Author Topic: Farewell after seven years' service - no card, no gift, and no speech for you!  (Read 11252 times)

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Girly

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This could be a slippery slope in the sense that a previous poster stated:  Repeated calls of this nature.  I would be disinclined to allow demands to be made of me by those who had slighted me before.


I don't really see how he has been slighted.... he transferred to a different department, he didn't leave the company. There's also no 'requirement' that someone get thrown a party, or given a gift when they leave that department, is there?

Zilla

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This could be a slippery slope in the sense that a previous poster stated:  Repeated calls of this nature.  I would be disinclined to allow demands to be made of me by those who had slighted me before.


I don't really see how he has been slighted.... he transferred to a different department, he didn't leave the company. There's also no 'requirement' that someone get thrown a party, or given a gift when they leave that department, is there?


I agree.  Plus as others said, it's best to be professional and not childish in a workplace.  I can't see him keeping his job if he complains to HR and declines to help his old coworkers transition to his old job position.  I really hope you can get through to him OP!

Thipu1

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Agreed with all the above.  He should just shrug it off and let it go. 

When I retired after 21 years, my send-off was less than those given to summer interns.  Sure, it hurts but there's nothing to be done without seeming unprofessional.

There are great differences within most organizations but the situation described in the OP was decidedly odd. 

Venus193

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I would never advocate a complaint to HR about this.  What I object to here is that he was given less than others were, including people who didn't leave, after he contributed to others' events before.  This really isn't right.

BTW, that happened to me for years over birthdays until one year they did my birthday and I wanted to disappear through the floor when everyone yelled "Surprise" and sang the dumb song.  I took my vacation around my birthday every year from that day on.

Lynn2000

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Not sure when DH will actually be starting at the new job, but if possible, could he organize his templates, instructions, etc. from his old job and pass them on to a co-worker? That way if someone calls about one of those items, he can say, "Actually I gave them to Bob before I left, he'll be able to find it faster than I can," or "I think I left that with you guys, check the blue binder." That way he's being helpful, but not actually spending a lot of time on helping people.

I do think he ought to act professionally, especially since he's still with the same company; but regardless of whether he left under happy circumstances or not, there's a limit to how much his former co-workers should be asking of him. His first loyalty should be to his new job. Quickly directing them to Bob about a template, or answering one question, would be okay; but if it's something that's going to take more than, say, 30min to do, it's getting into weird territory. If he does get a lot of calls like this, I think he should talk to his new supervisor about it and ask what level of support he's expected to give his former co-workers. That would be my advice for anyone who's transferring between two branches of the same company, no matter how he left the old one.
~Lynn2000

wyliefool

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"I left all that stuff on my old computer. I'm sure IT can help you get it."

ladyknight1

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My position is a first for our organization. Many of the things I do weren't done before I came into the position and the position didn't exist. I have created manuals detailing the aspects of my job no one does but me, so in a few years when I change departments, it will be a fairly painless transition.

Twik

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In a social sense, this would be the equivalent of demanding someone tell you that they love you. Even if they comply, it won't feel satisfactory.
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Green Bean

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One thing I don't recall anyone mentioning is that the employees all chip in for lunch / gifts. The OP even mentioned that her husband chipped in on many occasions. How could one complain to their employer that fellow co-workers didn't spend their own money on you and expect to be taken seriously. If it were a company policy (which I've never seen), that would be one thing. But to formally complain about how other people choose to spend or not spend their money is SS behavior.

LifeOnPluto

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Thanks guys. DF has decided NOT to complain to HR (or anyone else) about the inequitable situation he experienced. He definitely sees the sense in not saying anything. He's moved on, and is enjoying his new position so far.

Re: the favours. DF has saved all his templates to a common folder, so hopefully no one should be calling him about that.

peaches

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Thanks for the update.

I think DF has made wise decisions that can only enhance his reputation in the organization.

I wish him every success In his new position!

bopper

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The only thing I would do is to no longer chip in.

Moray

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The only thing I would do is to no longer chip in.

Huh? Chip in on what? He doesn't work there anymore. (How else could he have had a lackluster Farewell?)
Utah

Otterpop

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Good update OP.  All of us get a raw deal now and again.  The trick is to move on with dignity and grace.  Good thoughts to your husband in his new position.

Emmy

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If your DH wants to vent, he can do it anonymously in the "I need a hug folder".  I understand the need to vent, but that should be done to trusted friends and family outside of the office.  Best not to complain to anybody inside the office.

I do agree that having only a few days (Monday to Thursday) to get a more formal party organized may not have been enough time.  Whatever the reason, it is still hurtful, especially when it seems you were the only person to be slighted.  I do agree that he made the right decision by not saying anything.  If he did say anything, most likely it would not have accomplished anything and made him look petty and there is nothing that could have been done.  Best to wash his hands of the old place and start fresh in the new job.