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Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 540177 times)

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RegionMom

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1095 on: April 26, 2014, 09:10:12 PM »
Huh- I know some people that try NOT to use the restroom at work/school, for personal reasons.  Wonder if I could mention the cheapskate method to get them to "give it a whirl?"  LOL

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jedikaiti

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1096 on: April 26, 2014, 09:32:12 PM »
Maybe having to carry one bag instead instead of 2 or 3.

I think it was George Carlin(?) who had a funny one-liner in his routine when trash compactors were popular: it turns 30 pounds of trash into 30 pounds of trash.  ;D
[/quote

Yea, but it keeps the dog out of it.
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doodlemor

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1097 on: April 26, 2014, 10:24:17 PM »
Before the local refuse utility put a weight limit on the garbage cans one of our (the children) jobs growing up was to get into the garbage can and jump around in it to compress the garbage so dad wouldn't have to pay for a second can.

LOL!!  We pay by the bag (although we have free recycling of anything that can be recycled).  We STILL stand in the wastebaskets to compress the trash as much as possible!  You'd think we'd outgrow that, but nah.  We're in our seventies and still do it.  I guess we're practicing for that "one foot in the grave" pose.   ;D

My husband does that, too.  He gets his money's worth for every sticker on a bag. 


Elfmama

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1098 on: April 27, 2014, 12:10:48 AM »
A certain relative used to try to go to the bathroom at work only, not at home, so that it was not his TP or water being used......
Did he claim to have taken home 10 years worth of toilet paper in one trip on his bicycle?  A guy claimed that on another forum, and the only way I can see that is if he did most of his business at work. 
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Venus193

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1099 on: April 27, 2014, 07:13:21 AM »
A certain relative used to try to go to the bathroom at work only, not at home, so that it was not his TP or water being used......

Wow. You win.

Ok, now I've heard everything!





AmethystAnne

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1100 on: April 27, 2014, 09:46:06 AM »
Maybe having to carry one bag instead instead of 2 or 3.

I think it was George Carlin(?) who had a funny one-liner in his routine when trash compactors were popular: it turns 30 pounds of trash into 30 pounds of trash.  ;D
[/quote

Yea, but it keeps the dog out of it.

^
Very true!

Margo

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1101 on: April 27, 2014, 11:03:11 AM »
I think I told this story here before, but I was once at the Lindt cafe. Those of you who know your Lindt might know that they sell their famous Lindor chocolate balls by the weight. So this one gentleman wanted to purchase a single Lindor ball. When she weighed it, it came up to about 11g, therefore costing $1.20. He insisted that the last time he was there, it had only weighed say 10g and cost $1.10. So he pulled out a different ball and demanded she weigh it. The remarkably patient cashier explained that they would all weigh the same, but he was only convinced after she weighed 3 separate balls.

The clincher was that there was a plate with about eight cookies as free samples. After he verified that they were indeed completely free, he took all eight cookies.


Over $1 for one chocolate ball? Yikes!

I was going to write a whole post of outrage, but then I notice from your profile that you're in Australia so perhaps that price is normal for chocolate.

I think they work out about 60p each here (UK) if you buy them individually, but they are worth it! Here, they're definitely not the cheapest chocolate yo can get but the are so nice i don't care ;-) (reminds me, I have a dark chocolate Lindt bunny I got for Eaaster and haven't started yet. . .

rose red

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1102 on: April 27, 2014, 11:47:01 AM »
I think I told this story here before, but I was once at the Lindt cafe. Those of you who know your Lindt might know that they sell their famous Lindor chocolate balls by the weight. So this one gentleman wanted to purchase a single Lindor ball. When she weighed it, it came up to about 11g, therefore costing $1.20. He insisted that the last time he was there, it had only weighed say 10g and cost $1.10. So he pulled out a different ball and demanded she weigh it. The remarkably patient cashier explained that they would all weigh the same, but he was only convinced after she weighed 3 separate balls.

The clincher was that there was a plate with about eight cookies as free samples. After he verified that they were indeed completely free, he took all eight cookies.


Over $1 for one chocolate ball? Yikes!

I was going to write a whole post of outrage, but then I notice from your profile that you're in Australia so perhaps that price is normal for chocolate.

I think they work out about 60p each here (UK) if you buy them individually, but they are worth it! Here, they're definitely not the cheapest chocolate yo can get but the are so nice i don't care ;-) (reminds me, I have a dark chocolate Lindt bunny I got for Eaaster and haven't started yet. . .

