Author Topic: Farewell after seven years' service - no card, no gift, and no speech for you!  (Read 10292 times)

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audrey1962

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I also vote for acting professionally. He still works for the company and these are still coworkers.

Jelaza

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And there is another question: DF believes there is a strong chance that people from his Old Branch (possibly even Lesser Boss) might call him up and ask him for favours related to his old job in Old Branch (eg, "can you send me a copy of the letter template you devised for the Jones account, so I can use it for this new matter?" etc). Should DF acquiesce and do the favour for them? Or should he politely tell them that he no longer works in Old Branch, and they'll have to come up with their own template, etc?

If it were me, I'd not wait to be asked.  I'd contact either Lesser Boss or his successor right now, sawyI'm deleting/discarding all my old templates/paperwork/whatever from my old position, do you want copies before I do so.  It'll leave behind nice feelings and also, if they get in touch with him in the future, he can truthfully point out that he told them he was getting rid of them and offered to provide them with copies.

peaches

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And there is another question: DF believes there is a strong chance that people from his Old Branch (possibly even Lesser Boss) might call him up and ask him for favours related to his old job in Old Branch (eg, "can you send me a copy of the letter template you devised for the Jones account, so I can use it for this new matter?" etc). Should DF acquiesce and do the favour for them? Or should he politely tell them that he no longer works in Old Branch, and they'll have to come up with their own template, etc?

I would provide the information. He still works for this company. Why would he want to sabotage their efforts? Ordinarily, a company expects its branches to cooperate.

Now, if they end up monopolizing his time with their requests, that is another matter. Then, he would be justified in suggesting they consult the files on the original account, for example. Or pointing out that that will need to be handled by the person who replaced him.

Any behavior that smacks of carrying a grudge should be avoided, however. That's not professional and could backfire.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2013, 06:05:51 PM by peaches »

peaches

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And there is another question: DF believes there is a strong chance that people from his Old Branch (possibly even Lesser Boss) might call him up and ask him for favours related to his old job in Old Branch (eg, "can you send me a copy of the letter template you devised for the Jones account, so I can use it for this new matter?" etc). Should DF acquiesce and do the favour for them? Or should he politely tell them that he no longer works in Old Branch, and they'll have to come up with their own template, etc?

If it were me, I'd not wait to be asked.  I'd contact either Lesser Boss or his successor right now, sawyI'm deleting/discarding all my old templates/paperwork/whatever from my old position, do you want copies before I do so.  It'll leave behind nice feelings and also, if they get in touch with him in the future, he can truthfully point out that he told them he was getting rid of them and offered to provide them with copies.

When you work for a company, all of your work product belongs to them (not to you). They would expect you to leave those files, documents, blueprints, etc. behind. The reasoning is that everything you produced was done using their equipment, supplies, assistants, etc. Plus, they paid you.

If anyone is making copies, it would be the person leaving; but this would only be authorized if they were staying within the company.


Amara

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I'd say do the favor. It's the higher road and can only make him look good even long after his hurt feelings have evaporated (and they will). The pain is temporary, the choices he makes permanent.

dirtyweasel

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If I read the OP right it states that DF learned about the transfer on Monday and his last day was on Thursday, right? 

If that's so that means, he essentially gave three days "notice" which might have left his work mates and boss in a quandary.  Not that this is any fault of the OP's fiance, but that might leave a few people in a bind as they have to shift his current duties/work to other people.  Maybe his boss/coworkers are mad because of this?

I know that if this happened in my office it would put a lot of us in a serious bind and we wouldn't be too happy about it - especially with the short notice.  Just a thought.



cross_patch

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^that's actually a really good point.

cross_patch

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I vote no on the favor because
  • he no longer works in Old Branch; not his problem anymore
  • after being slighted this could be a slippery slope.

When you say slippery slope after being slighted, what do you mean? I don't quite understand that bit.

If you work for the same company, it seems a bit shortsighted to not help out the old department, and a good way to get a reputation as obstructive and unprofessional.

reflection5

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If I read the OP right it states that DF learned about the transfer on Monday and his last day was on Thursday, right? 

If that's so that means, he essentially gave three days "notice" which might have left his work mates and boss in a quandary.  Not that this is any fault of the OP's fiance, but that might leave a few people in a bind as they have to shift his current duties/work to other people.  Maybe his boss/coworkers are mad because of this?

I know that if this happened in my office it would put a lot of us in a serious bind and we wouldn't be too happy about it - especially with the short notice.  Just a thought.

Good point.  Usually when someone is transferring, the two departments (sections, units or whatever) work out a reasonable time frame, often results in a least a two or three weeks so that the employee's projects can be wrapped up and recruitment for a replacement can begin.


Venus193

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This could be a slippery slope in the sense that a previous poster stated:  Repeated calls of this nature.  I would be disinclined to allow demands to be made of me by those who had slighted me before.

Two Ravens

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And there is another question: DF believes there is a strong chance that people from his Old Branch (possibly even Lesser Boss) might call him up and ask him for favours related to his old job in Old Branch (eg, "can you send me a copy of the letter template you devised for the Jones account, so I can use it for this new matter?" etc). Should DF acquiesce and do the favour for them? Or should he politely tell them that he no longer works in Old Branch, and they'll have to come up with their own template, etc?

If it were me, I'd not wait to be asked.  I'd contact either Lesser Boss or his successor right now, sawyI'm deleting/discarding all my old templates/paperwork/whatever from my old position, do you want copies before I do so.  It'll leave behind nice feelings and also, if they get in touch with him in the future, he can truthfully point out that he told them he was getting rid of them and offered to provide them with copies.

When you work for a company, all of your work product belongs to them (not to you). They would expect you to leave those files, documents, blueprints, etc. behind. The reasoning is that everything you produced was done using their equipment, supplies, assistants, etc. Plus, they paid you.

If anyone is making copies, it would be the person leaving; but this would only be authorized if they were staying within the company.

Agreed. I doubt your husband would have any legal right to withhold these documents. He should prepare them all for his supervisor before he even departs. That is the professional thing to do.

cross_patch

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This could be a slippery slope in the sense that a previous poster stated:  Repeated calls of this nature.  I would be disinclined to allow demands to be made of me by those who had slighted me before.

I suppose I just expect people in the same company to make demands by virtue of working together, and to refuse that seems unprofessional.

katycoo

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The answer is, be professional at all times.

So, yes.  Provide them with the template that is owned by the company becuase he created it during the course of his employ.

And DON'T go crying to HR because his co-workers didn't give him a present.  It sucks, but they didn't have to.  Buck up and move on.  Life isn't always fair.

IF (and there's always the possibility the slight was innocent) there was no speech and no gift becuase co-workers don't like your DH, him being petty and crying to HR and refusing to share templates isn't going to help the situation any.

zyrs

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I think if he does favors for them it should be only if they won't interfere with work at his new job. 

Venus193

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I think if he does favors for them it should be only if they won't interfere with work at his new job.

True.  I was just concerned that the attitude of his former co-workers may lead them into something that will make his life miserable and sabotage his new position.