Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 221912 times)

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Katana_Geldar

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1080 on: April 26, 2014, 04:16:08 AM »
It might have more to do with actually eating food before drinking as food can cushion the effects a bit. I never start drinking before I start eating. And I'm more spirits and mixed drinks.

missmolly

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1081 on: April 26, 2014, 05:33:09 AM »
I think I told this story here before, but I was once at the Lindt cafe. Those of you who know your Lindt might know that they sell their famous Lindor chocolate balls by the weight. So this one gentleman wanted to purchase a single Lindor ball. When she weighed it, it came up to about 11g, therefore costing $1.20. He insisted that the last time he was there, it had only weighed say 10g and cost $1.10. So he pulled out a different ball and demanded she weigh it. The remarkably patient cashier explained that they would all weigh the same, but he was only convinced after she weighed 3 separate balls.

The clincher was that there was a plate with about eight cookies as free samples. After he verified that they were indeed completely free, he took all eight cookies.
"Any idiot can face a crisis, it is this day-to-day living that wears you out". Chekhov.

Phoebelion

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1082 on: April 26, 2014, 06:29:59 AM »
We re-finished out attic last year.  It had been finished who knows how long ago.  The first part of the project was tearing off all the paneling.

I was in charge of clean up, which I would primarily do when before DH got home from work.  He wields a mean crowbar so I tend to stay out of his way.

He saw me cleaning one time and had a fit.  I was supposed to be taking the nails out of the paneling and straightening them out so he could reuse them.  Clue "the look".

Nails went into the trash.


nayberry

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1083 on: April 26, 2014, 06:58:58 AM »
Actually, according to the article, the yeast breaks down the alcohol before it gets absorbed - well, some of it. Bread, it seems to me, would just absorb it and delay absorption by your body. Someone who knows better can feel free to correct me.

Personally, I drink beer because I love the taste, and while the milder effects (tongue loosening, relaxant) are pleasant, I do not enjoy inebriation. And since the beers I really like tend to have higher ABV (alcohol by volume), and don't come in non-alcohol versions, well, I may be testing out the yeast trick very soon.

Yeast doesn't metabolize alcohol. Alcohol is a by-product of yeast metabolism; that's what fermentation is. Yeast-pee if you will. Some yeast strains can survive in the human gut. There's a documented phenomenon of people being drunk without drinking. Their flora produce enough alcohol to intoxicate them.

Most yeasts die off at fairly low alcohol concentration. It depends on the strain but your average baking yeast probably gives up around 4% ABV. Wine yeasts can survive up to about 14%.

There are bacteria that metabolize alcohol. Saccaromyces sanfrancisco is what makes sourdough in a symbiotic relationship with the yeast. "Mother of vinegar" contains alcohol eating bacteria, resulting in vinegar.

I doubt that eating yeast can prevent or limit intoxication. Eating any kind of food will slow alcohol absorbtion.

per the bolded, i do know someone who after 1 beer is beyond tipsy, yet wine barely affects them.

doodlemor

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1084 on: April 26, 2014, 02:42:38 PM »
We re-finished out attic last year.  It had been finished who knows how long ago.  The first part of the project was tearing off all the paneling.

I was in charge of clean up, which I would primarily do when before DH got home from work.  He wields a mean crowbar so I tend to stay out of his way.

He saw me cleaning one time and had a fit.  I was supposed to be taking the nails out of the paneling and straightening them out so he could reuse them.  Clue "the look".

Nails went into the trash.

When I was a child I saw men straighten nails.  Maybe it's a thing from the depression, or from pioneer days when nails were hand made by blacksmiths.

My husband saves the old square nails when he finds them in our old house, because they are said to be less likely to split the wood.

Amara

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1085 on: April 26, 2014, 02:48:36 PM »
Doodlemor, tell your husband about this place: http://www.houseofantiquehardware.com/square-head-nails?GCID=S14464x015KEYWORD=old%20fashioned%20square%20nailspartner=gpc&gclid=CJCVwPTn_r0CFcRefgodhB4Apg

Here is their mission; he might really like it: At House of Antique Hardware we believe period homes were designed and built with a rare integrity. For those of us compelled to restore that integrity, we share a responsibility: to stay true to the original design, materials and workmanship. At House of Antique Hardware, there are no short cuts to reproducing the past. We have one of the largest selections of original and authentic reproduction hardware on the web, and sales staff dedicated to matching the most faithful restoration project.

doodlemor

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1086 on: April 26, 2014, 02:57:41 PM »
Doodlemor, tell your husband about this place: http://www.houseofantiquehardware.com/square-head-nails?GCID=S14464x015KEYWORD=old%20fashioned%20square%20nailspartner=gpc&gclid=CJCVwPTn_r0CFcRefgodhB4Apg

Here is their mission; he might really like it: At House of Antique Hardware we believe period homes were designed and built with a rare integrity. For those of us compelled to restore that integrity, we share a responsibility: to stay true to the original design, materials and workmanship. At House of Antique Hardware, there are no short cuts to reproducing the past. We have one of the largest selections of original and authentic reproduction hardware on the web, and sales staff dedicated to matching the most faithful restoration project.

Thanks Amara, I will.  He does like for things to be as authentic as possible.

esposita

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1087 on: April 26, 2014, 02:57:49 PM »
My favorite bridal shower gift these days is a set of Pyrex baking dishes with the couple's monogram etched on the bottom. The set I like does not come in a box, so it is very hard to wrap and too heavy for a bag. I've started wrapping them in flour-sack towels. They don't look fancy, but at least they're practical.

