Author Topic: Culture shock across America  (Read 5459 times)

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mmswm

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Re: Culture shock across America
« Reply #15 on: March 23, 2013, 01:09:07 PM »
I'd put Florida in a completely separate category than the rest of the Southern Atlantic and Eastern Gulf Coast states.  While the panhandle and the northern gulf coast of Florida is similar to the rest of the culture in the Southeast, the east coast, at least from Orlando down to Miami is completely different.  Miami-Dade county in particular is heavily influenced by the Cuban culture, which is vastly different than the rest of the Southern Atlantic.
Some people lift weights.  I lift measures.  It's a far more esoteric workout. - (Quoted from a personal friend)

FoxPaws

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Re: Culture shock across America
« Reply #16 on: March 24, 2013, 11:11:23 AM »
Laws concerning the sale, distribution, and serving of alcohol are set by each state. (We've actually had some confusion on this board over the years because posters didn't realize that.) Found this on Wikipedia and it's interesting how much it varies from place to place. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcohol_laws_of_the_United_States_by_state

The effect weather has on an area depends a great deal on how well equipped they are to handle it. Two inches of snow is going to impact Houston and Denver in significantly different ways. Be aware of what conditions are considered a fluke or dangerous for wherever you are and react accordingly, even if the same thing is a non-issue on your home turf.

There are some things you just have to “know” about places, even if they aren't so obvious on the surface. Trust the locals. If nobody swims in Piranha Pond, or drives down State Street after dark, or takes a shortcut through Old Man Crankypants’ pasture, there's probably a good reason.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2013, 11:26:11 AM by FoxPaws »
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Bottlecaps

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Re: Culture shock across America
« Reply #17 on: March 24, 2013, 01:59:38 PM »

There's New England: (Maine, Vermont (which I'm counting even though it has no coast line), New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut. Then there are the Middle Atlantic States:  Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Washington D.C.,and New York. And the Southern Atlantic states: Florida, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia. (Although some put Virginia and West Virginia in the Mid-Atlantic--I could not find a consensus on this).

Each region has its own culture, shaped by the people who settled there, the terrain, history, economics, etc. We've even had a war over the differences between the states. So, yes, saying "ma'am" will get you kudos in some areas and dirty looks in others.

Don't worry - not even people who were born and raised in West Virginia (like myself) can find a consensus on that one! :-P I personally identify more with the southern states, although I'm from North Central WV. People from the northern panhandle though may identify more with the north, the eastern panhandle tends to lean more toward DC's culture, and of course when you go more south, the more southern it gets.

When I worked in a call center up home, we took calls for a major telecommunications company and handled their southeast branch. I actually took calls from people in the same area in which I live now. We were told in training not to call them "ma'am" or "sir" because they may take it offensively, and I thought that was so odd - isn't the south where using those terms are most common? I didn't grow up saying ma'am/sir, but I really took to habit of it after moving to Alabama. Now I'm so afraid that when we move back, I might offend someone with it, since it's not nearly as common up home (at least in my region of the state).

There are some things you just have to “know” about places, even if they aren't so obvious on the surface. Trust the locals. If nobody swims in Piranha Pond, or drives down State Street after dark, or takes a shortcut through Old Man Crankypants’ pasture, there's probably a good reason.

I can't even stress how important this tip is! We have a river up home that is notorious for being quite treacherous in some places (whirlpools, eddies, riptoes, and one spot that is actually so deep they cannot measure it). So many out-of-towners, mainly college kids, would come in, hear the warnings but when they went to see the river, figure "it can't be that bad," as it really didn't look that bad on the surface. You truly had to be a local, or listen to a local, to know which spots were OK to swim in and which ones weren't. It looked like just another small West Virginia river running in a valley. As a result of that "Oh, it can't be that bad, the locals must be exaggerating" attitude, that river has had way more than it's fair share of drownings over the years. :(
"Some of the most wonderful people are the ones who don't fit into boxes." -Tori Amos


JeseC

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Re: Culture shock across America
« Reply #18 on: March 24, 2013, 03:40:41 PM »
Some things are just inappropriate no matter where you are.  Even if you are a local, don't try to excuse inappropriate behavior as "just part of the culture."  Especially not when someone is being outright offensive.

(An example I've seen is "Oh, people in this area just don't like <<religious garment X>>.  Mr. So-and-so wasn't being rude, that's just how we are here!")

Thipu1

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Re: Culture shock across America
« Reply #19 on: March 27, 2013, 10:36:42 AM »
Here in NYC, 'The City' only works if you're talking about Manhattan. 

An amusing thing in New York State is the use of 'upstate'.  In NYC, upstate is anything north of Yonkers.  People in Rockland or Westchesters consider 'upstate' as Albany.  In Albany, 'upstate' is Watertown, just south of the Canadian border.  People in Watertown don't use the term at all. 


stitchygreyanonymouse

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Re: Culture shock across America
« Reply #20 on: March 27, 2013, 10:42:32 AM »
It’s growing, too, because here in what could be considered "upstate" by NYCers, we call "central" NY, and I’ve actually heard people from here refer to the Hudson Valley (a bit north of NYC) as "upstate" (even though it is south of us. Brain hurt for this midwestern transplant). Watertown considers itself "northern"… a lot of things around there reference that.

Redneck Gravy

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Re: Culture shock across America
« Reply #21 on: March 27, 2013, 02:18:28 PM »
There are some things you just have to “know” about places, even if they aren't so obvious on the surface. Trust the locals. If nobody swims in Piranha Pond, or drives down State Street after dark, or takes a shortcut through Old Man Crankypants’ pasture, there's probably a good reason.

Yes! this times ten.  Safety trumps Etiquette - I've read that on here a hundred times. 

And when someone says something, "just isn't done" it isn't.  SO DON'T DO IT!




WillyNilly

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Re: Culture shock across America
« Reply #22 on: March 27, 2013, 03:28:33 PM »
Here in NYC, 'The City' only works if you're talking about Manhattan. 

An amusing thing in New York State is the use of 'upstate'.  In NYC, upstate is anything north of Yonkers.  People in Rockland or Westchesters consider 'upstate' as Albany.  In Albany, 'upstate' is Watertown, just south of the Canadian border.  People in Watertown don't use the term at all.

Since when is Yonkers not upstate?  ;)
If its north of The Boogie Down, its upstate to me!

Danika

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Re: Culture shock across America
« Reply #23 on: March 27, 2013, 04:53:23 PM »
An amusing thing in New York State is the use of 'upstate'.  In NYC, upstate is anything north of Yonkers.  People in Rockland or Westchesters consider 'upstate' as Albany.  In Albany, 'upstate' is Watertown, just south of the Canadian border.  People in Watertown don't use the term at all.

It reminds me of Massachusetts.



Every time you ask a resident "Where is X city" if the city is west of Boston, they seem to reply "Western Mass." Therefore, a majority of the cities in Massachusetts are in Western Mass.