Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 206368 times)

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Venus193

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #165 on: April 01, 2013, 05:19:08 PM »
Am I the only one who has gotten very little done today because of this addictive thread?  :( >:( ;D  The stories are so good. I've created a monster!  >:D

Don't you just love when that happens?   8)  I read the first eight pages over the phone to a friend who found these stories appalling (but was amused in a disgusted way if that's possible).

A certain ex boyfriend whom I've mentioned before once invited me, a mutual friend, and another couple to dinner at his apartment.  His behavior was so abominable I never wanted to speak to him again but fortunately I don't run into him often.

We were told he was going to make a shrimp and pasta dish.  As usual, the two guys footed most of the alcohol bill (one fronted the case of beer, the other two bottles of wine and assorted chips and stuff.)  I brought a bottle of red wine, raw veggies, a bag of chips, a tub of guacamole, and a cold bottle of Green Goddess dressing because this is what I do.  He greeted us, thanked me for the stuff, and plated and served it immediately. 

Somehow during the four hours we were there he neglected to make dinner.  There were numerous other etiquette violations during the evening; the entire description is here:  http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=58660.0 .

This guy was a serious cheapskate during our relationship.  I have often wondered whether he issued the invitation and somehow decided he could avoid serving dinner.

Magicdomino:

When I shopped for St Patrick's Day at a Going Out of Business sale I picked up some beautiful -- and substantial -- plastic cutlery in gold color.  Eunice tells her guests to just drop those in the sink rather than toss them.

Jules1980

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #166 on: April 01, 2013, 05:35:01 PM »
Heartmug, that is ... beyond weird. At least it sounds like you can laugh at it.


Quote
running out in a rainstorm with a bucket and a bar of soap to wash the car - cheap.

Cheap is mean spirited, taking advantage, using most people's good manners to get away with something outrageous because you know that no one will challenge you.

I disagree and would call this smart--and fun! It's not mean-spirited, it's just taking advantage of a good thing.

I am sorry, I don't think I understand what you mean. You think that using someone's good manners against them is smart and fun? I can assure you might be able to get away with it the first time, but you won't be welcome in my life to try it a second time.

I think she meant washing the car in the rain would be fun, not the second part.

reflection5

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #167 on: April 01, 2013, 05:40:43 PM »
Quote
My co-worker Grace is also very cheap about certain things. She is always getting after people for throwing something away at work that she would have reused, and has been known to pick containers and even food out of the garbage. :X She scrapes the mold off her bread and eats it anyway--I almost lost my lunch when I saw her doing that (at work!).

 :o  Oh, noooooo.

magicdomino

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #168 on: April 01, 2013, 05:46:11 PM »
I may have told this story before, but it fits this thread so well.

My mother, bless her heart, was a cheapskate.  She got this way honestly, starting as a middle kid in a large family, on a tiny Appalachian farm during the Depression.  Add in a spendthrift first husband, and small children, in an era where the good-paying jobs went to men, and one understands how she got into the habit.  Doubtless, there was a time when a Styrofoam meat tray would have indeed been a much valued item. 

Unfortunately, she could never stop saving every penny.  One winter will go down in infamy as the Winter of the Kerosene Stove.    Using a long stick, my mother had measured the level in the fuel oil tank and it was too low.  Convinced that it had sprung a leak, and would have to be replaced, she turned off the boiler completely, and put a portable kerosene stove in the living room.  Yes, boys and girls, she was going to heat an entire 1100 square foot house through a mid-Atlantic winter with one kerosene stove.  Did I mention that the hot water for the house was heated by the same boiler?  No boiler, no hot water.  Just a big stock pot on top of the portable stove.  Ventilation wasn't a problem because the steel casement windows leaked like sieves, but the bedrooms got ice on the windows and mildew on the walls. 

Then a baseboard pipe froze and burst.  Time to give up on this experiment, right?  Nope.  Mother turned the water off.  It was turned on once a day to fill the bathtub and buckets, then turned off.  No indication whatsoever that she would ever get this fixed.  (Up until this point, I had been living there.  No rent was cheap enough to put up with this nonsense, so I temporarily moved in with a sympathetic friend.)   I swear, the only reason the pipe was fixed was that my sister was dating a plumber.

