Author Topic: Child's food choices on trip  (Read 11029 times)

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wyliefool

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Re: Child's food choices on trip
« Reply #60 on: April 03, 2013, 11:50:48 AM »
OT--recipe please? That sounds awesome! I'm so tired of store-bought granola bars!!

I use this recipe as a starting point: http://happyhealthymama.com/2012/11/apple-peanut-butter-snack-bars.html

I always double the recipe. I'm not a fan of honey, so I sub unsweetened applesauce and add a small amount of sugar. At some point I plan to experiment with adding some shredded zucchini. I usually add raisins, walnuts, or chocolate chips, or some combination of those. Chocolate chip and walnut is divine!

Thanks!  8)

MommyPenguin

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Re: Child's food choices on trip
« Reply #61 on: April 03, 2013, 02:52:37 PM »

I understand wanting to control what your son eats, but I don't think you should ask your brother to order something different from what he is feeding his children.

I agree. I just don't think you can ask your brother to do this, other than a casual "make sure he eats his vegetables!" How will your son react to being told he must eat grilled chicken and broccoli while watching his cousins eat chicken fingers and fries? I know how my own 3-year-old would react and I wouldn't wish that on anyone, much less my kind and generous brother. And it's definitely not fair to expect the whole family to change their diet so your son won't feel left out, whether or not you approve of their choices.

One week of a not-so-healthy diet will not give your son heart disease, and a 3-year-old is capable of understanding that vacations have different "rules" and he will go back to his normal diet when he gets home.

This. I used to leave my kids with my sister all the time when they were little. One of the things they remember most about their stays with Aunt Jenny is that she always let them have dessert before their dinner.  I would never have allowed that, but staying with Aunt Jenny was special, with special rules. And it turned into a cherished memory for them.

When my niece was a year old, my sister went to Vegas for 5 days. On the day before her trip, she came to drop off my nieces things and left me a sheet with all kinds of rules.

Things like, bed/nap times, no sweets, no coffee, etc... It was a page long. I thought it was so cute, but told her that , in all honesty, Im probably not going to follow any of them. My niece is 12 now and I am still the cool aunt.

She gave you a single page of instructions, and you weren't willing to put the toddler down for a nap/bedtime at the times requested, or avoid giving her coffee?  And the "cute" comment seems sort of patronizing.  I hope that you let her know ahead of time (so that she could make other arrangements if it was important to her) that you weren't willing to follow her instructions for her child, because it seems that her decision to keep her child on her normal schedule and have her fed foods that are in her usual diet is more important than your desire to be the "cool aunt."

SiotehCat

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Re: Child's food choices on trip
« Reply #62 on: April 03, 2013, 02:59:08 PM »

I understand wanting to control what your son eats, but I don't think you should ask your brother to order something different from what he is feeding his children.

I agree. I just don't think you can ask your brother to do this, other than a casual "make sure he eats his vegetables!" How will your son react to being told he must eat grilled chicken and broccoli while watching his cousins eat chicken fingers and fries? I know how my own 3-year-old would react and I wouldn't wish that on anyone, much less my kind and generous brother. And it's definitely not fair to expect the whole family to change their diet so your son won't feel left out, whether or not you approve of their choices.

One week of a not-so-healthy diet will not give your son heart disease, and a 3-year-old is capable of understanding that vacations have different "rules" and he will go back to his normal diet when he gets home.

This. I used to leave my kids with my sister all the time when they were little. One of the things they remember most about their stays with Aunt Jenny is that she always let them have dessert before their dinner.  I would never have allowed that, but staying with Aunt Jenny was special, with special rules. And it turned into a cherished memory for them.

When my niece was a year old, my sister went to Vegas for 5 days. On the day before her trip, she came to drop off my nieces things and left me a sheet with all kinds of rules.

Things like, bed/nap times, no sweets, no coffee, etc... It was a page long. I thought it was so cute, but told her that , in all honesty, Im probably not going to follow any of them. My niece is 12 now and I am still the cool aunt.

