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Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 610540 times)

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magicdomino

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #240 on: April 02, 2013, 01:53:34 PM »
One thing I just thought of.  I keep seeing crafts on Pinterest for those paint chip samples.  I know you can get a stash when redecorating, but I keep seeing things like Valentines with the same paint sample used over and over again.  Um, so is the idea that you just go to Home Depot and grab a handful?  I keep thinking it's tacky every time I see them.

I'd agree.  It's possible that one might luck out and get a bunch of discontinued samples; no problem with that. 

ScubaGirl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #241 on: April 02, 2013, 02:12:09 PM »
I had an uncle who was slightly eccentric and very cheap.  Some I remember off hand (all of these 20+ years ago):

1.  Had an old fishing boat but refused to take it to the marina for gas as it was more expensive than a typical gas station (true, but the operating costs are higher).  So he some how found a gas tank for a small plane and mounted it on an old snow mobile trailer.  He took it to a gas station to fill up and then drove that moving fire bomb down the road to the family cottage.  He would then use a garden house and gravity to run the gas from the tank on the bank down to the boat in the water.  What a smell - gas fumes every where. 

2.  He got it in his head one day to fly (he was a small plane pilot and owned a small plane) with one of my cousins to Mackinac Island (you can only get there by boat or plane).  They land and spend the day touring the town and the Island.  When they got back to the plane they were greeted by someone who worked there.  He informed my Uncle that there was a cost to landing and taking off (no problem, my Uncle expected that).  It cost $20/engine and since my Uncle had 2 props, the fee was $40.  My Uncle informed him that he can land and take off with just one engine so only gave the man $20 and proceeded to ignore him as they got into the plane and took off - with one engine.

3.  My (very rich) Uncle only bought used cars.  He kept an ancient Suburban to tow the fishing boat mentioned in #1.  The floor was rusted so much you could see the road beneath the passenger's seat.  He was once towing the boat from the family cottage to his old barn for storage when the hitch came lose (old, rusted hitch).  For a while the boat was riding side-by-side with the Suburban down the road.  It ended in a ditch (thankfully a seldom traveled country road).  Oh the pains he went through to get that boat back out.

4.  He became interested in building a single seat plane.  (Thank goodness that it was single seat because there was no way my mother would have let my father (Uncle's brother) fly with him as she knew he always cut too many corners.)  He died before the plane was finished.  He was building it in his living room with the idea that once it was ready for wings, he'd remove the picture window and push it out of the house that way.

5.  He also had an ancient fishing boat in Florida.  That boat had a double hull.  Well, he knew he had developed a hole in the outside hull but decided not to worry about it because there was the second hull.  He went out fishing with my Father and BIL (who doesn't swim).  They thankfully made it to shore before the boat sank.


Luci

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #242 on: April 02, 2013, 02:42:46 PM »
I must admit that we get a chuckle when someone with a $200K motorhome asks us about the gas prices in our state to decide whether to go or not. If you can't use the thing, downsize or quit traveling. There just seems to be an unbalance between the initial outlay and being able to support it.

We have a tiny unit, get 10 to 17 mpg (mountains, you know) and frankly, gas prices are the least of our worries. We took that all into account, plus insurance and motel prices vs. gas + campgrounds and our personal comfort, when we made the decision to by our little baby. I would like to think people who can afford the better unit are smarter than us.

Coralreef

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #243 on: April 02, 2013, 02:44:45 PM »
Scubagirl, that uncle crossed the line from cheapskate to criminally insane!  Towing fuel? Unsafe hitch? Leaky boat? Rusted through car?  I'm not a religious person, but there were numerous dieties watching over that man if no one was killed or maimed!
"It's not the years in your life that count, it's the life in your years." - Office coffee cup.

ScubaGirl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #244 on: April 02, 2013, 03:06:16 PM »
Scubagirl, that uncle crossed the line from cheapskate to criminally insane!  Towing fuel? Unsafe hitch? Leaky boat? Rusted through car?  I'm not a religious person, but there were numerous dieties watching over that man if no one was killed or maimed!

I won't argue with you at all.  But somehow the entire family still has a soft spot for him in our hearts and "Uncle Tom" stories are often repeated.