The situation continued at least a month more, when the oil supply company called and asked why the tank was still full.  That's right, boys and girls, the tank never had a leak; Mother had mis-measured.  In fact, it still didn't have a leak when I replaced it 15 years later.   ::)

Jules1980

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #169 on: April 01, 2013, 05:51:17 PM »
No, no. Never, Wolfie.

I meant that running out to wash the car in the rain is not taking advantage of good manners but of nature. Taking advantage of the rain to wash the car.

Oh thank god I misunderstood you! I think I misread the quote tree.

I am wondering though - is there dirt and stuff in rain? So would you need to clean the car again afterwards? I hardly ever wash mine as it is.

If you wash your car in the rain 1) the continued rain will keep the finish wet, so that when it stops, the finish will spot - thereby negating the washing you did and 2) if you do it in a rainstorm, you are adding surfactants (the stuff that breaks the surface tension of water, making it soak into your clothes/dirt/etc. better) to the ground at a time that there's a lot of water being added, making it more likely that the rain will soak down into the earth around you, making mud worse. It's not just cheap, but can be foolish (and you'd go through an awful lot of soap, since your rags would be constantly being rinsed out).

Now, if you want to go DANCE in the rain, that's a whole other thing. Nothing cheap about that - just good, free fun!

I've never broken out the soap and washed my car in rain, but during pollen season, I have backed my car out of the carport into the rain to wash off the pollen.  Otherwise, it's just not worth it pay for the soap to wash your car or for it to be done when it'll be yellow again the next morning.  Of course, I live in Louisiana so maybe other states don't have the pollen problems we have.

snappylt

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #170 on: April 01, 2013, 05:55:54 PM »
I'm not sure this exactly fits here, but I keep thinking of it as I read these stories.

When I was a teenager I visited my first cousin "Jan" and her family for a week each summer.  (Jan was older than I; her own kids were my age.)  Jan was a kind and generous person, so I was surprised - and I particularly noticed it - when she made an unkind remark about her own father (my elderly uncle) taking his wife (Jan's stepmother) our for supper at a nice restaurant.

It was so unlike Jan to make unkind remarks that I asked her about it.  (Looking back, I was probably rude to have asked her, but I am glad I did because I learned something important.)

Jan explained to me that truly, she did not begrudge her stepmother a nice meal at a nice restaurant.  She said her stepmother was, as far as Jan could tell, good to her father, and Jan was thankful that as her father got older that his wife took good care of him.  But, Jan explained to me, "Snappy, you have no idea how hard it is for me to see Dad doing nice things for her.  It is because he never, ever did nice things for my own (bio)mother.  I've asked my sisters and brothers, and they all remember it the same: Dad never bought flowers or jewelry for our mother.  He never took our mother out for a restaurant meal - ever.  Our stepmother deserves nice things - but it hurts so much seeing him treat her kindly when he would never show our own mother those kindnesses."

reflection5

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #171 on: April 01, 2013, 05:58:58 PM »
I heard a story today (after telling someone about some of the other stories), and I had to really think about telling it.  Here goes:

A woman who is not poor, not impaired in any way (just cheap) has a unique way on conserving toilet paper.  She never flushes “gently used” tp.  Instead, she puts it into the waste basket in her bathroom.  Then, she later folds it over and uses it again.  She says most people tear off too much tp anyway and can’t see making companies richer if it’s not necessary.  She also refuses to buy tissues or paper towels.  (I know, I don’t even want to think about what she uses instead.)  Good thing she lives alone.

I have to admit I have never heard of this.  I’ll let the reader figure out what “gently used” means.

edited to cottect typo ("lives" not leaves)
« Last Edit: April 01, 2013, 06:10:25 PM by reflection5 »

kckgirl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #172 on: April 01, 2013, 05:59:52 PM »
Am I the only one who has gotten very little done today because of this addictive thread?  :( >:( ;D  The stories are so good. I've created a monster!  >:D

It's like a train wreck!
Maryland

reflection5

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #173 on: April 01, 2013, 06:02:38 PM »
Am I the only one who has gotten very little done today because of this addictive thread?  :( >:( ;D  The stories are so good. I've created a monster!  >:D

It's like a train wreck!

