Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 215135 times)

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Nikko-chan

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #180 on: April 01, 2013, 07:08:58 PM »
Oooh! I have one! SunshineSister's friend, we will call her Natasha, and her mother are cheapskates. One notable example? They would take meat they bought, like say a roast or something, and wrap it in an old bread bag, tie it up, and place it in the freezer. It would get freezer burned. And they would till serve it up!  :o

SunshineSister lived there for a short time, so this is how she knows this. She refused to eat it I think, and opted to buy her own fresh stuff, but they would eat it, which is another story entirely.

weeblewobble

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #181 on: April 01, 2013, 07:23:41 PM »
I'm not sure this exactly fits here, but I keep thinking of it as I read these stories.

When I was a teenager I visited my first cousin "Jan" and her family for a week each summer.  (Jan was older than I; her own kids were my age.)  Jan was a kind and generous person, so I was surprised - and I particularly noticed it - when she made an unkind remark about her own father (my elderly uncle) taking his wife (Jan's stepmother) our for supper at a nice restaurant.

It was so unlike Jan to make unkind remarks that I asked her about it.  (Looking back, I was probably rude to have asked her, but I am glad I did because I learned something important.)

Jan explained to me that truly, she did not begrudge her stepmother a nice meal at a nice restaurant.  She said her stepmother was, as far as Jan could tell, good to her father, and Jan was thankful that as her father got older that his wife took good care of him.  But, Jan explained to me, "Snappy, you have no idea how hard it is for me to see Dad doing nice things for her.  It is because he never, ever did nice things for my own (bio)mother.  I've asked my sisters and brothers, and they all remember it the same: Dad never bought flowers or jewelry for our mother.  He never took our mother out for a restaurant meal - ever.  Our stepmother deserves nice things - but it hurts so much seeing him treat her kindly when he would never show our own mother those kindnesses."

That makes a lot of sense.  This makes me think of the "Christmas disappointment" thread from a few years ago in which several husbands forgot or didn't bother buying Christmas gifts for their wives.  If I grew up seeing my dad treat my mom in such a callous, indifferent manner, and then treat his second wife like a precious treasure, I could see misdirecting my resentment at the stepmom.

Julian

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #182 on: April 01, 2013, 07:42:30 PM »

Washing your own car instead of taking it someplace - frugal
running out in a rainstorm with a bucket and a bar of soap to wash the car - cheap.



Unless you're living under extreme water rationing and it's illegal to use town water to wash the car.  Been there, done that.  The neighbours laughed, then thought about it and ran in and grabbed their own buckets!

TexasRanger

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #183 on: April 01, 2013, 08:01:33 PM »
My one uncle, Bob, is has been a borderline cheapskate his whole life. He will scrap the mold of cheese (not just a spot, the whole thing will be a fuzzy green/grey/black brick) and bread and eat the cheese/bread.
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afbluebelle

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #184 on: April 01, 2013, 08:09:34 PM »
No, no. Never, Wolfie.

I meant that running out to wash the car in the rain is not taking advantage of good manners but of nature. Taking advantage of the rain to wash the car.

Oh thank god I misunderstood you! I think I misread the quote tree.

I am wondering though - is there dirt and stuff in rain? So would you need to clean the car again afterwards? I hardly ever wash mine as it is.

If you wash your car in the rain 1) the continued rain will keep the finish wet, so that when it stops, the finish will spot - thereby negating the washing you did and 2) if you do it in a rainstorm, you are adding surfactants (the stuff that breaks the surface tension of water, making it soak into your clothes/dirt/etc. better) to the ground at a time that there's a lot of water being added, making it more likely that the rain will soak down into the earth around you, making mud worse. It's not just cheap, but can be foolish (and you'd go through an awful lot of soap, since your rags would be constantly being rinsed out).

Now, if you want to go DANCE in the rain, that's a whole other thing. Nothing cheap about that - just good, free fun!

I haven't washed my car in over 6 years. I just don't see the point.

