Author Topic: Funeral parking  (Read 3384 times)

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Girly

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Re: Funeral parking
« Reply #30 on: March 21, 2013, 11:17:55 AM »
Seeing as how they asked, and didn't rope off, or have people there telling you not to park unless you were for the funeral, I can't really say they are rude. The signs did not say NO PARKING, they said 'Please, no parking - funeral'. I see that as a request.... one that you can say no to.


Calistoga

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Re: Funeral parking
« Reply #31 on: March 21, 2013, 11:25:41 AM »
Has the funeral home ever done this before? If this is a one time thing, I'm thinking there might have been some special circumstances. What they did makes me think of people physically standing in parking spots to save them or something.

I think it would be a little rude to park there, just because they had asked nicely that people refrain if possible. But if the rest of the spots were full, then by all means, have at it. They don't have a right to say you CAN'T park there, but there might have been some circumstances that made asking a fair request.

Luci45

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Re: Funeral parking
« Reply #32 on: March 21, 2013, 11:29:49 AM »
I said: One's church is like a family. Really, would you go to another family's Thanksgiving dinner because you couldn't park at your family's home?

Without getting into a theological discussion, I made the suggestion of going to Mass at another church because that was fairly common in my experience growing up Catholic. If you were obligated -- or simply wanted -- to attend Mass on a given day, and it wasn't feasible for you to go to your home church for whatever reason, you went to another. It's definitely not comparable to barging in on someone else's family dinner. Masses are open to all; family dinners aren't.

Point taken. I forgot about vacations and the like, but I still wouldn't go to another church if my own is convenient.

Thank you for pointing out my flaw.

Poppea

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Re: Funeral parking
« Reply #33 on: March 21, 2013, 01:35:18 PM »
I said: One's church is like a family. Really, would you go to another family's Thanksgiving dinner because you couldn't park at your family's home?

Without getting into a theological discussion, I made the suggestion of going to Mass at another church because that was fairly common in my experience growing up Catholic. If you were obligated -- or simply wanted -- to attend Mass on a given day, and it wasn't feasible for you to go to your home church for whatever reason, you went to another. It's definitely not comparable to barging in on someone else's family dinner. Masses are open to all; family dinners aren't.

Point taken. I forgot about vacations and the like, but I still wouldn't go to another church if my own is convenient.

Thank you for pointing out my flaw.

I wouldn't go to another church either.  How in the world would you know their mass schedule or what the parking situation is like there?   

If a large number of spaces are being reserved, I doubt that they are all for grieving immediate family members.  I have gone to many funerals where I barely (if at all) knew the deceased.  I went as a show of respect for a family member.  I could just as easily walk as the next person.

I would have tried to honor the request if it was a one time thing, but if there had been no other parking I would have just taken one of the legal public spots.


Mammavan3

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Re: Funeral parking
« Reply #34 on: March 21, 2013, 10:55:25 PM »
To clarify a few points, I drove to the place where I usually park, saw the blocked off spaces (about ten on each side of the street), did a semi-legal k-turn, parked and hurried into the church, all in the space of a minute or so. It wasn't until I thought of the situation later that I realized how far away some people would have to park.  If I had, I would have left the space empty and parked farther away, but I was really just focused on getting myself into church.

I don't think parents park on the street to avoid the drop-off line. In four years of attending weekday Masses, I've only seen one parent walking his child to school, and it's fairly clear that they live nearby and walk from home.

Attending Mass at another parish wasn't really an option since there are no Masses later than 8:00 a.m., and it was already just a few minutes before 8:00. 

Offering to park others' cars would not work for a variety of reasons, insurance liability and the time factor being only two of them.

I'm of an age where I read the obituaries every day (mainly to be sure I'm not in them), so I know there were no larger funerals scheduled for that day.

I think that the thing that I found the oddest was that there was not one car parked in any of the blocked-off spaces after Mass, nor were there more than a few spots taken in their lot. They could easily have put the signs out after Mass.

I do wonder how the business owners whose spaces they were blocking feel about the situation.

Thank you for the responses.