Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 214626 times)

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Sirius

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #375 on: April 05, 2013, 10:29:27 PM »
Washing your own car instead of taking it someplace - frugal
running out in a rainstorm with a bucket and a bar of soap to wash the car - cheap.

As long as the soap is the right kind (which also applies to washing on your own), I don't see a problem. You are not harming anyone by standing out in the rain and, excepting extreme weather, won't harm you either. So what's the problem?

Now, if the person were pushing for all of us to do the same...

Where I live, there are certain times of the year where you either wash your car in the rain or don't wash it at all. 

mbbored

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #376 on: April 05, 2013, 11:34:30 PM »
Quote
I haven't used bar soap since my college microbiology class had us culture used bars of soap.

Is there any way to make sure you get "clean" soap if you do use the bars? I am wondering if agitating the bar in your hands for a given amount of time (30 seconds?) helps to "cleanse" it so you can wash your hands with a clean bar?

The purpose of most bar soaps is to help lift off particles on your skin that aren't water soluble, like oils. Removing the bacteria is best done by friction, which is 30 seconds of actively scrubbing.

Elfmama

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #377 on: April 05, 2013, 11:36:19 PM »
I too use soap slivers for marking quilts - best marking tool ever!  However, make sure tit,s not the fancy stuff with lotions and skin creams - that can leave a greasy residue.
That's why I liberate DH's soap, not mine! :D
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Amara

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #378 on: April 06, 2013, 12:38:43 AM »
Quote
The purpose of most bar soaps is to help lift off particles on your skin that aren't water soluble, like oils. Removing the bacteria is best done by friction, which is 30 seconds of actively scrubbing.

Ah, thank you. I do 30 seconds of hard scrubbing as a minimum and most of the time it is 45 seconds per area (like left arm, right arm, and hands when I clean the litter box. (Yes, it takes me a while to wash up. Mom would be proud.) Much appreciated!

25wishes

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #379 on: April 06, 2013, 11:50:16 AM »
This did not happen to me personally but it is worth repeating ( I think it may have come from Reader's Digest).

A woman is having a yard sale, a customer comes up to her with a whatever, saying "This is marked $.75 -- would you take 50 cents for it?'

Woman looks at it, "Oh, it is actually marked $.25."

"Well, then, would you take ten cents for it?"

Cami

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #380 on: April 06, 2013, 01:03:13 PM »
This did not happen to me personally but it is worth repeating ( I think it may have come from Reader's Digest).

A woman is having a yard sale, a customer comes up to her with a whatever, saying "This is marked $.75 -- would you take 50 cents for it?'

Woman looks at it, "Oh, it is actually marked $.25."

"Well, then, would you take ten cents for it?"

I was having a garage sale. My goal with garage sales is to GET THE STUFF OUT OF MY HOUSE and make a little money on it. My dd's clothes were all on a table and they were all 25 cents per piece. That meant a tee shirt was 25 cents, a nightgown was 25 cents, and a pair of nearly new jeans were 25 cents. It was a bargain and I knew it, but it made pricing easy (no stickers or tags) and it pretty much guaranteed that every item would be bought. I had signs up that read, "25 cents per piece. No exceptions. No haggling." I also had separate signs up that read, "No haggling on anything $1 or less."

So this woman rolls up in a gold Cadillac Escalade -- brand new. Gets ouf of the car wearing designer shoes, carrying designer bag, with designer sunglasses on her coiffed head. Makes a beeline for the 25 cents table. Pulls out a brand new pajama top and brand new pajama bottom. Both are in their original sealed packaging. Separate packaging. They were never ever a set.
She says to me, "Will you take 25 cents for both?"
I said, "No. As the signs say, it's '25 cents per piece. No exceptions.'"
"But it's a pair of pajamas!" she shrieks.
I shake my head, "They were packaged separately -- as you can see. I bought them separately. It's 25 cents per item."
"I'll give you 25 cents for them both."
I shake my head again and point to the sign, "See that? It says no haggling. I mean it."

She tries to keep arguing with me. Over 25 cents. I finally told her to leave my property. And Ms-Too-Cheap-To-Spend-25-Cents stomps off in her designer shoes, slamming her designer sunglasses down on her face and peels out leaving the rubber of her expensive tires behind. Everyone else burst out laughing.

twilight

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #381 on: April 06, 2013, 05:10:01 PM »
I used to work for 2 brothers who were millionaires many times over.  They were obsessed with stamps. Everyday they would check the incoming mail to see if any stamps had accidentally not been cancelled and then they would spend hours carefully steaming and soaking off the stamps for reuse.  They got very upset at me one day when I let a stamp get past me.

