Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 216845 times)

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rose red

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1110 on: April 27, 2014, 09:32:46 PM »
I'm reminded of an aunt who drives about half hour and waste gas to put her garbage with ours because her area has a limit and ours didn't.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1111 on: April 27, 2014, 09:50:48 PM »
Actually, according to the article, the yeast breaks down the alcohol before it gets absorbed - well, some of it. Bread, it seems to me, would just absorb it and delay absorption by your body. Someone who knows better can feel free to correct me.

Personally, I drink beer because I love the taste, and while the milder effects (tongue loosening, relaxant) are pleasant, I do not enjoy inebriation. And since the beers I really like tend to have higher ABV (alcohol by volume), and don't come in non-alcohol versions, well, I may be testing out the yeast trick very soon.

Yeast doesn't metabolize alcohol. Alcohol is a by-product of yeast metabolism; that's what fermentation is. Yeast-pee if you will. Some yeast strains can survive in the human gut. There's a documented phenomenon of people being drunk without drinking. Their flora produce enough alcohol to intoxicate them.

Most yeasts die off at fairly low alcohol concentration. It depends on the strain but your average baking yeast probably gives up around 4% ABV. Wine yeasts can survive up to about 14%.

There are bacteria that metabolize alcohol. Saccaromyces sanfrancisco is what makes sourdough in a symbiotic relationship with the yeast. "Mother of vinegar" contains alcohol eating bacteria, resulting in vinegar.

I doubt that eating yeast can prevent or limit intoxication. Eating any kind of food will slow alcohol absorbtion.

per the bolded, i do know someone who after 1 beer is beyond tipsy, yet wine barely affects them.

I swear this feels like the perfect placement for some Cliff Clavin "wisdom" but for the life of me I can't think of anything.  Though someone did share recently on fbook Cliff's logic for why some people feel smarter after having a few beers.



On a non-related topic, I confess to not wanting to pay the fee for some Power Wheels toys that had broken down.  Actually the PW motorcycle had been dumped on us already missing its battery and plastic seat.  I suspect when neighbor was moving, they didn't want to take it with them but didn't want to pay to dump it either.  My middle child is the Mr. Tim The Toolman Taylor of the household, Mr. Packrat and my Mr. "Don't dump it mom cause I think I can find a use for everything!" child.

In the interest of making our backyard look less tacky I put my foot down and said the broken down toys had to go so I packed them into the van and drove the 30 miles to another town's recycling center after finding out they would recycle large toys that wouldn't get picked up by curbside pickup and they'd take them for free! :D :D
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Slartibartfast

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1112 on: April 27, 2014, 11:27:43 PM »
A man at my parents' church was a delivery driver for a paper mill for 40+ years.  This particular mill made toilet paper.  Sometimes there would be issues - a roll wouldn't get glued quite right, or there would be a problem with the machine and it'd be 2/3 its intended size, or whatever.  The mill let him take these rolls home in his own truck.  (Keep in mind, a "roll" in this case is ~12 feet long!)  It wasn't a scheduled thing, but it was apparently pretty frequent.

This guy would get the rolls home, cut them up on the bandsaw in his workshop, and give out garbage bags full of toilet paper for Christmas presents for his family.  Pretty much every year.

Worse, he didn't want to waste any, so he'd save all the scraps from that and keep a bag in each bathroom in the house.  Visitors (I never saw it, but my parents were at his house a few times) were expected to just dig out a scrap of about the right size from the bag - he never even kept actual rolls around, homemade or no.

He retired when I was still pretty small, but I wonder whether he still got to take home the "factory seconds" or whether that honor went to the new delivery driver . . .

Margo

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1113 on: April 28, 2014, 04:40:14 AM »
I have to say, I don't see that as particularly cheapskate. A garbage bag full of rolls of TP isn't an exciting christmas gift, but his family may have been perfectly happy to have something useful rather than knick-knacks.

