Author Topic: invitation wording  (Read 2262 times)

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EveLGenius

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invitation wording
« on: August 13, 2013, 02:01:34 PM »
My sister and I are hosting a party for our parents' 50th wedding anniversary.  We're planning to have paper and pens available for people to write down memories about our parents, which will then be placed in a scrapbook for them to enjoy.  We're trying to avoid saying "no gifts" on the invitations, of course, so please tell me what you think of this wording:

"We ask that you bring with you a cherished memory of [parents].  Paper and pens will be available at the celebration to write down your memories, which will then be bound in a scrapbook to be enjoyed forever.  If you are unable to attend, we would love for you to mail or email a memory, which will be added to the scrapbook."

audrey1962

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Re: invitation wording
« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2013, 02:08:31 PM »
My opinion, which is worth the nothing you paid for it, is to skip all that and just send the invite. Relay the information when the person RSVP's.

gellchom

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Re: invitation wording
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2013, 02:38:47 PM »
I strongly advise you to ask people to send you their memories (and pictures, etc.), ahead of time, not write them out at the party.  Email or snail mail or whatever.  You'll get much better contributions; many won't do them at all if they have to do them at the party, or just scribble out "best wishes" or something.  No one wants to spend the time it would take to write something good while they are at a party.  Then you can assemble them into an album and give it to your parents for a gift at the party. 

We did this for our parents' fortieth anniversary many years ago.  They really, really loved it, and as a bonus, the guests did, also.  Several of them thanked us for the opportunity to look through old photos and recall happy memories.  Some made artwork; one even sent me his high school yearbook!  I love looking at that album whenever I visit.  My husband did the same thing for me for my 50th birthday, and I adore it, too.  Both times it was done as a surprise.

I am sure that they will love this absolutely unique gift as much as my family has.

Hmmmmm

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Re: invitation wording
« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2013, 02:43:22 PM »
I would send the request with the paper you want them to use with the invite. I personally wouldn't want to have to write up the memory while at the party. My handwriting has become so poor with all of the typing I do I'd rather type it and print it out on the paper you provide. Also, it could be a time consuming exercise to write it up, especially for older people. I'm assuming that for a 50th wedding anniversary, many of their friends and even family will be of advanced years. Hands can become shaky and take longer to complete.

Brisvegasgal

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Re: invitation wording
« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2013, 09:20:01 PM »
I'm also going to say that you should ask for the memories in advance. That way you can compile the. And give it as a gift on the night when everyone can read what was written. If you have the funds, it'd be great to have them printed into one of those photo books.  That way people can write extra bits in on the night if they want to. Hope it's a great party!

Thipu1

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Re: invitation wording
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2013, 09:34:11 AM »
I'm also going to say that you should ask for the memories in advance. That way you can compile the. And give it as a gift on the night when everyone can read what was written. If you have the funds, it'd be great to have them printed into one of those photo books.  That way people can write extra bits in on the night if they want to. Hope it's a great party!

I like this idea very much.  It would be a bit more work to coordinate the photos and the messages but it would be a lovely thing to present at the party.


rose red

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Re: invitation wording
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2013, 11:22:06 AM »
I agree with the advance thing.  If I was asked to do this, I would want to get creative and make it pretty and perfect which may take a few tries.  Doing it at the party may also cause a few "school test" anxiety.

EveLGenius

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Re: invitation wording
« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2013, 02:23:03 PM »
Thanks for your help!  We've modified the wording on the invite.

CrazyDaffodilLady

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Re: invitation wording
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2013, 06:23:30 PM »
Even with your wording, and even if you discourage gifts via word of mouth, there will probably still be people who show up with gifts.  IMHO, these gifts should not be opened or displayed at the party.  Otherwise it's awkward and embarrassing to the guests who followed your wishes.  The gift givers can be thanked quietly, and then the gifts should be discretely stashed away to be opened and acknowledged later.
It takes two people to play tug of war. If you don't want to play, don't pick up the rope.

Margo

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Re: invitation wording
« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2013, 07:57:58 AM »
I strongly advise you to ask people to send you their memories (and pictures, etc.), ahead of time, not write them out at the party.  Email or snail mail or whatever.  You'll get much better contributions; many won't do them at all if they have to do them at the party, or just scribble out "best wishes" or something.  No one wants to spend the time it would take to write something good while they are at a party.  Then you can assemble them into an album and give it to your parents for a gift at the party. 
.

I agree. 

miranova

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Re: invitation wording
« Reply #10 on: September 07, 2013, 03:04:44 PM »
Am I the only one who feels horribly put on the spot by those "share your memories about the guest of honor" things?  I don't write a lot of letters to people, and I feel forced to in that situation.  It doesn't help that at some baby showers the host will actually get up and read them all out loud.  So now the message that I was probably overthinking about and agonized over gets read to everyone.  When I'm at a big enough shower that it won't be noticed, I skip it.