Have you tried putting them in a really pretty reusable shopping tote? Grocery stores often offer bags that are tasteful and not just a huge logo. I have started giving my go-to baby shower gift (diapers and then a treat for mommy) in totes, so that even the bag is a useful gift!

Not that there's anything wrong with flour-sack towels, I would love that gift-wrapping!!! But a bag might be easier for transport if that were a concern for you.

mrs_deb

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1088 on: April 26, 2014, 03:19:04 PM »
He saw me cleaning one time and had a fit.  I was supposed to be taking the nails out of the paneling and straightening them out so he could reuse them.  Clue "the look".

Nails went into the trash.

We save the screws when striking a set, but nails, and straightening them?  You'd have to pay me to do that :-).

Sirius

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1089 on: April 26, 2014, 03:49:04 PM »
...    He came to our open house and spent the ENTIRE TIME muttering under his breath about "can't believe anyone would pay 100k, my entire house only cost $7000, ridiculous amount of money, can't believe it, absurd amount of money, blah blah blah..."

I wonder if he'll still feel that way when the time comes that he wants/needs to sell his house!   ;D

After my aunt's passing my dad offered to buy her house from the estate at the original asking price...$1500 in 1934.  My aunt passed away in 2012.  I told my dad, "Nice try."  (I was the executor, and eventually sold the house for $60,000, which was a good price in the area where she lived for the amount of work the house needed.)

Lorelei_Evil

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1090 on: April 26, 2014, 03:55:37 PM »
My favorite bridal shower gift these days is a set of Pyrex baking dishes with the couple's monogram etched on the bottom. The set I like does not come in a box, so it is very hard to wrap and too heavy for a bag. I've started wrapping them in flour-sack towels. They don't look fancy, but at least they're practical.

Have you tried putting them in a really pretty reusable shopping tote? Grocery stores often offer bags that are tasteful and not just a huge logo. I have started giving my go-to baby shower gift (diapers and then a treat for mommy) in totes, so that even the bag is a useful gift!

Not that there's anything wrong with flour-sack towels, I would love that gift-wrapping!!! But a bag might be easier for transport if that were a concern for you.

LL Bean does great zipper top tote bags.  You can have those monogrammed as well and they come in a lot of colors in a few different sizes.  I love them for gifts. 

Sirius

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1091 on: April 26, 2014, 03:59:45 PM »
I like the idea of a reusable piņata.  If it's reasonably salvageable, keeping the thing makes perfect sense. 

I've heard of young children who had a bit of distress when a piņata in the shape of an animal or person was destroyed.  Having Elmo attend several parties is a nice idea. 

We also keep and reuse gift bags. So long as they're in decent condition, they can be used to package gifts for others.  If the seams are starting to go, we'll tape them up and use them to package gifts for each other.  There's nothing wrong with that.

We keep and reuse gift bags, too.  We got lots of mileage out of the ones we got wedding gifts in, and were still using them five years later.  I liked the ones that were solid colored or not specifically for a wedding, because those could be used for anything.

Sirius

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1092 on: April 26, 2014, 04:09:47 PM »
My favorite bridal shower gift these days is a set of Pyrex baking dishes with the couple's monogram etched on the bottom. The set I like does not come in a box, so it is very hard to wrap and too heavy for a bag. I've started wrapping them in flour-sack towels. They don't look fancy, but at least they're practical.

Have you tried putting them in a really pretty reusable shopping tote? Grocery stores often offer bags that are tasteful and not just a huge logo. I have started giving my go-to baby shower gift (diapers and then a treat for mommy) in totes, so that even the bag is a useful gift!

Not that there's anything wrong with flour-sack towels, I would love that gift-wrapping!!! But a bag might be easier for transport if that were a concern for you.

I sew tote bags out of remnants and use those for gift bags.  The only problem with this is that people know I do it, so it's obvious who the gift is from.  (Last Christmas for a white elephant party I gave a gift that I wrapped in a box that had held sifting kitty litter liners.  Nice strong box.  The recipient said the type of box was a dead giveaway that it was from us, the local cat owners.)

rose red

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1093 on: April 26, 2014, 07:52:59 PM »
I think I told this story here before, but I was once at the Lindt cafe. Those of you who know your Lindt might know that they sell their famous Lindor chocolate balls by the weight. So this one gentleman wanted to purchase a single Lindor ball. When she weighed it, it came up to about 11g, therefore costing $1.20. He insisted that the last time he was there, it had only weighed say 10g and cost $1.10. So he pulled out a different ball and demanded she weigh it. The remarkably patient cashier explained that they would all weigh the same, but he was only convinced after she weighed 3 separate balls.

The clincher was that there was a plate with about eight cookies as free samples. After he verified that they were indeed completely free, he took all eight cookies.

Over $1 for one chocolate ball? Yikes!

I was going to write a whole post of outrage, but then I notice from your profile that you're in Australia so perhaps that price is normal for chocolate.

zyrs

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1094 on: April 26, 2014, 08:07:08 PM »
Before the local refuse utility put a weight limit on the garbage cans one of our (the children) jobs growing up was to get into the garbage can and jump around in it to compress the garbage so dad wouldn't have to pay for a second can.