With the bag - depends how small the pieces are. But if they are as big or bigger tan normal sheets I don't see the issue. Why would anyone 'dig' rather than just taking the top piece/es? Obviously it would be more of an issue if we are talking about tiny scraps of paper, but it doesn't sound that way from the description.


chibichan

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1114 on: April 28, 2014, 05:19:52 AM »

I swear this feels like the perfect placement for some Cliff Clavin "wisdom" but for the life of me I can't think of anything.  Though someone did share recently on fbook Cliff's logic for why some people feel smarter after having a few beers.




"Due to the shape of the North American elk's esophagus, even if it could speak, it could not pronounce the word lasagna."

Sorry , but someone had to do it ....
The key to avoiding trouble is to learn to recognize it from a distance.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1115 on: April 28, 2014, 07:53:01 AM »

I swear this feels like the perfect placement for some Cliff Clavin "wisdom" but for the life of me I can't think of anything.  Though someone did share recently on fbook Cliff's logic for why some people feel smarter after having a few beers.




"Due to the shape of the North American elk's esophagus, even if it could speak, it could not pronounce the word lasagna."

Sorry , but someone had to do it ....

And I read that in Cliff Clavin's voice. :)
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

cicero

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1116 on: April 29, 2014, 06:19:30 AM »
whew. just go to the end. I don't remember if i submitted these stories about Ex husband but here goes:

*When we traveled we stayed at a certain hotel chain where ex had the highest level and so we always got free upgrades etc. This usually included business lounge acess which usually served breakfast, all day hot beverages and cookies/fruit, and a "happy hour".  now happy hour was not a meal, unless your name is Mr. Cicero's-Ex. Happy hour was limited soft drinks, maybe wine (i really dont' remember) and a few snacks (finger foods). yup - we all had to be there to get our one drink even if we didn't want it, and eat the little snacks because "that was dinner". "who needs to eat after *all that food*?" seriously, a bite sized round of bread with a smidgeon of smoked salmon isn't dinner.

*he traveled a lot "for business" (what business that was is anyone's guesss but it kept him very busy). he was very cheap in gift buying. so he would usually end up bringing me back whatever "special" was sold on the plane - junky earrings or watches usually. one time he brought me back something really nice - not my taste or style but very very chic and expensive (a designer item). i was surprised but pleased. until... one day we had a guest for lunch and they two guys were comparing airline stories - you know, "how i got the airline to upgrade/give me more/reimburse me " etc. so he tells this story about how on one flight the entertainment system didn't work on their section so the entire section got a 100$ voucher to buy anything on their in flight duty free shop, and then he turns to me and says "and that's how you got that scarf and pin" thinking i would be pleased. my face must have shown my shock so he tried to back track and said "oh but of course i had to add more money to it" which i knew was a lie.

*when we got drinks at a fast food place he tried to make us get them without ice because you get more drink without the ice. but we like our ice and were willing to drink less ::)

*as i said, he traveled a lot "for business". one year we were having a family celebration and i wanted to go, he wasn't go to go but he didn't want me to go either "because we don't have any money". i finally got him to agree but he told me that i could only spend X $, no more. (I don't remember how much but it wasn't a lot of money). I scrimped on everything - lugged bottles of water, bought 1 dollar coffee/bagel combos from the pushcarts, etc. when he came back from his next trip, i happened to see some of his bills and reciepts - take out food, his hotel bill that included mini bar junk like macademia nuts, car rental etc.

there are more, lots more.

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Runningstar

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1117 on: April 29, 2014, 06:40:05 AM »
A certain relative used to try to go to the bathroom at work only, not at home, so that it was not his TP or water being used......

When I still lived with relatives, we had a neighbor that came over every morning to visit - but first had to use the bathroom.  Then she would brag that she had not bought t.paper in years & that one roll lasted her for months.   

