Author Topic: Lines to stop the salespeople, UD#17  (Read 4207 times)

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Danika

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Lines to stop the salespeople, UD#17
« on: March 16, 2013, 06:39:44 PM »
There are a few chain companies in town that do massages. Back in 2009, I tried two separate places because they had specials. It's nice to get a massage, but they're expensive. The masseuses kept trying what must have been marketing techniques they were taught. They kept trying to put the hard sell on to get me to come back often. I don't have money to return often, and I disliked all the pressure they were putting on me to make recurring appointments so I didn't go back.

Since then, I've had many health problems and have spent a lot of my free time seeing doctors and dealing with health issues.

For Valentine's Day this year, I asked DH to get me a gift certificate to one of the massage places because I would like to have one again. I called to book the appointment. The owner kept grilling me and asking me why I hadn't been in for a massage in a long time. He asked if I'd been going elsewhere for massages.

I'm looking forward to getting the massage, but I'm already bristling knowing that for all the relaxation the massage will provide, I'm going to be peppered with questions about why I haven't been in more often.

Frankly, it's not their business. My budget's not their business. My health issues are not their business. My busy social calendar is not their business. I just want to reply "I've had other priorities." And keep repeating myself when they keep asking. Is there a polite way for me to say "All your pushy sales techniques are actually stressing me out and discouraging me from returning"? What would you advise for any encounter like this?
« Last Edit: April 07, 2013, 09:32:19 PM by Danika »

WillyNilly

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Re: Lines to stop the salespeople
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2013, 06:51:56 PM »
Is there a polite way for me to say "All your pushy sales techniques are actually stressing me out and discouraging me from returning"? What would you advise for any encounter like this?

Yes there is a polite way to say it... just like you want to: "All your pushy sales techniques are actually stressing me out and discouraging me from returning."

Without even getting into finances, if you are grilled about why you haven't been back you can say "actually I loved the feel of the massage, but the hard sell atmosphere is so unpleasant in some ways I've dreaded returning." Its also totally cool to request the massage therapist not speak to you during your massage, beyond whats required ("please turn over", "how's the pressure?", etc).

Being polite doesn't mean you have to say what they want to hear. If you are asked a question you can answer politely, even if your answer is negative.

Zizi-K

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Re: Lines to stop the salespeople
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2013, 06:52:40 PM »
I really like this as a response, actually:

"All your pushy sales techniques are actually stressing me out and discouraging me from returning."


kherbert05

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Re: Lines to stop the salespeople
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2013, 06:58:15 PM »
My schedule is none of your business. I have been very happy with your service until now. Your grilling is making me very unhappy. If it doesn't stop I will never return, I will tell my friends that you are hostile if customers don't return on your schedule, I will also post reviews on every online site reflecting your treatment of me.
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GrammarNerd

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Re: Lines to stop the salespeople
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2013, 10:02:00 PM »
Say the following to the person you book it with, and say it again to the person you check In with: "I know I'm not a regular customer, and due to a variety of factors, that just won't be possible now.  But I'd like this *one* massage.  So could you please let the massage therapist know ahead of time that I don't want to be "encouraged" to book more appointments?  That sort of thing really stresses me out and takes away any of the benefits and good feelings that the massage may have given me.  And I don't want to waste my Valentine's Day gift on something that's going to leave me feeling stressed out in the end."


TootsNYC

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Re: Lines to stop the salespeople
« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2013, 10:10:16 PM »
Say the following to the person you book it with, and say it again to the person you check In with: "I know I'm not a regular customer, and due to a variety of factors, that just won't be possible now.  But I'd like this *one* massage.  So could you please let the massage therapist know ahead of time that I don't want to be "encouraged" to book more appointments?  That sort of thing really stresses me out and takes away any of the benefits and good feelings that the massage may have given me.  And I don't want to waste my Valentine's Day gift on something that's going to leave me feeling stressed out in the end."

I like this!


Raintree

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Re: Lines to stop the salespeople
« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2013, 11:21:26 PM »
You have more patience than I do. I'd be looking for an alternate massage therapist. Is this an option? I live in a big city where there is a plethora of massage therapists to choose from, and while they might suggest that it's in my best interest to come in again at some specified interval, I don't think I'd be going back if they pushed the issue.

AmethystAnne

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Re: Lines to stop the salespeople
« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2013, 08:24:00 AM »
My schedule is none of your business. I have been very happy with your service until now. Your grilling is making me very unhappy. If it doesn't stop I will never return, I will tell my friends that you are hostile if customers don't return on your schedule, I will also post reviews on every online site reflecting your treatment of me.

I like this.

The employees are shooting the business in the foot.

The business employees are worried about their bottom line, so they get pushy, which annoys their clients, which affects the business' bottom line.

Softly Spoken

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Re: Lines to stop the salespeople
« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2013, 11:51:43 AM »
You know what we learned about selling appointments at the massage school I went to? Nothing. Why? It was an accredited, professional school that taught high quality technique, good medical knowledge, and smart business practices.  ::)

Good massage doesn't need to be sold. You "sell" with your professionalism, personality, client care, atmosphere, perks, high cleanliness and hygenie standards, quality products, etc. etc....no customer is going to come back just because you say they should! Give them a reason!