Oh yes, I know there're worth it ;D. I'm lucky they're not too pricey here (or is that unlucky since I eat too much ;)) In the US, they are 3 for $1 or $3 (on sale) for a bag.

snowfire

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1103 on: April 27, 2014, 02:52:18 PM »
Nope, said relative didn't take home TP on a bike. (Would have liked to have seen someone try to take that much, though.)  They have done a truly cosmic amount of cheapskate stuff, though.  Some of which has had not so great side effects on other people.  (Lying about age of a child to get cheaper rates...resulting in child being grouped with those 2-3 years younger for activities & bored stiff.)

shhh its me

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1104 on: April 27, 2014, 03:23:53 PM »
 Side note ever time this thread mentions TP , my add changes to one for a commercial waste removal company.

rose red

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1105 on: April 27, 2014, 08:32:46 PM »
I'm reminded of an aunt who drives about half hour and waste gas to put her garbage with ours because her area has a limit and ours didn't.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1106 on: April 27, 2014, 08:50:48 PM »
Actually, according to the article, the yeast breaks down the alcohol before it gets absorbed - well, some of it. Bread, it seems to me, would just absorb it and delay absorption by your body. Someone who knows better can feel free to correct me.

Personally, I drink beer because I love the taste, and while the milder effects (tongue loosening, relaxant) are pleasant, I do not enjoy inebriation. And since the beers I really like tend to have higher ABV (alcohol by volume), and don't come in non-alcohol versions, well, I may be testing out the yeast trick very soon.

Yeast doesn't metabolize alcohol. Alcohol is a by-product of yeast metabolism; that's what fermentation is. Yeast-pee if you will. Some yeast strains can survive in the human gut. There's a documented phenomenon of people being drunk without drinking. Their flora produce enough alcohol to intoxicate them.

Most yeasts die off at fairly low alcohol concentration. It depends on the strain but your average baking yeast probably gives up around 4% ABV. Wine yeasts can survive up to about 14%.

There are bacteria that metabolize alcohol. Saccaromyces sanfrancisco is what makes sourdough in a symbiotic relationship with the yeast. "Mother of vinegar" contains alcohol eating bacteria, resulting in vinegar.

I doubt that eating yeast can prevent or limit intoxication. Eating any kind of food will slow alcohol absorbtion.

per the bolded, i do know someone who after 1 beer is beyond tipsy, yet wine barely affects them.

I swear this feels like the perfect placement for some Cliff Clavin "wisdom" but for the life of me I can't think of anything.  Though someone did share recently on fbook Cliff's logic for why some people feel smarter after having a few beers.



On a non-related topic, I confess to not wanting to pay the fee for some Power Wheels toys that had broken down.  Actually the PW motorcycle had been dumped on us already missing its battery and plastic seat.  I suspect when neighbor was moving, they didn't want to take it with them but didn't want to pay to dump it either.  My middle child is the Mr. Tim The Toolman Taylor of the household, Mr. Packrat and my Mr. "Don't dump it mom cause I think I can find a use for everything!" child.

In the interest of making our backyard look less tacky I put my foot down and said the broken down toys had to go so I packed them into the van and drove the 30 miles to another town's recycling center after finding out they would recycle large toys that wouldn't get picked up by curbside pickup and they'd take them for free! :D :D
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Slartibartfast

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1107 on: April 27, 2014, 10:27:43 PM »
A man at my parents' church was a delivery driver for a paper mill for 40+ years.  This particular mill made toilet paper.  Sometimes there would be issues - a roll wouldn't get glued quite right, or there would be a problem with the machine and it'd be 2/3 its intended size, or whatever.  The mill let him take these rolls home in his own truck.  (Keep in mind, a "roll" in this case is ~12 feet long!)  It wasn't a scheduled thing, but it was apparently pretty frequent.

This guy would get the rolls home, cut them up on the bandsaw in his workshop, and give out garbage bags full of toilet paper for Christmas presents for his family.  Pretty much every year.

Worse, he didn't want to waste any, so he'd save all the scraps from that and keep a bag in each bathroom in the house.  Visitors (I never saw it, but my parents were at his house a few times) were expected to just dig out a scrap of about the right size from the bag - he never even kept actual rolls around, homemade or no.

He retired when I was still pretty small, but I wonder whether he still got to take home the "factory seconds" or whether that honor went to the new delivery driver . . .

Margo

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1108 on: April 28, 2014, 03:40:14 AM »
I have to say, I don't see that as particularly cheapskate. A garbage bag full of rolls of TP isn't an exciting christmas gift, but his family may have been perfectly happy to have something useful rather than knick-knacks.

With the bag - depends how small the pieces are. But if they are as big or bigger tan normal sheets I don't see the issue. Why would anyone 'dig' rather than just taking the top piece/es? Obviously it would be more of an issue if we are talking about tiny scraps of paper, but it doesn't sound that way from the description.


chibichan

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1109 on: April 28, 2014, 04:19:52 AM »

I swear this feels like the perfect placement for some Cliff Clavin "wisdom" but for the life of me I can't think of anything.  Though someone did share recently on fbook Cliff's logic for why some people feel smarter after having a few beers.




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Sorry , but someone had to do it ....
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