Cali.in.UK

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1118 on: April 29, 2014, 07:38:00 AM »
My entire extended family lives on the east coast, so we don't see them very often and are not very close. My one uncle, married with two kids is the wealthiest person in the family. He and his wife both have high paying jobs but he is by far the cheapest person I've dealt with. When they come to the west coast they always stay with my family in our small house, never bring anything, pay for anything. One time my uncle offered to take my dad out for a beer to "thank him" for the free accommodation and when the bill came? He paid for his own drink and went to the bathroom.
But the worst they did is this past summer he and his family were traveling near where my sister lives and said they wanted to stay with her and her boyfriend in their small two bedroom, one bathroom apartment. My sister said it would probably be too crowded but they wouldn't take no for an answer. They insisted that they missed her and she was "faaaamily" so they would stay with her.
They stayed four days, the night that they offered to buy pizza, my uncle asked for the cheapest pizza place and refused to buy more than two small pizzas, so everyone got one slice and a half. Then the day they left he told my sister he "left a present" for her in the kitchen, which surprised her, until she arrived back from dropping them at the airport and found a pile of local maps and tourist information that he "gave her" instead of throwing away. She has never received a thank you note or call since they stayed.

Cherry91

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1119 on: April 29, 2014, 09:45:25 AM »
I made it! It's taken me three days (on and off) to get from start to end but I did it!

It's quite funny encountering posts from what is now the halfway point or before going "Finished!" while I'm going "I've still got 40 pages!"

Still, at least now I'll get the updates.

hjaye

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1120 on: April 29, 2014, 09:48:14 AM »
*as i said, he traveled a lot "for business". one year we were having a family celebration and i wanted to go, he wasn't go to go but he didn't want me to go either "because we don't have any money". i finally got him to agree but he told me that i could only spend X $, no more. (I don't remember how much but it wasn't a lot of money). I scrimped on everything - lugged bottles of water, bought 1 dollar coffee/bagel combos from the pushcarts, etc. when he came back from his next trip, i happened to see some of his bills and reciepts - take out food, his hotel bill that included mini bar junk like macademia nuts, car rental etc.

there are more, lots more.
I'm curious, was he able to expense those bills back to his company?

I have a friend whose ex-husband could be cheap (but not towards himself).  The family had gone out to eat with some other family members who were in town visiting.  Her ex told her they didn't have a lot of money and be careful as to how much was spent on the dinner.  She ended up just eating a salad and appetizer to make sure there would be enough to pay for the kids meal.  Her husband had a regular meal.  So she was pretty hungry when they left the restaurant.  She found out after they got home he had over three hundred dollars in his wallet.  Part of the reason he is now an ex.

Cherry91

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1121 on: April 29, 2014, 09:54:14 AM »
*as i said, he traveled a lot "for business". one year we were having a family celebration and i wanted to go, he wasn't go to go but he didn't want me to go either "because we don't have any money". i finally got him to agree but he told me that i could only spend X $, no more. (I don't remember how much but it wasn't a lot of money). I scrimped on everything - lugged bottles of water, bought 1 dollar coffee/bagel combos from the pushcarts, etc. when he came back from his next trip, i happened to see some of his bills and reciepts - take out food, his hotel bill that included mini bar junk like macademia nuts, car rental etc.

there are more, lots more.
I'm curious, was he able to expense those bills back to his company?

I have a friend whose ex-husband could be cheap (but not towards himself).  The family had gone out to eat with some other family members who were in town visiting.  Her ex told her they didn't have a lot of money and be careful as to how much was spent on the dinner.  She ended up just eating a salad and appetizer to make sure there would be enough to pay for the kids meal.  Her husband had a regular meal.  So she was pretty hungry when they left the restaurant.  She found out after they got home he had over three hundred dollars in his wallet.  Part of the reason he is now an ex.

Ugh, I hate hypocritical cheapskates most of all...

cicero

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1122 on: April 29, 2014, 10:03:51 AM »
*as i said, he traveled a lot "for business". one year we were having a family celebration and i wanted to go, he wasn't go to go but he didn't want me to go either "because we don't have any money". i finally got him to agree but he told me that i could only spend X $, no more. (I don't remember how much but it wasn't a lot of money). I scrimped on everything - lugged bottles of water, bought 1 dollar coffee/bagel combos from the pushcarts, etc. when he came back from his next trip, i happened to see some of his bills and reciepts - take out food, his hotel bill that included mini bar junk like macademia nuts, car rental etc.

there are more, lots more.
I'm curious, was he able to expense those bills back to his company?

