are applying for

We recently interviewed people for a post as receptionist. One applicant had previous experience both a as a receptionist, and as a secretary, but didn't mention either job in their cover letter, which was all about their most recent job, which was a production line job. None of the skills which the applicant listed themself as having, from that job, were remotely relevant to the job they were actually applying for.

I'm not sure whether this is a universal one, but I'd also recommend that you type all cover letters unless the ad specifically stipulates than a hand written cover letter is required.