I remembered another one.  This one got my mom madder than she had ever been at my Uncle:  Uncle Tom had 2 plane jacks that he sold to a buyer in Connecticut (he lived in Michigan).  He had them mounted to a small, old snow mobile trailer (that was not designed for the weight) and hired 2 of my brothers to drive them to the buyer.  The weight of the jacks slowly crushed the trailer springs and some where in Ohio it started to ride on the tires and eventually (inevitably) caused flat tires.  Once they got the tires replaced they found some wood blocks to jam up under the trailer where the springs had been so the tires would be safe.  Well, every so often one of these blocks would slip out so they'd have to pull over and fix it.  They were driving straight through and had little sleep and my one brother just started losing it.   Besides the blocks popping out, the weight of the trailer would actually control the car at times as opposed to the other way around.  In hindsight they know now they should have pulled off the road and refused to drive further but they were young, it was pre-cell phone days and they didn't have money for hotels.  So they trudged on with a very unsafe load, pulling over almost hourly to fix it, resting during the day so they could drive at night with less traffic and fewer police.  My other brother is rather pig headed and he got himself convinced he had to finish the trip.  Eventually they made it and eventually they made it home but when our mother heard about how unsafe it was and my brothers' lives were actually at risk, she had a word or two with my Uncle.

Garden Goblin

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #245 on: April 02, 2013, 03:13:33 PM »
ETA: That actually reminds me of a story.  A coworker went to a restaurant who gives out free hot tea.  She asked for iced tea and they said there's a charge for that.  So she takes the hot tea, ask for a glass of ice, and made her own free iced tea.

I routinely do something similar.  A particular restaurant has a hot tea and an iced tea option, using different teas for each.  I dislike their iced tea, so I order their hot tea and a glass of ice.  Charge is the same for iced or hot.

Virg

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #246 on: April 02, 2013, 03:23:38 PM »
Barb3000 wrote:

"They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her."

Well, she paid for tea and didn't get a tea bag, so I don't think this is cheapskate behavior.  I understand this sort of "it's the principle of the thing" reaction.

Virg

squeakers

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #247 on: April 02, 2013, 03:41:24 PM »
I recently stayed in a hotel that promptly went on my "Didn't care for, won't revisit" list. (Didn't care for the level of cleanliness, food and service lacking etc.)

One quirk I did notice was that the hotel did offer complimentary shampoo and soap - but in large dispensers fastened to the wall of the shower. Perfectly hygienic and all, and no doubt cheaper than providing individually wrapped items, but I did find it a bit off putting in a stingy sort of way.
But I may be biased because by this time I was already less than impressed with the place.

I loved the dispenser at the last hotel we stayed at so much that I bought one for our bathroom.  Those teeny bottles of shampoo barely get my waist length hair washed so being able to squirt as much as I needed was awesome.  And when we travel as a family the 2-4 tiny bottles are not enough for a family of 5 (we get 2 king/queen beds and either a suite with a couch or book a roll-away bed.  Then the boys fight over who gets to sleep on the couch/roll-away.) So we end up breaking out either multiple teeny bottles from our stash (DH travels a lot for work) or we go buy a big bottle that hopefully won't get spilled on the way home.  BTDT and at least it was all dirty clothes that got extra clean when washed.
"I feel sarcasm is the lowest form of wit." "It is so low, in fact, that Miss Manners feels sure you would not want to resort to it yourself, even in your own defense. We do not believe in retaliatory rudeness." Judith Martin

BabyMama

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #248 on: April 02, 2013, 03:41:32 PM »
She also doesn't like people to text her. We don't often because she has dyslexia, but sometimes it's a lot easier to send a text. She hates, hates, hates it when people reply things like "OK" or "Thanks!" and will scold you the next time she sees you, because each text costs her...a dime.

I don't have a text plan so I was very annoyed when people text because it cost 20 cents each (it adds up!)  I've since turned off text so nothing can get through.  So I understand your Aunt's feeling about that although I don't scold. 
See, that's what I'd do - turn them off if I don't have a text plan. Sounds like the Aunt just liked to complain.

She does (she's really not bad, but she does like to fret over things like dimes)--and she's willingly tech unsavvy. Last summer she was complaining about family members not friending her on Facebook. She doesn't have Internet at her house and uses the library because it's free--but she must not go over much because I'd sent her a friend request 11 months before that she still hadn't accepted  ::)

RubyCat

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #249 on: April 02, 2013, 03:43:10 PM »
Barb3000 wrote:

"They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her."

Well, she paid for tea and didn't get a tea bag, so I don't think this is cheapskate behavior.  I understand this sort of "it's the principle of the thing" reaction.

Virg

But I think she didn't pay for tea, she asked for and paid for hot water. There are still costs to the restaurant to provide the cup and the hot water. If she wanted tea in the first place, she should've ordered it. There are corners you can cut at home but are not proper to cut in a restaurant. She tried to pull a cheapie that didn't turn out the way she expected and got angry IMO.

snowflake

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #250 on: April 02, 2013, 03:44:52 PM »
I must admit that we get a chuckle when someone with a $200K motorhome asks us about the gas prices in our state to decide whether to go or not. If you can't use the thing, downsize or quit traveling. There just seems to be an unbalance between the initial outlay and being able to support it.