She gave you a single page of instructions, and you weren't willing to put the toddler down for a nap/bedtime at the times requested, or avoid giving her coffee?  And the "cute" comment seems sort of patronizing.  I hope that you let her know ahead of time (so that she could make other arrangements if it was important to her) that you weren't willing to follow her instructions for her child, because it seems that her decision to keep her child on her normal schedule and have her fed foods that are in her usual diet is more important than your desire to be the "cool aunt."

Oh, I told her. My sister knew me well enough even if I hadn't told her.

I had a child only 6 months older than my niece at the time and I had been babysitting since niece was born. I didn't need a page of instructions and I thought a page was a bit much. She clearly trusted my judgement enough because she still left niece with me and continued to.

alis

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Re: Child's food choices on trip
« Reply #63 on: April 03, 2013, 03:15:10 PM »
I leave my kids with their "cool" auntie too. Never thought to leave a list saying "no coffee" at 1 year old.  I'm not suprised you laughed.

Bexx27

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Re: Child's food choices on trip
« Reply #64 on: April 03, 2013, 03:55:57 PM »
I leave my kids with their "cool" auntie too. Never thought to leave a list saying "no coffee" at 1 year old.  I'm not suprised you laughed.

Yeah, I would be a little insulted if my sister thought I needed to be specifically instructed not to give coffee to an infant!

We left DD with my parents overnight when she was 14 months old and I think I did write up her routine for them (i.e., her usual nap, snack, and bed times). I intended it as a helpful guide, not as instructions for them to follow. I think that sort of approach - giving them general information about his favorite foods and those that don't agree with him - is the way to go, rather than mandating a certain diet. But you have to be willing to accept they might not follow your suggestions.
How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these. -George Washington Carver

Onyx_TKD

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Re: Child's food choices on trip
« Reply #65 on: April 03, 2013, 04:04:38 PM »
I leave my kids with their "cool" auntie too. Never thought to leave a list saying "no coffee" at 1 year old.  I'm not suprised you laughed.

Yeah, I would be a little insulted if my sister thought I needed to be specifically instructed not to give coffee to an infant!

We left DD with my parents overnight when she was 14 months old and I think I did write up her routine for them (i.e., her usual nap, snack, and bed times). I intended it as a helpful guide, not as instructions for them to follow. I think that sort of approach - giving them general information about his favorite foods and those that don't agree with him - is the way to go, rather than mandating a certain diet. But you have to be willing to accept they might not follow your suggestions.

It's possible that the intent wasn't "don't give Toddler coffee" but rather "try to keep your coffee out of reach of Toddler because she'll drink it if she can." I'm told that I was quite the coffee thief as a small child. My mom apparently drank her coffee lukewarm for a good while when I was little, since she knew I'd drink it if I got ahold of it and didn't want to risk me getting burned.

Roe

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Re: Child's food choices on trip
« Reply #66 on: April 03, 2013, 04:32:10 PM »
I leave my kids with their "cool" auntie too. Never thought to leave a list saying "no coffee" at 1 year old.  I'm not suprised you laughed.

Yeah, my brothers and I have an understood plan that says we get to spoil one another's kids.  No one minds as we have all been "sitters" for one another many times.  One of life's greatest blessings is having a cool auntie or uncle. 

ettiquit

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Re: Child's food choices on trip
« Reply #67 on: April 19, 2013, 04:19:45 PM »
Eating junk food for one week isn't going to "hurt" him. I'd lighten up about it. If you've raised him on wholesome food and he likes some healthy things, have a talk to the family taking him just asking them to be sure to include vegetables at each meal or some such thing - have veggies on pizza if ordered, etc. Honestly, it's not so bad. He'll go back to his regular diet when he comes home. Offer to provide snacks for everyone to pack for their day packs in the park. Pack bags of mini carrots, cookies you make, etc. But again, don't make a bigger deal than it needs to be. Let him enjoy a week's vacation from health. We all do it. I take a week off of exercising. During the holidays I eat lots of crap but Jan 1 starts me back on my regular habits. Kids need that freedom too.

Eating nothing but junk for a week most certainly could hurt him.  I know that when I've gone a long time without having anything greasy and then cave and get fast food, my stomach is not happy.

If I took another person's child with me on a vacation, I would most definitely expect and want some guidance on what the little one should be eating.  Especially when it's a child as young as the OP's.