We all should write a book, start a TV show, or something! ;D

Venus193

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #174 on: April 01, 2013, 06:04:15 PM »

I heard a story today (after telling someone about some of the other stories), and I had to really think about telling it.  Here goes:

A woman who is not poor, not impaired in any way (just cheap) has a unique way on conserving toilet paper.  She never flushes “gently used” tp.  Instead, she puts it into the waste basket in her bathroom.  Then, she later folds it over and uses it again.  She says most people tear off too much tp anyway and can’t see making companies richer if it’s not necessary.  She also refuses to buy tissues or paper towels.  (I know, I don’t even want to think about what she uses instead.)  Good thing she leaves alone.

I have to admit I have never heard of this.  I’ll let the reader figure out what “gently used” means.

Just when you thought you've heard it all....

rose red

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #175 on: April 01, 2013, 06:19:29 PM »

I heard a story today (after telling someone about some of the other stories), and I had to really think about telling it.  Here goes:

A woman who is not poor, not impaired in any way (just cheap) has a unique way on conserving toilet paper.  She never flushes “gently used” tp.  Instead, she puts it into the waste basket in her bathroom.  Then, she later folds it over and uses it again.  She says most people tear off too much tp anyway and can’t see making companies richer if it’s not necessary.  She also refuses to buy tissues or paper towels.  (I know, I don’t even want to think about what she uses instead.)  Good thing she leaves alone.

I have to admit I have never heard of this.  I’ll let the reader figure out what “gently used” means.

Just when you thought you've heard it all....

That's the grossest thing I ever heard.  I'm pretty cheap.  I reuse plastic silverware and baggies, only drink free water at restaurants, and cut open tubes/bottles to get the last drop.  But a line must be drawn!

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #176 on: April 01, 2013, 06:22:43 PM »
I live alone so I subscribe to the adage, 'If it's yellow, let it mellow.  If it's brown, flush it down.'  It does save money but I do it more for environmental reasons because it saves a lot of water.  I don't do this when I have people over, unless it is family because we all do the same thing.  Except after eating asparagus...   :P

But even I draw the line at reusing toilet paper!  Gross...
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SoCalVal

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #177 on: April 01, 2013, 06:32:30 PM »
Oh, I have one!

I used to work in a pharmacy, and a woman came in to return a partially-used tube of an expensive medication claiming it stopped coming out when the tube was squeeze so she wanted a new tube.  The tech took out a new tube, squeezed it a little until some medication came out to prove that it worked then handed it to the woman (really, very little came out -- like maybe a 1/2 cm or less).  The woman then said, "Well, may I have one that's unopened since you just squeezed out some of it?"  The tech replied, "No because you used some of the medication in the other tube before it stopped working so you aren't being shorted anything."  She then asked the tech what would happen to the other one.  The tech said it would be discarded since it was damaged so the woman asked if she could have it back!  Yeah, the tech said no, since it was not good enough for you to keep as it was then it needs to be recorded as damaged and discarded (if anyone's wondering, it was Retin-A when it first came out so I think the woman paid about $20 for the tube).  I think both the tech and I were just incredulous.



baglady

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #178 on: April 01, 2013, 06:36:40 PM »
On that show "Extreme Cheapskates" there was a family that didn't use TP at all. They used cloth rags that got washed and reused. Part of me says that the average cloth diaper contains a higher volume of ... well, you know, and people used those for eons before Pampers were invented, and some families still do, for ecological reasons, so what's the big deal?

But another, larger part of me just says, "Ewwww!"
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daen

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #179 on: April 01, 2013, 06:56:09 PM »
I recall a tabloid article about "Millionaire Cheapskates" back in the day. The visual accompanying the article was of one of the featured millionaire cheapskates and a number of his grandchildren having a toilet paper party.
A toilet paper party, for the unintiated, involved unrolling double-ply toilet paper from the original core, separating the plies as you go, and rolling them onto two other cores. Voila! two rolls of TP for the price of one.

This is a little too work-intensive for me. Besides, where do you get your initial supply of toilet paper tubes?
Actually, now that I think about it, I know enough people who save the tubes for crafts, or some unspecified future date. I'm sure they could give me a few...