We have a tiny unit, get 10 to 17 mpg (mountains, you know) and frankly, gas prices are the least of our worries. We took that all into account, plus insurance and motel prices vs. gas + campgrounds and our personal comfort, when we made the decision to by our little baby. I would like to think people who can afford the better unit are smarter than us.

I know someone who makes lots of life choices that are not costly in money, but are very costly in time.  They own a large motor home.  They wish they could take it out more to make things "worth it."  I would point out the irony, but that would probably be just too rude.

Yvaine

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #251 on: April 02, 2013, 03:54:47 PM »
I recently stayed in a hotel that promptly went on my "Didn't care for, won't revisit" list. (Didn't care for the level of cleanliness, food and service lacking etc.)

One quirk I did notice was that the hotel did offer complimentary shampoo and soap - but in large dispensers fastened to the wall of the shower. Perfectly hygienic and all, and no doubt cheaper than providing individually wrapped items, but I did find it a bit off putting in a stingy sort of way.
But I may be biased because by this time I was already less than impressed with the place.

I loved the dispenser at the last hotel we stayed at so much that I bought one for our bathroom.  Those teeny bottles of shampoo barely get my waist length hair washed so being able to squirt as much as I needed was awesome.  And when we travel as a family the 2-4 tiny bottles are not enough for a family of 5 (we get 2 king/queen beds and either a suite with a couch or book a roll-away bed.  Then the boys fight over who gets to sleep on the couch/roll-away.) So we end up breaking out either multiple teeny bottles from our stash (DH travels a lot for work) or we go buy a big bottle that hopefully won't get spilled on the way home.  BTDT and at least it was all dirty clothes that got extra clean when washed.

I've never seen the dispensers, but I would LOVE them. I too have a ton of hair, and so does my boyfriend, and the little bottles are often not enough. Plus it's got to be greener to not have all those little bottles to deal with.

Barb3000 wrote:

"They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her."

Well, she paid for tea and didn't get a tea bag, so I don't think this is cheapskate behavior.  I understand this sort of "it's the principle of the thing" reaction.

Virg

But I think she didn't pay for tea, she asked for and paid for hot water. There are still costs to the restaurant to provide the cup and the hot water. If she wanted tea in the first place, she should've ordered it. There are corners you can cut at home but are not proper to cut in a restaurant. She tried to pull a cheapie that didn't turn out the way she expected and got angry IMO.

She might well have been trying to pull a cheapie, but if I'm reading right, she did get charged for the tea.

NyaChan

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #252 on: April 02, 2013, 03:56:16 PM »
Barb3000 wrote:

"They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her."

Well, she paid for tea and didn't get a tea bag, so I don't think this is cheapskate behavior.  I understand this sort of "it's the principle of the thing" reaction.

Virg

But I think she didn't pay for tea, she asked for and paid for hot water. There are still costs to the restaurant to provide the cup and the hot water. If she wanted tea in the first place, she should've ordered it. There are corners you can cut at home but are not proper to cut in a restaurant. She tried to pull a cheapie that didn't turn out the way she expected and got angry IMO.

What cheapie did she try to pull?  She wanted to drink hot water and ordered a mug of hot water.  She was not told that there would be a charge, yet she was billed as if she was served tea - which is fine, except they should have said that ahead of time. 

Moray

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #253 on: April 02, 2013, 03:59:04 PM »
Barb3000 wrote:

"They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her."

Well, she paid for tea and didn't get a tea bag, so I don't think this is cheapskate behavior.  I understand this sort of "it's the principle of the thing" reaction.

Virg

Well, no, she paid for her hot water, which happened to be the same price as the tea. It's like if I order a slice of cheese pizza and my friend orders pepperoni. Do I get to ask for "my" pepperoni after the fact just because the slices are the same price?

Unless she specifically asked "Is there a charge for hot water?" and was told no, she had no reason to assume it would be free.
Utah

Daquiri40

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #254 on: April 02, 2013, 04:04:40 PM »
My one aunt is really cheap.
-- bought something at a garage sale for 50 cents.  She found out it didn't work so she took it back.  She is proud of this.
-- friends invite my aunt and uncle on a cruise and the friends were paying for it.  My aunt found out the airfare was $200 for both of them and told them no.  My aunt and uncle have money but my aunt does not like to part with it.  Way to tell your friends they aren't worth it.

A guy I worked with brought finger jello to every potluck because it was cheap and then complained someone did not bring brownies he liked.

Another aunt would argue and argue and argue to get a $10 discount at any hotel she stayed at.  The clerks would end up hating her.

My sister-in-law was queen of the regifters.  She gave me a make a potholder set (the colored loops and frame type thing) for my birthday when I turned 36.  She also gave me a plastic frame with dried grass glued on it on my next birthday.  Those were my gifts.  BUT if you didn't give her something expensive, she would pout.