Massage is supposed to be quality, specialty healthcare, not a bottom line money factory (although it can be quite financially successful). This massage business you are dealing with sounds ridiculous. They may employee technically proficient therapists, but the rest of their business model is going to cost them customers.

You would not be rude to point that out to them.
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Danika

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Re: Lines to stop the salespeople
« Reply #9 on: March 17, 2013, 07:18:00 PM »
Thanks, everyone!

After 4 years, I thought I'd try a massage again. I had been looking forward to my next massage until the man on the phone was so pushy. When I told DH about that, he said that when he bought the gift certificates, he specifically told the lady at the desk that I'd felt they were pushy in the past and that he requested they not continue. But when I booked the appointment, I think I got the owner on the phone so he kept up his tactics anyway.

I looked online to see if there were other massage places in the city, and they all got worse reviews than this place. This is the highest rated one in the city, ugh.

So I'm going to take the advice of the posters here. I'll use your words. And when I walk in for my massage, I'll do as GrammarNerd suggested and mention up front to the massage therapist that I don't want more marketing techniques, just a relaxing massage.

Onyx_TKD

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Re: Lines to stop the salespeople
« Reply #10 on: March 17, 2013, 08:15:29 PM »
Thanks, everyone!

After 4 years, I thought I'd try a massage again. I had been looking forward to my next massage until the man on the phone was so pushy. When I told DH about that, he said that when he bought the gift certificates, he specifically told the lady at the desk that I'd felt they were pushy in the past and that he requested they not continue. But when I booked the appointment, I think I got the owner on the phone so he kept up his tactics anyway.

I looked online to see if there were other massage places in the city, and they all got worse reviews than this place. This is the highest rated one in the city, ugh.

So I'm going to take the advice of the posters here. I'll use your words. And when I walk in for my massage, I'll do as GrammarNerd suggested and mention up front to the massage therapist that I don't want more marketing techniques, just a relaxing massage.

IMO, you should consider telling them outright that their hard-sell tactics are driving you away, and if the longer they continue, the less likely you are to ever return or recommend them to others.

The impression I get from your posts is that you enjoyed your past massages there, but instead of getting to leave relaxed from your massage, you ended up feeling stressed and harassed due to their hard-sell techniques. You decided to give their establishment one more chance because you liked their massages, but as soon as you tried to book an appointment, they started guilt-tripping you about the frequency of your appointments. As a result, you're already starting to regret your decision to get a massage from them before you've even walked in the door. IMO, you should go ahead and tell them that you haven't been back because of their hard-sell tactics. It's a waste of your money too book a relaxing massage if it's going to result in you being stressed out by their hard-sell.

Danika

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Re: Lines to stop the salespeople
« Reply #11 on: March 17, 2013, 08:49:24 PM »
Thanks, everyone!

After 4 years, I thought I'd try a massage again. I had been looking forward to my next massage until the man on the phone was so pushy. When I told DH about that, he said that when he bought the gift certificates, he specifically told the lady at the desk that I'd felt they were pushy in the past and that he requested they not continue. But when I booked the appointment, I think I got the owner on the phone so he kept up his tactics anyway.

I looked online to see if there were other massage places in the city, and they all got worse reviews than this place. This is the highest rated one in the city, ugh.

So I'm going to take the advice of the posters here. I'll use your words. And when I walk in for my massage, I'll do as GrammarNerd suggested and mention up front to the massage therapist that I don't want more marketing techniques, just a relaxing massage.

IMO, you should consider telling them outright that their hard-sell tactics are driving you away, and if the longer they continue, the less likely you are to ever return or recommend them to others.

The impression I get from your posts is that you enjoyed your past massages there, but instead of getting to leave relaxed from your massage, you ended up feeling stressed and harassed due to their hard-sell techniques. You decided to give their establishment one more chance because you liked their massages, but as soon as you tried to book an appointment, they started guilt-tripping you about the frequency of your appointments. As a result, you're already starting to regret your decision to get a massage from them before you've even walked in the door. IMO, you should go ahead and tell them that you haven't been back because of their hard-sell tactics. It's a waste of your money too book a relaxing massage if it's going to result in you being stressed out by their hard-sell.

Exactly correct.

Do you recommend that I call and tell them this, or wait until I go for my massage. I kind of feel like I'd like to put it in writing so that I don't have to repeat myself to several people there, but I'm not sure if a letter is the best approach.

Emmy

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Re: Lines to stop the salespeople
« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2013, 09:01:18 PM »
When I get a massage, I don't want the masseuse to talk to me, I just want my mind to wander and enjoy the experience.  Having somebody try to talk me into buying something while I was a captive audience during the 'relaxing experience' would be the opposite of enjoyable.  Most people I know don't have massages on a regular basis and only enjoy them every once in a while as a treat.  I think your phrasing in the OP is just fine.  I'm surprised the place is still in business and has customers if they treat their customers the way they have treated you.  I wonder if the employees get a commission for the customers they book.

DH and I went for a super expensive massage and relaxation day at a fancy spa recently.  Upon leaving and paying a large chunk of change for the experience, the receptionist asked when (not if) we would like to book another appointment.  I told her that I would call if we wanted to make an appointment.  I did find her wording of asking when we wanted another appointment a little off putting.  We are not in a position financially to do that (we paid for the experience on a gift card I got when our situation was a bit different) and even in good circumstances, a super fancy massage is a treat, not something we do on a regular basis, but I didn't feel any of that was her business.

buvezdevin

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Re: Lines to stop the salespeople
« Reply #13 on: March 17, 2013, 09:12:36 PM »
Thanks, everyone!

After 4 years, I thought I'd try a massage again. I had been looking forward to my next massage until the man on the phone was so pushy. When I told DH about that, he said that when he bought the gift certificates, he specifically told the lady at the desk that I'd felt they were pushy in the past and that he requested they not continue. But when I booked the appointment, I think I got the owner on the phone so he kept up his tactics anyway.

I looked online to see if there were other massage places in the city, and they all got worse reviews than this place. This is the highest rated one in the city, ugh.

So I'm going to take the advice of the posters here. I'll use your words. And when I walk in for my massage, I'll do as GrammarNerd suggested and mention up front to the massage therapist that I don't want more marketing techniques, just a relaxing massage.

IMO, you should consider telling them outright that their hard-sell tactics are driving you away, and if the longer they continue, the less likely you are to ever return or recommend them to others.

The impression I get from your posts is that you enjoyed your past massages there, but instead of getting to leave relaxed from your massage, you ended up feeling stressed and harassed due to their hard-sell techniques. You decided to give their establishment one more chance because you liked their massages, but as soon as you tried to book an appointment, they started guilt-tripping you about the frequency of your appointments. As a result, you're already starting to regret your decision to get a massage from them before you've even walked in the door. IMO, you should go ahead and tell them that you haven't been back because of their hard-sell tactics. It's a waste of your money too book a relaxing massage if it's going to result in you being stressed out by their hard-sell.

Exactly correct.

Do you recommend that I call and tell them this, or wait until I go for my massage. I kind of feel like I'd like to put it in writing so that I don't have to repeat myself to several people there, but I'm not sure if a letter is the best approach.

Just to suggest that whether you call in advance or send a letter, or neither - write the above or some version of it on an index card and take it with you for your appointment.  Then, you can just show the card - and say you've expressed your concern, and hope you won't need to refer to the card again - and note on the card "1" then add to the count if you need to use it more than once.  If you do need to use it more than once, I would share that with the owner/management.

Having this message in writing to "share" as needed may make it less bothersome to need to keep saying it, and would underscore that you weren't simply annoyed by a one time use of a sales tactic, but by the repetition of a sales job to the detriment of your paid for experience.
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Danika

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Re: Lines to stop the salespeople
« Reply #14 on: March 17, 2013, 09:28:02 PM »
Thanks, everyone!

After 4 years, I thought I'd try a massage again. I had been looking forward to my next massage until the man on the phone was so pushy. When I told DH about that, he said that when he bought the gift certificates, he specifically told the lady at the desk that I'd felt they were pushy in the past and that he requested they not continue. But when I booked the appointment, I think I got the owner on the phone so he kept up his tactics anyway.

I looked online to see if there were other massage places in the city, and they all got worse reviews than this place. This is the highest rated one in the city, ugh.

So I'm going to take the advice of the posters here. I'll use your words. And when I walk in for my massage, I'll do as GrammarNerd suggested and mention up front to the massage therapist that I don't want more marketing techniques, just a relaxing massage.

IMO, you should consider telling them outright that their hard-sell tactics are driving you away, and if the longer they continue, the less likely you are to ever return or recommend them to others.

The impression I get from your posts is that you enjoyed your past massages there, but instead of getting to leave relaxed from your massage, you ended up feeling stressed and harassed due to their hard-sell techniques. You decided to give their establishment one more chance because you liked their massages, but as soon as you tried to book an appointment, they started guilt-tripping you about the frequency of your appointments. As a result, you're already starting to regret your decision to get a massage from them before you've even walked in the door. IMO, you should go ahead and tell them that you haven't been back because of their hard-sell tactics. It's a waste of your money too book a relaxing massage if it's going to result in you being stressed out by their hard-sell.

Exactly correct.

Do you recommend that I call and tell them this, or wait until I go for my massage. I kind of feel like I'd like to put it in writing so that I don't have to repeat myself to several people there, but I'm not sure if a letter is the best approach.

Just to suggest that whether you call in advance or send a letter, or neither - write the above or some version of it on an index card and take it with you for your appointment.  Then, you can just show the card - and say you've expressed your concern, and hope you won't need to refer to the card again - and note on the card "1" then add to the count if you need to use it more than once.  If you do need to use it more than once, I would share that with the owner/management.

Having this message in writing to "share" as needed may make it less bothersome to need to keep saying it, and would underscore that you weren't simply annoyed by a one time use of a sales tactic, but by the repetition of a sales job to the detriment of your paid for experience.

Brilliant and fantastic. I will definitely do this!