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  • December 13, 2017, 11:36:26 AM

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Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 551964 times)

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Tea Drinker

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1710 on: March 07, 2017, 08:58:50 PM »
I use a plain blue ceramic tile as a trivet, but it's one I salvaged myself (from a small stack outside a business); I take pleasure in having trash-picked it, but that works because I found it myself, it wouldn't make sense as a gift.
Any advice that requires the use of a time machine may safely be ignored.

Amasi

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1711 on: March 08, 2017, 12:38:38 AM »
My mum gave me a bottle of tabasco sauce from her pantry.

1. It was black. Tabasco sauce is usually red.
2. The volume was in imperial measure. Our country switched to metric forty years ago

Mayadoz

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1712 on: March 08, 2017, 04:13:52 AM »
One of my good friends, Lucy, was travelling back to the UK to spend Christmas with her daughters and grandchildren.
(Her DH is her second husband and not a big fan of Christmas, so he stayed here in Turkey.)

Lucy's flight left at 7am. The airport is about an hour away, and of course she needs to be there at least two hours before her flght.
At this time of year, the airport buses from town don't run early enough, and there are no flights between 10pm and 7am so it pretty much closes.

Rather than shell out for a taxi or a transfer in the early hours, Lucy's DH persuaded her to get the last airport bus the previous evening. This meant she spent the night on a hard bench in a dark and shut-down airport check-in hall on her own. (None of the shops or cafes were open and she couldn't check in and go through to departures that far in advance.)

Unfortunately I didn't learn about this until after she had left; if I'd known, either I or DH would have gladly got up and driven her to the airport rather than let her spend the night like that.  :( :o

I'm amazed her DH was ok with it, and that she agreed.
Life is short. Buy the shoes. Drink the wine. Order the dessert.

Kiwipinball

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1713 on: March 08, 2017, 08:40:21 AM »
We just moved my Dad in with us.  There were a few things pitched but most of it was OK.  Mainly because I'd been doing a fridge and cupboard clean out at his place every time I visited.

I will admit to being one of those plastic tub hoarders.  But I use them!  I make a lot of soup and stew and chili and they are perfect for freezing them in 1-2 portion sizes.  If a lid doesn't fit properly or something gets cracked, out they go.  Same with the plastic Chinese food and other takeout containers.  I use those to package up dinners for everybody's lunches but as soon as something is the least bit damaged, out it goes.

I don't think it's hoarding to keep something you're actively using. It's the keeping things just in case you need them, even though you haven't needed them for the past 25 years. :)

Hillia

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1714 on: March 08, 2017, 09:26:50 AM »
My FIL is one of those who is willing to spend on himself but not anyone else, though not to the extent that others have mentioned. A perfect example: when DH was growing up, a trip to McDonald's was a huge deal, requiring much begging and negotiating by the kids and griping and complaints from FIL about the expense. They were allowed a hamburger (not a Big Mac or any other sandwich, just a regular hamburger) and either small fries or a small drink, not both.  One day they went in for their semi annual trip, and the counter person greeted FIL warmly by name and asked if he'd be having his usual.  Yeah, he ate breakfast  and/or lunch there almost every day, and not from the dollar menu either.

FIL's mother died a few years ago, and MIL told me he threw a huge tantrum and sulked for days because she didn't want to keep a box of envelopes they found whole cleaning out her house - not a stationery box of 50, but a carton containing thousands of envelopes.  She had to wait until he left to run errands to be able to sneak things out to the dumpster and bury them under bags of garbage so he wouldn't find them.

Shalamar

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1715 on: March 08, 2017, 11:10:14 AM »
I may have told this story before - my mum used to be friends with a neighbour lady, "Marge", whose husband, "Pete", was a huge cheapskate.    Marge was a stay-at-home mum who never had any money of her own, because Pete didn't let her have any.  (My mother's theory is that Pete was afraid that if Marge got her hands on some money, she'd leave him.  I'm betting she was right.)   

Whenever Marge went grocery shopping, she'd pay by cheque and ask the cashier to add an extra $10 to the bill.  Marge would pocket the $10, and Pete would be none the wiser.  (I've since heard that this was very common behaviour for women in that position.)

One summer, my parents decided to rent a cabin at the beach for a week.  Since I was friends with Marge's daughter, they invited Marge, her daughter, and her young son to join us.  Pete dropped off his wife and kids at the cabin and started to leave.  Marge yelled frantically "Pete, wait!  I don't have any money!"  He pulled out a one-dollar bill and stuffed it in her bra.  That, apparently, was supposed to be enough to pay for herself and her two kids for a week.  This was the 70's, true, but that wouldn't have even covered an ice-cream cone each.

When Pete and Marge moved out of their house, he stripped it of everything that wasn't nailed down - and some stuff that was, including bathroom fixtures. 