However it is my father that takes the cake.  Although he was a cheapskate extraordinaire he was outrageously extravagant when it came to things he wanted to buy for himself.  It always had to be the biggest, best, and most expensive item and he was a big show off to friends and neighbors.  It was a different story behind closed doors where his family was concerned. To keep the electric bill down he instituted a rule that we were not allowed to open up the refrigerator and look.  We had to know exactly what we wanted and had about 3 seconds to open the door, retrieve the item, and slam the door shut.  On several occasions he even timed us. 

He was so obsessed with wasting electricity that without telling me he took my goldfish, which I had bought myself and had for 10 years, and threw them in the brook by our country house (or so he claims- I have a feeling they may have met a more dire fate).  His reason was that the water filter was using too much electricity.

The worst was the toilet paper.  In his mind we were just wasting too much toilet paper so when we would go to the bathroom he would barge in and grab the roll before you could use it.  You got one sheet of toilet paper for #1 and 2 sheets for #2.  A terrible invasion of privacy (especially for a teenage girl) and utterly ridiculous.  My siblings and I had to resort to secretly hoarding and hiding toilet paper.

Even though he could well afford it he refused to get a dishwasher and clothes dryer (as he drove around in his shiny new Mercedes) despite my mother asking repeatedly.  Funny that when she finally did divorce him and he had to do his own laundry and dishes the first thing he did was run right out and get a clothes dryer and dishwasher, both top of the line and insanely expensive of course.

If I take him out for dinner I have to make sure I hand the tip directly to the waitress after I once caught him pocketing the tip I left on the table.  When I confronted him about it he refused to give me back my money so I had to shell out again for the tip.

reflection5

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #382 on: April 06, 2013, 05:23:13 PM »
Itís strange how people will scrimp on very small things (toilet paper) then be extravagant on others, especially for their own benefit.  This also happens in business (making people count paper clips but paying huge salaries).  I guess sometimes (aside from selfishness) the rationale is that pennies add up to dollars.

Glad your mother divorced your father, twilight.  He was abusive, and I don't think I could stand taking him out to dinner - especially in light of the tip incident. 


Iris

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #383 on: April 06, 2013, 05:49:35 PM »
Itís strange how people will scrimp on very small things (toilet paper) then be extravagant on others, especially for their own benefit.  This also happens in business (making people count paper clips but paying huge salaries).  I guess sometimes (aside from selfishness) the rationale is that pennies add up to dollars.

Glad your mother divorced your father, twilight.  He was abusive, and I don't think I could stand taking him out to dinner - especially in light of the tip incident.

This. A few of the stories here have had me thinking about this but this is a perfect, textbook example of what (in my country at least) is now recognised as spousal/child abuse. About 30 years ago or so when they investigated the matter it was found that women in one very wealthy area had one of the lowest levels of personal income in the country because of this sort of thing. You are obviously a very gracious and forgiving person because I don't know that I could go to dinner with someone like that.

Reminds me of a woman I knew who complained that she was tired but needed to go home and make sausage rolls to take to a church function that night. When I suggested that she just buy some she said "oh, but then my husband would ask what I did with my time to justify spending the money". Without thinking I replied "So? Tell him you needed a rest." She looked quite surprised and never discussed matters with me again, so I wonder if she were a similar case.
"Can't do anything with children, can you?" the woman said.

Poirot thought you could, but forebore to say so.

twilight

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #384 on: April 06, 2013, 06:05:51 PM »
I think my dad's brand of cheapskateism had a lot to do about controlling those around him.  When I was younger I really thought everyone had a homelife like mine.  I truly thought it was completely normal.  It was really only when I hit my early 30's and had some distance from those events that I fully realized how completely screwed up things had been.   But it also taught to be financially self reliant as I learned from that experience that whoever pays your bills is the one who has control.

However, my father has tremendously mellowed over the years, now being in his 70's. As an adult I have learned to humor or bean dip some of his more outrageous viewpoints.  Still, I try to limit visits to once a year around his birthday/fathers day and some years not even that.   
« Last Edit: April 06, 2013, 06:10:24 PM by twilight »

GreenEyedHawk

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #385 on: April 06, 2013, 09:00:17 PM »
Before he moved in with me, Anthony lived in a house with three other guys, one of which was the owner of the house.

He refused to turn up the heat so Anthony's tiny little room was always freezing...I loaned him one of my space heaters(I sympathise greatly with this; my old apartment was always freezing no matter what I did) and Richard (the house's owner) promptly took it away because it used too much electricity.  If anyone in the house...besides Richard of course, was taking a shower, Richard would turn the water completely off..not just the hot water but all of it...if anyone took longer than ten minutes. 

Even I was surprised at how much Anthony's health improved when he moved here...at Richard's he never had the chance to be properly clean, nor was he able to get a decent night's sleep, nor did sleeping in a freezing cold room every night do him any good.

I can't even imagine what a relief it was for him to get out of there.
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TootsNYC

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #386 on: April 06, 2013, 09:15:46 PM »
I would rather use containers and lids than wash a zipper lock plastic bag, even once.

Yeah! Me, too!

BabyMama

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #387 on: April 06, 2013, 09:21:18 PM »
A woman was put into the hospital by her abusive boyfriend.

He came to visit her at the hospital.  He brought her flowers.  She noticed that there was dirt on the stems and asked him about it.  He had stopped at the local cemetery to gather flowers that had been left on graves.

A relative was having her boyfriend's baby--they had broken up because he was dating another gal (and who knows how many others) at the same time, didn't pay child support on his other kid, and was in jail/rehab, although they were pretty on and off the whole time.

He didn't show up until the day she left the hospital. All he brought was a package of diapers. He said, "So...I'll just keep these at my house then."

Sigh. She went back to him at least once, I'm not sure if they're together now, but she did just see him and brought their daughter along a few weeks ago.

MOM21SON

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #388 on: April 06, 2013, 09:22:24 PM »
Before he moved in with me, Anthony lived in a house with three other guys, one of which was the owner of the house.

He refused to turn up the heat so Anthony's tiny little room was always freezing...I loaned him one of my space heaters(I sympathise greatly with this; my old apartment was always freezing no matter what I did) and Richard (the house's owner) promptly took it away because it used too much electricity.  If anyone in the house...besides Richard of course, was taking a shower, Richard would turn the water completely off..not just the hot water but all of it...if anyone took longer than ten minutes. 

Even I was surprised at how much Anthony's health improved when he moved here...at Richard's he never had the chance to be properly clean, nor was he able to get a decent night's sleep, nor did sleeping in a freezing cold room every night do him any good.

I can't even imagine what a relief it was for him to get out of there.

What a horrible situation!  I am glad you rescued him.

catbug

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #389 on: April 06, 2013, 11:12:58 PM »
My grandma was a well known cheapskate when it came to spending on others, and totally selfish with purchases for herself. My grandad is blind and has very simple needs. If the food he is served doesn't taste good he just won't eat anything since he doesn't want to put anyone out. When grandma was alive she would read out the supermarket catalogues for grandad to see if she could entice him with anything. Funnily enough she would "forget" to read out the things he liked. Since they lived in a unit at the back of my parents place we could hear grandma telling grandad that his favourite ice creams weren't on special this week. That really upset mum and me so we would make a habit of looking through the catalogues for things grandad would like, then going in and telling him that they were on special, and did he want us to pick any up for him. He would be confused as grandma would tell him they weren't in the catalogue, but we were saying they were. Took a few months of this before grandma would read out the catalogue in full. But if you look in their fridge or pantry you would see brand name liver pate, smoked salmon, water crackers, etc that grandma liked (she liked to eat well), and cheap brand chocolate biscuits, cheap (no taste) ice creams and cheap cereals for grandad.

But it would appear she had been like that all her life. Mum used to tell stories about how grandma would buy clothes for her four girls (mum is the middle child of four girls and one boy, the boy is the oldest), particularly underwear. Four teenage girls of varying ages were made to wear the same size bra, because grandma didn't have time to get everyone fitted properly. So if it was on special and looked like it would fit the average sized girl, they all had to wear it. Problem was mum's youngest sister had implants in her late 20's, and mum has been through 2 reductions and is possibly going to have a 3 at some point. Do you really think these 2 girls would be wearing the same size in their teen years. Mum said when she got fitted for her first bra, she didn't know they were supposed to feel that comfortable after all the years of wearing the wrong size.

Grandma wouldn't spend any money, as she was saving it for a rainy day. Both her and grandad needed knee replacements (both knees for both of them). They got put on a waiting list, but it was going to be a very long wait (probably up to 2 years). It took a month for my aunties and mum (not my uncle) to convince them that the rainy day money that was in the bank (almost 6 figures) should be used. Grandma didn't realise this was what rainy day money was for. She always said she was saving for a rainy day, so that was why they bought things on special, and frequented the op-shop (thrift or charity shops), and used coupons for cheap holidays. In the last couple of years of her life she and grandad (after waiting 3 months for their knee operations instead of 2 years) went on holidays every 6 months, bought air conditioners for each room in the unit, bought new televisions that were big enough for grandad to see something, and also had subtitles for grandma to read (deaf as a post). They improved their lives, like rainy day money is supposed to do. When grandma died, they still had a large sum in the rainy day account, plus still had investments, so grandad can live comfortably for the rest of his life, even if he does have simple needs.