I have a friend whose ex-husband could be cheap (but not towards himself).  The family had gone out to eat with some other family members who were in town visiting.  Her ex told her they didn't have a lot of money and be careful as to how much was spent on the dinner.  She ended up just eating a salad and appetizer to make sure there would be enough to pay for the kids meal.  Her husband had a regular meal.  So she was pretty hungry when they left the restaurant.  She found out after they got home he had over three hundred dollars in his wallet.  Part of the reason he is now an ex.
funny you should ask - he didn't really work, though he claimed that he did. he was "trying" to "start" a business - hence these "business trips" (which, if you ask me, were just a way for him to do something). he had worked in the past and i guess accumulated enough miles and stuff so he used a lot of those for his travels. But when we were getting divorced, he told me father that we (DS and I) had cost him over $$$$$ (some crazy amount of money). so my father asked me about this because he knew that i had been working and that we were living in some crazy high level lifestyle. i said, sure, if he flew business class and got a companian ticket for me, then he would figure this at the full retail price not what he actually spent. same goes for hotel upgrades, etc. so yeah, if you spend 100$ on a hotel room, but you are upgraded to a business level room that costs 200$ so it can add up...

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Hillia

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1123 on: April 29, 2014, 10:10:33 AM »
DH grew up in an atmosphere of poverty.  While they always had the necessities, everything was done as cheaply as possible with no thought to quality or suitability.  Looking back as an adult, he realizes that while there was never money for (say) a birthday party at McDonald's ($30?  Way too expensive), there was always enough money for his father to buy a new hunting rifle, or ammunition, or a bow. 

He has a story about how his dad would always gripe that McDonald's was too expensive, and on the rare occasions that they got to go, they were strictly limited on what they could get.  So it was darkly funny the day they went in, and the counter worker greeted his father by name and asked if he'd have the usual.  Seems he was in there 4-5 days a week, getting either breakfast or lunch and sometimes both.  So it was too expensive for his family, but not for him.   >:(

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Free Range Hippy Chick

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1124 on: April 29, 2014, 11:06:26 AM »
I used to have a friend whose husband insisted that lunches for her and her children should be made with own-brand bread from the discount supermarket, and the pre-formed luncheon meats. He on the other hand, was a Working Man (she was looking after 4 children under 12, and childminding as well) and needed bakery bread and proper ham sliced off the bone from the deli. They could drink generic cola; he wanted the brand name. There was a group of four of five families in the area with children much of an age who had frequent play dates together; it got to be well known that all the other mothers, if a child was there around lunch or tea time, would make an extra sandwich and find an extra yogurt and apple. It all came out in the wash - I'll feed Johnny with my children today, you'll feed the Elder Chick tomorrow when he's at your house to play. Even if they weren't there at a meal time, there would be a drink and a biscuit or a handful of raisins or whatever.

Not at her house. At her house, her children got fed and visiting children didn't, not so much as a grape. And not because she didn't want to - she was mortified by the whole thing - but because he wouldn't allow it.

And yes, he too did the thing about the children's toys came from jumble sales and discount stores, but he had all the latest electronics, club memberships, etc etc cont page 94.

He asked me once about doing some work for him when he was supposed to be setting up his own business - he was made redundant, with a big payoff: knew it was coming 9 months before it did and did nothing about this business he was setting up until he was actually sitting at home all day. It was something that involved sending off to the licensing authority for the industry and waiting for approval; he had all the qualifications, and filling in the forms took an afternoon, but then you would have to wait 3 or 4 months for the approval to come through. If he'd done them when he first knew that he was being paid off, he'd have been able to work from day 1, not sat on his behind at home waiting for the paperwork. I went over one evening and talked him through the first stages of what he needed to do, and then said brightly 'now I never contract with my friends, because of conflict of interest and because it makes for discomfort when you know that I know your income and outgoings, so I recommend that you go with Other Accountant.'  I'm glad I did - within 12 months, the word all around town was that he was a bad payer. Questioned everything, always wanted a discount, didn't keep to agreed payment terms.