Author Topic: Funeral parking  (Read 3720 times)

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Mammavan3

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Funeral parking
« on: March 18, 2013, 03:14:06 PM »
I attend Mass most mornings. Our church has a rather small parking lot, and during the week many spots are taken up by the church school that shares the lot; the faculty and parent volunteers park there, and there are two lanes for parents who are dropping off students because many students come from other towns and busing is not available.   At the end of the very long street next to the church is a funeral home. There is no on-street parking on the other side of the church.

This morning I found that the parking spaces half-way down the block, on both sides, were blocked off with a sign that said "Please, no parking - funeral."  This was not a sign erected by the town and obviously not enforceable.

I snagged one of the few remaining spaces left, but how rude would it have been to park in one on the blocked-off spaces?  Many of the people who attend Mass are elderly, and not parking on that street would have meant a long walk from a side street for them. Also, Mass is over by 8:30, which is very early for a funeral to begin. When I left, none of the blocked spaces were filled.

Would one be consigned to Ehell for parking there?

SPuck

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Re: Funeral parking
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2013, 03:22:38 PM »
Definitely kind of rude. The funeral home in the center of our town doesn't have any parking at all, and people are just expected to make do. They would never try to claim the side of the road for a service.

Shoo

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Re: Funeral parking
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2013, 03:25:26 PM »
I think a funeral home is a business like any other in many ways.  If any other business had tried to do that, they would have been stopped, I'm sure.  I realize a funeral is a sensitive thing, but that doesn't mean the funeral home can just commandeer public parking spaces for its sole use.  It should buy land/space and create its own parking lot that it can control and monitor if it doesn't have enough parking spots for its customers/visitors, like any other business would have to.  I don't think you would have been rude to park in a publicly owned parking space that the funeral home had no right to block off.

SamiHami

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Re: Funeral parking
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2013, 03:26:56 PM »
You would have been perfectly fine to snag one of those spaces. They cannot lay claim to them as they don't own/control them. And as serious and sad as funerals are, other people have their own business to attend to that they consider to be important, as well. It's rather snowflakey, IMHO, of the funeral home to attempt this.

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Luci

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Re: Funeral parking
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2013, 03:36:54 PM »
Both of the above! I would probably deal with it the first couple of times, but after that there would be letters from me to the funeral home and the police department asking just what is going on, and maybe even discussing it with the priest as a parishioner if I got no response from the business and authorities.

We live next to a Catholic church and so there are lots of funerals, weddings, and masses that use our street. We have never seen a sign like that here, and those who attend the ceremonies and rites are always, always respectful of our driveway.


Sharnita

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Re: Funeral parking
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2013, 03:38:51 PM »
I disagree that their business is just like any other. They might want thode spaces so they can line cars up for a funeral procession. That is a unique parking need.,

White Lotus

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Re: Funeral parking
« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2013, 03:48:08 PM »
I would have parked wherever I wanted, but left a note. "At Mass. Gone by 8:30."  And then talked to the funeral home, the church and the town to see if there might be a better way.

LazyDaisy

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Re: Funeral parking
« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2013, 03:52:46 PM »
I assume that this funeral home is not a newly opened business and has been in operation for a while and yet this doesn't sound as though it has happened before. I wonder if family/friends of the deceased are responsible for the parking signs instead of the FH. Unless it happens again, I wouldn't report anything to the police or FH. But if it does, a call to the non-emergency police line would at least let you know if they have a permit for their parking rules. Otherwise it's not rude to park there.
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Onyx_TKD

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Re: Funeral parking
« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2013, 04:02:15 PM »
I disagree that their business is just like any other. They might want thode spaces so they can line cars up for a funeral procession. That is a unique parking need.,

All the more reason for them to have their own parking area where they have the right to dictate who can park there. I don't think the statements about them being "a business like any other" meant that their parking needs were necessarily the same. Instead, I think it meant that, like other businesses, a funeral home that needs private, reserved parking is responsible for providing those spaces themselves, not commandeering public parking.

Mammavan3

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Re: Funeral parking
« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2013, 04:21:44 PM »
It is an old, established business, and I have been attending the weekday masses for over four years and have never seen this before. There is a parking lot behind the funeral home, which is where the mourners usually line up in their cars. Those parking in the street just fall into line behind them.

Sharnita

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Re: Funeral parking
« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2013, 04:31:01 PM »
I wonder if it is s local dignitary or somebody else who would have more aattendance than is typical.

Luci

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Re: Funeral parking
« Reply #11 on: March 18, 2013, 05:04:05 PM »
I wonder if it is s local dignitary or somebody else who would have more aattendance than is typical.

Does it matter? They are still intruding on church time much more than necessary. Maybe a little bit before the funeral might be more appropriate, but I'm not even sure about that. Maybe hire a school parking lot and minibus shuttle  if it is all that big a deal!

It always ticks me off when someone gets special treatment because he is 'important', but I certainly understand that it could cause a rukus when there are crowds and people get upset with how they are treated.

City streets are for all and can't be reserved.

LazyDaisy

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Re: Funeral parking
« Reply #12 on: March 18, 2013, 05:22:41 PM »
I wonder if it is s local dignitary or somebody else who would have more aattendance than is typical.

Does it matter? They are still intruding on church time much more than necessary. Maybe a little bit before the funeral might be more appropriate, but I'm not even sure about that. Maybe hire a school parking lot and minibus shuttle  if it is all that big a deal!

It always ticks me off when someone gets special treatment because he is 'important', but I certainly understand that it could cause a rukus when there are crowds and people get upset with how they are treated.

City streets are for all and can't be reserved.
I disagree. I don't think of those instances as saying one person is "better" or more "important" it's just a practical matter of crowd control. If the FH knows that the funeral of a celebrity, for instance, is likely to draw many more people than usual, they could get a permit with the city, or arrange with the police, to close off certain streets or control traffic -- to know there is potential for chaotic or dangerous circumstances and do nothing to try to head it off is irresponsible to not only the funeral attendees, but the general public as well.

Also, why would public street parking for the church be any more special than street parking for the funeral home?
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jaxsue

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Re: Funeral parking
« Reply #13 on: March 18, 2013, 05:36:22 PM »
I used to live in an upstate NY town that had a traditional downtown area. As a result, parking was tight. The library and the funeral home were on the same street, with only a few addresses between. Unfortunately, the library was built at a time when parking wasn't considered a priority, so there were only about 8 spots in all - all of spoken for (handicapped spots/employees' spots). Finding an available spot was difficult on the best days.

If there was a funeral, the funeral home would claim most of the street, using signs like those in the OP. I walked to the library 90% of the time, so it seldom affected me. But I thought it was off. It's a public street. The parking spots belonged to no one.

I am currently disabled (temporary); you bet I'd park in one of those "reserved" spots.

Sharnita

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Re: Funeral parking
« Reply #14 on: March 18, 2013, 05:48:55 PM »
As far as dignitary I was actually thinking of the 20 something service member whose funerL I attended and the Patriot Guard escort both at the funeral home and then the church.