PennyandPleased

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1716 on: March 08, 2017, 01:43:52 PM »


This is a sad story really.  It sound like you two were really pretty good friends and it is cute that you both were so excited about getting all dressed up fancy in the sparkly shoes and jewelry!  Don't you just hate it when parents' obnoxiousness ruins perfectly good childhood friendships?

I agree! She was a very sweet girl. And her Mom was nice, although she made no effort to curb the husband's behavior. And I recall her nodding in agreement with him during his lecture about "being prepared". I had only met the Dad briefly a couple times but he always sort of seemed like a jerk.

My parents never discouraged me from being friends with the birthday girl after that. But I was a shy kid and I was so embarrassed and horrified after the restaurant I never wanted to see the girl or her parents again. (The Dad caused a serious scene at the restaurant. I distinctly remember people staring at us.) I cried in the car on the ride home.

Not surprisingly the girl was forced to quit the mutual hobby shortly after this all happened. I guess on her last day her parents made a big show about how the hobby was too expensive and a "waste of money" (my Mom told me this years later). Then about 6 months after that they moved several states away to be with aging parents. I remember being so happy that they moved.

Now that I am an adult and looking back, they probably DID have some financial problems. But that does not excuse them for how they acted that night.


Miss Misha

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1717 on: March 08, 2017, 06:24:24 PM »
I had a grandmother who was very frugal. Similar to what many other posters have said, she kept a huge collection of expired canned goods. She also saved every plastic tub or dish she ever came across. Butter, sour cream, etc. She washed them all and stored them in her dishwasher. She never used her dishwasher for washing, only storage. It was completely filled with these tubs. She rarely used them for anything, but she wouldn't throw them out. "Just in case."

I've told this story about her before, somewhere on Ehell. She would often find items in her storage or around her house that she didn't want or need and would use them as Christmas or birthday gifts. We got a lot of expired food from her. One of the funniest gifts was one she gave to my family. A single ceramic tile. Like you would use for flooring. My mom's theory (since my parents believed it would have been rude to ask questions about the gift), was that my grandma thought it was a trivet of some sort.

Jessica, is that you?  BG:  Jessica is my neice and this post could be describing my mother. 

My mother had the dishwasher at her apartment stuffed to the brim with plastic margarine tubs and produce containers. 

Her facility had complimentary coffee and fruit in the lobby for residents and guests.  When we cleaned out her apartment, we swore she had saved every paper coffee cup she had ever used!  Also, her fridge was absolutely stuffed with mini creamers (out of date) and old, shriveled fruit.  If I was crafty, I could've made an army of applehead dolls!

Writer of Wrongs

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1718 on: March 09, 2017, 09:03:28 AM »
...

FIL's mother died a few years ago, and MIL told me he threw a huge tantrum and sulked for days because she didn't want to keep a box of envelopes they found whole cleaning out her house - not a stationery box of 50, but a carton containing thousands of envelopes.  She had to wait until he left to run errands to be able to sneak things out to the dumpster and bury them under bags of garbage so he wouldn't find them.

When MIL died, I and DH and his two brothers had one week to clean out her apartment. We each were keeping a few items, but most of it we were either boxing up to donate or throwing away. The youngest brother (YB) wanted to keep some things to sell. (Neither he nor his wife worked, so he said he was going to sell this stuff to pay his part of the funeral expenses. They also didn't have a vehicle or driver's license, so DH and other brother were going to have to haul the stuff to YB's house, almost an hour away.)

MIL wasn't a hoarder per se, but she threw away very little. All the mentions in this thread of old makeup, worn-out sheets and threadbare towels - right there with ya! So we were hauling out big garbage bags of stuff to the skip at the end of the cul-de-sac.

The brothers went to deliver a load of the donated items, and I kept cleaning. By this time, we had all selected our mementos, and YB had a huge pile of stuff he was going to sell. I came across several packages of adult diapers - open, with some missing. Appeared to be a few years old. Couldn't be donated. I tossed them.

Brothers returned. Cue YB whining that I had thrown out the diapers, which he had planned on taking and selling. (If they needed to use them, sure, but sell? Who's going to buy an open, partial package?)

YB ended up with a truck FULL of stuff. DH and other brother did most of the loading and unloading of it. YB's wife was Not Happy when he brought all this home. And he never did sell any of it - I think most of it was abandoned when they moved from that place.

(YB and his wife could live comfortably on the moochers thread. I may have to share some stories...)
Some day, I hope to get paid to kill people. Now, I just do it for fun.

LB

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1719 on: March 09, 2017, 10:20:26 AM »
Someone in this thread mentioned re-using ziplock bags. I have to admit, I do that. I'll use the same bag for carrots or cucumber slices for two or three days. And I'll re-use bags for crackers or pretzels several times. But I don't re-use ones that have held meat, of course.

NFPwife

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1720 on: March 09, 2017, 10:27:12 AM »
Someone in this thread mentioned re-using ziplock bags. I have to admit, I do that. I'll use the same bag for carrots or cucumber slices for two or three days. And I'll re-use bags for crackers or pretzels several times. But I don't re-use ones that have held meat, of course.