So,if I went out and washed my car in the rain, even with water spots, it would still look so much better than it does now.

If you live in an area that salts the roads, regular washing keeps it from becoming a rust bucket.

http://www.detailxperts.net/blog/2012/10/15/cold-weather-car-care-how-to-wash-your-car-in-winter/

Other than that, I'm not really sure. I've definitely loved a couple vehicles that were held together by rust and mud, so they never saw a hose.  ;D

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Outdoor Girl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #185 on: April 01, 2013, 08:10:59 PM »
From what I've read, porous food items, like bread, are not safe to eat if they are mouldy.  But non-porous food items, like cheese, are safe to eat if the mould is cut (not scraped) off.

I will cut mould off of cheese, taking a fairly large margin around the mould.  But then I usually use that cheese shredded in something that will be cooked, rather than eating it uncooked.  I've never had an issue.

I'm frugal; I buy a lot of food when it is on sale and freeze it, where possible.  I save downspout water in a series of 6 rain barrels for watering my garden.  As I said upthread, I don't flush every time, if it is only yellow.  These last two are more environmental concerns with wasting water but it does save me quite a bit of money - $5 or $10 a month.  I gave up my cappuccino habit when I realized how much it was costing me in money and calories.  I will save the little condiment packages if I have extra when done my meal but I don't take extras just to save some.  The vinegar comes in handy when I'm travelling - if I ask for vinegar for my fries in California, I get looked at like I have three heads.   :)
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SamiHami

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #186 on: April 01, 2013, 08:32:06 PM »
No, no. Never, Wolfie.

I meant that running out to wash the car in the rain is not taking advantage of good manners but of nature. Taking advantage of the rain to wash the car.

Oh thank god I misunderstood you! I think I misread the quote tree.

I am wondering though - is there dirt and stuff in rain? So would you need to clean the car again afterwards? I hardly ever wash mine as it is.

If you wash your car in the rain 1) the continued rain will keep the finish wet, so that when it stops, the finish will spot - thereby negating the washing you did and 2) if you do it in a rainstorm, you are adding surfactants (the stuff that breaks the surface tension of water, making it soak into your clothes/dirt/etc. better) to the ground at a time that there's a lot of water being added, making it more likely that the rain will soak down into the earth around you, making mud worse. It's not just cheap, but can be foolish (and you'd go through an awful lot of soap, since your rags would be constantly being rinsed out).

Now, if you want to go DANCE in the rain, that's a whole other thing. Nothing cheap about that - just good, free fun!

I've never broken out the soap and washed my car in rain, but during pollen season, I have backed my car out of the carport into the rain to wash off the pollen.  Otherwise, it's just not worth it pay for the soap to wash your car or for it to be done when it'll be yellow again the next morning.  Of course, I live in Louisiana so maybe other states don't have the pollen problems we have.

I'm in SC and the pollen is one of the reasons I picked the car that I have. It's sort of a beige-y gold color, so the pollen doesn't show quite so much. My husband's red car, though...ugh.

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Mel the Redcap

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #187 on: April 01, 2013, 08:48:24 PM »
Quote
- The friend's mother who will take anything not nailed down in a hotel room.  The management expects you to take the shampoo and soap.  However, taking towels, pillows, ashtrays, the batteries from the remote when possible, that's a little extreme.

Oh for goodness sakes.   ::)

Yep, she really gripes about hotels that fix it so you can't open the back of the remote to remove the batteries, "Like they don't trust their customers, how rude!"   ::)

Gee. I wonder why!
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Roe

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #188 on: April 01, 2013, 08:55:55 PM »
Flipping channels and came across Extreme Cheapskate and thought of this thread. 

A man took his wife to a movie (her idea) and took fruit as his snack as spending money at the theater is very expensive.  The wife wanted a drink and popcorn so he rummaged through the trash and found a popcorn bag and empty drink container.  He washed the drink cup in the bathroom and then took the items to the snack bar for free "refills."   


:o

Slartibartfast

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #189 on: April 01, 2013, 08:57:08 PM »
From what I've read, porous food items, like bread, are not safe to eat if they are mouldy.  But non-porous food items, like cheese, are safe to eat if the mould is cut (not scraped) off.

I will cut mould off of cheese, taking a fairly large margin around the mould.  But then I usually use that cheese shredded in something that will be cooked, rather than eating it uncooked.  I've never had an issue.

I'm frugal; I buy a lot of food when it is on sale and freeze it, where possible.  I save downspout water in a series of 6 rain barrels for watering my garden.  As I said upthread, I don't flush every time, if it is only yellow.  These last two are more environmental concerns with wasting water but it does save me quite a bit of money - $5 or $10 a month.  I gave up my cappuccino habit when I realized how much it was costing me in money and calories.  I will save the little condiment packages if I have extra when done my meal but I don't take extras just to save some.  The vinegar comes in handy when I'm travelling - if I ask for vinegar for my fries in California, I get looked at like I have three heads.   :)

The mold on cheese can go down about an inch, so if you cut off more than that it's fine.  Most of the time, though, an inch is well past the "this looks good" line  :P

afbluebelle

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #190 on: April 01, 2013, 09:04:16 PM »
Wow... and I used to clown on my dad for using the water cups at Taco Bell to get Sprite ::)
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siamesecat2965

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #191 on: April 01, 2013, 09:05:41 PM »
Flipping channels and came across Extreme Cheapskate and thought of this thread. 

A man took his wife to a movie (her idea) and took fruit as his snack as spending money at the theater is very expensive.  The wife wanted a drink and popcorn so he rummaged through the trash and found a popcorn bag and empty drink container.  He washed the drink cup in the bathroom and then took the items to the snack bar for free "refills."   


:o

I saw this one too. he also re-uses dental floss, and his idea of going for ice cream is to go, and take 10+ samples and not buy!  but the movie thing squicked me out.  that's just nasty.

reflection5

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #192 on: April 01, 2013, 09:10:29 PM »
Flipping channels and came across Extreme Cheapskate and thought of this thread. 

A man took his wife to a movie (her idea) and took fruit as his snack as spending money at the theater is very expensive.  The wife wanted a drink and popcorn so he rummaged through the trash and found a popcorn bag and empty drink container.  He washed the drink cup in the bathroom and then took the items to the snack bar for free "refills."   


:o

I think I saw that.  I forgot "Extreme Cheapskates" (repeat episodes) is on tonight on TLC.  But seeing those episodes once was enough, almost too much.  Those people are way "out there".
« Last Edit: April 01, 2013, 09:12:49 PM by reflection5 »

Mel the Redcap

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #193 on: April 01, 2013, 09:17:18 PM »

...   Wasn't there a story here about a woman whose mother refused to put detergent in the dishwasher, so the plates just got "rinsed."  The first time the poster's husband ate at the in-laws house, he got sick as a dog from the leftover residue/germs on the plates?

Disgusting to be sure!   :o

But the water in a dishwasher is so incredibly hot and makes so much steam that it would seem that that alone should at least kill most of the germs. 

Unless she was also running it on the 'economy' setting a lot of dishwashers have, which is a shorter run and sometimes also cooler water (good for more delicate items).
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jaxsue

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #194 on: April 01, 2013, 09:48:17 PM »
Oooh! I have one! SunshineSister's friend, we will call her Natasha, and her mother are cheapskates. One notable example? They would take meat they bought, like say a roast or something, and wrap it in an old bread bag, tie it up, and place it in the freezer. It would get freezer burned. And they would till serve it up!  :o

SunshineSister lived there for a short time, so this is how she knows this. She refused to eat it I think, and opted to buy her own fresh stuff, but they would eat it, which is another story entirely.

My late MIL was cheap and a hoarder, especially with food. She shopped almost every day and had 2 fridges and 2 freezers. The stuff in the freezers was so freezer-burned that it all tasted the same - it was gross!