Author Topic: newspaper ink?  (Read 4513 times)

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MariaE

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Re: newspaper ink?
« Reply #30 on: March 22, 2013, 02:03:16 AM »
I remember a few years ago, in art class in middle school, we did some pottery and of course, it had to be baked in the kiln in the art room. Mr. Art Teacher explained to us that many will use newspaper to light the kiln, but he wasn't allowed to do that because it could put off toxic fumes. I honestly never thought about it though and never went digging for an answer, so I don't know for sure. However, a sauna is much different from an actual fire, and from the way Mr. Art Teacher explained things, it was actually burning the paper that could put off the fumes, not just getting it hot like a sauna would.

I've always used newspaper for kindling in our fireplace. It doesn't smell the way regular paper does - in fact it seems quite odorless - and it burns better too :)
 
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jmarvellous

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Re: newspaper ink?
« Reply #31 on: March 22, 2013, 09:35:04 AM »
I remember a few years ago, in art class in middle school, we did some pottery and of course, it had to be baked in the kiln in the art room. Mr. Art Teacher explained to us that many will use newspaper to light the kiln, but he wasn't allowed to do that because it could put off toxic fumes. I honestly never thought about it though and never went digging for an answer, so I don't know for sure. However, a sauna is much different from an actual fire, and from the way Mr. Art Teacher explained things, it was actually burning the paper that could put off the fumes, not just getting it hot like a sauna would.

I've always used newspaper for kindling in our fireplace. It doesn't smell the way regular paper does - in fact it seems quite odorless - and it burns better too :)

While I think the noxiousness would depend on the type of fire, somewhat, it is also true that newspaper ink formulas havs changed over time. What was awful in large quantities in your middle school years might be barely noticeable now.

MariaE

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Re: newspaper ink?
« Reply #32 on: March 22, 2013, 09:46:20 AM »
I remember a few years ago, in art class in middle school, we did some pottery and of course, it had to be baked in the kiln in the art room. Mr. Art Teacher explained to us that many will use newspaper to light the kiln, but he wasn't allowed to do that because it could put off toxic fumes. I honestly never thought about it though and never went digging for an answer, so I don't know for sure. However, a sauna is much different from an actual fire, and from the way Mr. Art Teacher explained things, it was actually burning the paper that could put off the fumes, not just getting it hot like a sauna would.

I've always used newspaper for kindling in our fireplace. It doesn't smell the way regular paper does - in fact it seems quite odorless - and it burns better too :)

While I think the noxiousness would depend on the type of fire, somewhat, it is also true that newspaper ink formulas havs changed over time. What was awful in large quantities in your middle school years might be barely noticeable now.

I could imagine that the paper used might also be different from country to country, so what's fine in one country isn't in another.
 
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Lynnv

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Re: newspaper ink?
« Reply #33 on: March 22, 2013, 09:14:56 PM »
While I think the noxiousness would depend on the type of fire, somewhat, it is also true that newspaper ink formulas havs changed over time. What was awful in large quantities in your middle school years might be barely noticeable now.

I have no idea about the toxicity of newspaper ink, but I just spent two days in a newspaper printing plant that is less than two years old.  And newspaper ink still stinks.   Badly.   Especially in huge quantities.  I swear I am going to have the stench hanging on me for another week at this rate.  ;D
Lynn

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Bottlecaps

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Re: newspaper ink?
« Reply #34 on: March 22, 2013, 09:27:14 PM »
I remember a few years ago, in art class in middle school, we did some pottery and of course, it had to be baked in the kiln in the art room. Mr. Art Teacher explained to us that many will use newspaper to light the kiln, but he wasn't allowed to do that because it could put off toxic fumes. I honestly never thought about it though and never went digging for an answer, so I don't know for sure. However, a sauna is much different from an actual fire, and from the way Mr. Art Teacher explained things, it was actually burning the paper that could put off the fumes, not just getting it hot like a sauna would.

I've always used newspaper for kindling in our fireplace. It doesn't smell the way regular paper does - in fact it seems quite odorless - and it burns better too :)

Come to think of it, we had a wood burning stove when I was a kid, and I remember my uncle used to use newspaper for kindling in it. I didn't even put those two together until now. Maybe it wasn't/isn't (depending on what the ink is made of and whether or not it's actually toxic or if it's just a myth) as bad in a fireplace or wood burner because they have better ventilation systems? :)
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christmascarol

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Re: newspaper ink?
« Reply #35 on: March 23, 2013, 01:08:45 AM »
Newspaper ink brings on my asthma. They're not all the same - usually, the cheaper the paper, (free ones being the worst), the worse the reaction.

But I don't think that was the case here.  If that had been her problem, she'd have been specific about it.  I think she just liked complaining.