I don't think that's cheap as much as it's green. I don't re-use bags as much as I should and I have terrible green guilt about it.

Hillia

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1721 on: March 09, 2017, 10:40:49 AM »
Someone in this thread mentioned re-using ziplock bags. I have to admit, I do that. I'll use the same bag for carrots or cucumber slices for two or three days. And I'll re-use bags for crackers or pretzels several times. But I don't re-use ones that have held meat, of course.

I don't think that's cheap as much as it's green. I don't re-use bags as much as I should and I have terrible green guilt about it.

I do this also.  As long as the bag hasn't had raw meat in it, it's fair game.

siamesecat2965

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1722 on: March 09, 2017, 10:58:03 AM »
...

FIL's mother died a few years ago, and MIL told me he threw a huge tantrum and sulked for days because she didn't want to keep a box of envelopes they found whole cleaning out her house - not a stationery box of 50, but a carton containing thousands of envelopes.  She had to wait until he left to run errands to be able to sneak things out to the dumpster and bury them under bags of garbage so he wouldn't find them.

When MIL died, I and DH and his two brothers had one week to clean out her apartment. We each were keeping a few items, but most of it we were either boxing up to donate or throwing away. The youngest brother (YB) wanted to keep some things to sell. (Neither he nor his wife worked, so he said he was going to sell this stuff to pay his part of the funeral expenses. They also didn't have a vehicle or driver's license, so DH and other brother were going to have to haul the stuff to YB's house, almost an hour away.)

MIL wasn't a hoarder per se, but she threw away very little. All the mentions in this thread of old makeup, worn-out sheets and threadbare towels - right there with ya! So we were hauling out big garbage bags of stuff to the skip at the end of the cul-de-sac.

The brothers went to deliver a load of the donated items, and I kept cleaning. By this time, we had all selected our mementos, and YB had a huge pile of stuff he was going to sell. I came across several packages of adult diapers - open, with some missing. Appeared to be a few years old. Couldn't be donated. I tossed them.

Brothers returned. Cue YB whining that I had thrown out the diapers, which he had planned on taking and selling. (If they needed to use them, sure, but sell? Who's going to buy an open, partial package?)

YB ended up with a truck FULL of stuff. DH and other brother did most of the loading and unloading of it. YB's wife was Not Happy when he brought all this home. And he never did sell any of it - I think most of it was abandoned when they moved from that place.

(YB and his wife could live comfortably on the moochers thread. I may have to share some stories...)

I may have mentioned this before, but this was my former downstairs neighbor and her kids. She was 90 when she passed away, and had previously moved from a house to this apt, so she had downsized quite a bit. She wasn't anywhere near a hoarder, but really just had enough things to live, like dishes, bedding, towels, etc. Nothing really in excess but her kids had a limited amount of time in which to clean out her apt, or pay another month's rent. Both are married, and each has their own home, fully furnished etc. So no one wanted anything other than the valuables and sentimental items.

Because of the limited amount of time, and the pickyness of many groups that will take donations, a lot of stuff was simply thrown into the dumpsters. And I'm not talking about anything valuable, but her dishes, glasses etc. Yes, they possibly could have been donated, but none of them had time to actually organize and take it anywhere. And the places that came to look at stuff, mainly furniture, as donations, had no interest.

A friend of mine, who has some very odd ideas about things, and can be very cheap herself, had fits that they threw out "all that good stuff" Well, had it been me, i would have done the same. Like I said, they kept anything of value, monetary or sentimental, and had to get it all out in a matter of a couple of weeks.

She still goes on about what a "sin" it was for them to have done that. Sigh.

Sirius

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1723 on: March 09, 2017, 11:38:52 AM »
Someone in this thread mentioned re-using ziplock bags. I have to admit, I do that. I'll use the same bag for carrots or cucumber slices for two or three days. And I'll re-use bags for crackers or pretzels several times. But I don't re-use ones that have held meat, of course.

I reuse the large ones I fill with bulk cat food for my feral cats, and since I wrote the product code on them they're much easier for the cashier to ring up.  However, I wouldn't reuse a bag that had had meat or anything messy in it.  The grocery store where I go has a huge bulk food section, and buying things in bulk but using Ziploc bags with the code written on them results in a lot less mess. 

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #1724 on: March 09, 2017, 04:55:56 PM »
Someone in this thread mentioned re-using ziplock bags. I have to admit, I do that. I'll use the same bag for carrots or cucumber slices for two or three days. And I'll re-use bags for crackers or pretzels several times. But I don't re-use ones that have held meat, of course.

I don't think that's cheap as much as it's green. I don't re-use bags as much as I should and I have terrible green guilt about it.

I do this also.  As long as the bag hasn't had raw meat in it, it's fair game.

Me, too.  I do oven baked 'fries' with potatoes, paprika, oil, salt, pepper tossed in a bag.  I toss out that bag - and use one of my oldest saved ones in the first place.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario