Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 212808 times)

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Elfmama

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #390 on: April 06, 2013, 11:40:05 PM »
My mother had to lay down the law to Dad a couple of years ago.  She wanted to go into an independent living retirement home, so that she could finally retire!  No cooking, no cleaning, etc.  All the things that a lifelong housewife of her era did.  "But we have to save that money for our old age!" Dad cried. 

"Look.  You are NINETY YEARS OLD. I am EIGHTY-SIX.  All that  money for our old age?  THIS IS IT!"
« Last Edit: April 06, 2013, 11:41:48 PM by Elfmama »
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Luci

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #391 on: April 06, 2013, 11:48:09 PM »
My mother had to lay down the law to Dad a couple of years ago.  She wanted to go into an independent living retirement home, so that she could finally retire!  No cooking, no cleaning, etc.  All the things that a lifelong housewife of her era did.  "But we have to save that money for our old age!" Dad cried. 

"Look.  You are NINETY YEARS OLD. I am EIGHTY-SIX.  All that  money for our old age?  THIS IS IT!"

 :)

siamesecat2965

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #392 on: April 07, 2013, 11:59:36 AM »
My mother had to lay down the law to Dad a couple of years ago.  She wanted to go into an independent living retirement home, so that she could finally retire!  No cooking, no cleaning, etc.  All the things that a lifelong housewife of her era did.  "But we have to save that money for our old age!" Dad cried. 

"Look.  You are NINETY YEARS OLD. I am EIGHTY-SIX.  All that  money for our old age?  THIS IS IT!"

good for your mom! 

VorFemme

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #393 on: April 07, 2013, 03:05:33 PM »
My mother had to lay down the law to Dad a couple of years ago.  She wanted to go into an independent living retirement home, so that she could finally retire!  No cooking, no cleaning, etc.  All the things that a lifelong housewife of her era did.  "But we have to save that money for our old age!" Dad cried. 

"Look.  You are NINETY YEARS OLD. I am EIGHTY-SIX.  All that  money for our old age?  THIS IS IT!"

Flabbered my ghast that he hadn't realized that he'd reached "old age" by then......
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

weeblewobble

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #394 on: April 07, 2013, 03:08:32 PM »
A woman was put into the hospital by her abusive boyfriend.

He came to visit her at the hospital.  He brought her flowers.  She noticed that there was dirt on the stems and asked him about it.  He had stopped at the local cemetery to gather flowers that had been left on graves.

A relative was having her boyfriend's baby--they had broken up because he was dating another gal (and who knows how many others) at the same time, didn't pay child support on his other kid, and was in jail/rehab, although they were pretty on and off the whole time.

He didn't show up until the day she left the hospital. All he brought was a package of diapers. He said, "So...I'll just keep these at my house then."

Sigh. She went back to him at least once, I'm not sure if they're together now, but she did just see him and brought their daughter along a few weeks ago.

That's pretty horrid. It reminds me of a former coworker who attended her daughter's baby shower helped her daughter "sort through" the gifts.  What she actually did was take a layette's worth of baby staples home because she planned on setting up a full nursery at her house.*  She took cute baby outfits, diapers, blankets, burp cloths, baby shampoo/ointments and tried to make off with the second car seat that the parents had planned to install in the husband's car so the parents could drive the baby around in both cars before her daughter told her to knock it off and stop ransacking her gifts.

Coworker was highly offended by her daughter's behavior and nothing we said could convince her that taking the gifts from her daughter's shower was rude.  She was entitled to those gifts, too, she insisted, afterall, the gifts were for the BABY and it didn't matter where they were used.

*She planned on the baby sleeping at her house frequently, for no reason, just because grandma wanted the baby there.  This was something she hadn't discussed with her daughter. She was definitely one of those grandparents who saw grandbabies as her "second chance" to be a parent.  And she didn't want to pay for it.

TootsNYC

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #395 on: April 07, 2013, 03:10:17 PM »
My mother had to lay down the law to Dad a couple of years ago.  She wanted to go into an independent living retirement home, so that she could finally retire!  No cooking, no cleaning, etc.  All the things that a lifelong housewife of her era did.  "But we have to save that money for our old age!" Dad cried. 

"Look.  You are NINETY YEARS OLD. I am EIGHTY-SIX.  All that  money for our old age?  THIS IS IT!"

Flabbered my ghast that he hadn't realized that he'd reached "old age" by then......

I'm not surprised, though. My grandpa was once talking to my dad about "those old guys" at church. Which ones? dad asked. "Oh, you see them--they sit in a row at the back." Dad looked, and did a double-take. They were about HIS age--roughly 70 or so. Grandpa was 90.

He just didn't FEEL old.

Hillia

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #396 on: April 07, 2013, 03:25:00 PM »

That's pretty horrid. It reminds me of a former coworker who attended her daughter's baby shower helped her daughter "sort through" the gifts.  What she actually did was take a layette's worth of baby staples home because she planned on setting up a full nursery at her house.*  She took cute baby outfits, diapers, blankets, burp cloths, baby shampoo/ointments and tried to make off with the second car seat that the parents had planned to install in the husband's car so the parents could drive the baby around in both cars before her daughter told her to knock it off and stop ransacking her gifts.

Coworker was highly offended by her daughter's behavior and nothing we said could convince her that taking the gifts from her daughter's shower was rude.  She was entitled to those gifts, too, she insisted, afterall, the gifts were for the BABY and it didn't matter where they were used.


The bolded I would be OK with IF the actual parents were ok with setting up a secondary nursery at Grandma's house. But the first move should come from the parents...'Here, Mom, take these extra onesies/diapers/powder/whatever so Baby has enough stuff at both houses'.  But for Grandma to just start rummaging?  No, no, no.

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25wishes

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #397 on: April 07, 2013, 03:53:13 PM »
I think a lot of these cases are a product of growing up without enough, as in the Depression. Case in point - DH and I went to visit his aunt and uncle who lived 2000 miles away. While there, aunt cooked a dinner for us, her kids, their kids, must have been 10 people around the table. She made one of those stirfrys that you get in a large bag from the warehouse club and just add your own meat.

 BEFORE anyone ate anything, she set aside a portion for her lunch at work the next day. And no, there was not so much that there would have been leftovers. And these were people who were not hurting for money at all.

In DH's family, birthdays were usually celebrated with a Carvel ice cream cake. His mom would get rather upset if there was not enough left over for her to take home. Didn't matter whose b'day it was, SHE had to have some to take home. Got some dirty looks when I asked for seconds. Again, they had enough to buy their own ice cream cake any time they wanted.

Both products of growing up in the 30's.

reflection5

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #398 on: April 07, 2013, 04:02:15 PM »
Quote
I think a lot of these cases are a product of growing up without enough, as in the Depression.
While that may apply to your story, and it might apply to some of the others, many posts are about younger people who didn't grow up deprived or during the Depression.  Some people are just stingy and cheap.

MissRose

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #399 on: April 07, 2013, 04:55:39 PM »
My mother did not grow up during the Depression but her parents did.  Not sure where some of her attitudes came from but the need for control of the finances is something she said she learned from her dad.  When I was growing up, my dad worked full time and she managed the money, and went out to pay the bills with money he gave for them.  Now with help from the phone company etc, they have automatic withdrawals done so no need to go to the bank to pay most of their bills.

MommyPenguin

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #400 on: April 07, 2013, 05:02:16 PM »
To me, growing up during the Great Depression (or being born during it and learning household stuff from a mom who lived through it) is more like my grandmother.  She will dig through the trash and rescue plastic silverware to wash and reuse, save plastic tubs to use again, get all the coupons she can and go to several different grocery stores to shop, buy things used when possible, keep her house cold (and keep an accordion door at the top of her stairs closed so that the heat doesn't go upstairs until she's ready for bed), things like that.  But she also doesn't deny people things that are normal (she buys treats for her family when they go on sale, she turns up the heat for family events at her house, etc.).  I think there's a big difference between trying not to waste money and being stingy, especially as it affects others.  She also doesn't show up at other relatives' houses with storage containers to take food home, and takes food only when it's freely offered.  She *does*, at her house, use all of her saved plastic tubs to send food home with everybody else.

siamesecat2965

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #401 on: April 07, 2013, 05:53:40 PM »
To me, growing up during the Great Depression (or being born during it and learning household stuff from a mom who lived through it) is more like my grandmother.  She will dig through the trash and rescue plastic silverware to wash and reuse, save plastic tubs to use again, get all the coupons she can and go to several different grocery stores to shop, buy things used when possible, keep her house cold (and keep an accordion door at the top of her stairs closed so that the heat doesn't go upstairs until she's ready for bed), things like that.  But she also doesn't deny people things that are normal (she buys treats for her family when they go on sale, she turns up the heat for family events at her house, etc.).  I think there's a big difference between trying not to waste money and being stingy, especially as it affects others.  She also doesn't show up at other relatives' houses with storage containers to take food home, and takes food only when it's freely offered.  She *does*, at her house, use all of her saved plastic tubs to send food home with everybody else.

Yes. my grandmother, and my mom, to some extent are like this. Grandmas was a teacher, but lived frugally, and invested wisely. At age 97, when she went into a nursing home, she had enough $$$ to pay for 5+ years in a private pay home (about 70K per year) for 5 years. When she passed away at 102, she had enough for another year and a half.  She saved, and very rarely spent "frivolously" but she did help me pay for college, and after she broke her hip, and spent several months at my parents, with me helping her daily, she paid of my remaining student loans, several thousand worth.

My mom is the same way; if she wants something, and she feels she can afford it, she will get it. If not, she will pass, or wait until she can pay for it "comfortably"{ she isn't wealthy, but has enough to live on, with some left over for fun and treats. But she's not stingy. She helped me out when my transmission blew up and I had to shell out over 3K to replace it.

I never ask, and don't expect anything, but its nice when she does offer nad help out. I don't refuse, and now that I'm in a better financial position, i will buy her things "just because" nothing major, but she always tells me to stop :)

ladyknight1

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #402 on: April 07, 2013, 06:37:37 PM »
My grandparents were very frugal, but my parents are not. They do many things that actually cost them more in the long run, using paper plates to save from having to wash, refuse to recycle anything, and dispose of perfectly good items. I see myself and my family as being between the two, and leaning toward more frugal living.

JoW

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #403 on: April 07, 2013, 06:48:06 PM »
Frugal
I re-use large zip lock bag, but there is a specific order and I donít wash them.   First use is dry food Ė cookies, bread, or similar.   Shake out the dry crumbs after use.   Second use is wet food Ė typically meat.  Third use is trash Ė use the zipper bag to hold other trash.   

I take home condiments and napkins, but only the few that came with my meal.  When my sub sandwich came with 2 napkins and I only used one the extra went in my pocket and got used at home.

I donít buy garbage bags.  My garbage goes in cat food bags, grocery bags, or any other bag that enters the house full of something else.

Cheap

A few days after we got married DH and I were in FILs town and he took the extended family out to dinner Ė 8 people.   He told the relatives that the meal was going on DHís credit card because FIL didnít have one.  All true.  He also said he would be paying DH cash for the meal at home.  FIL gave DH cash for 6 of the 8 meals.  He expected DH to cover our food.

The water supply to my house is a well with an electric pump.   So my water is, for all practical purposes, free.  I donít use paper plates at home.  I donít like the way they feel and I donít like the environmental impact.   Mom loves paper plates.  She came to visit and bought paper plates for me.  She served sandwiches on those plates, then wiped the crumbs off them and put them back in the cupboard to be used for another meal while I objected.  I pulled them out, tore them in half and threw them out.  Mom was not happy.  Sheís worried about the cost of the water I use by running the dish washer twice each week. 

City water does not reach my neighborhood.  Each house has a well and electric pump.  I supplied one neighbor with water for 3 days, even let her come over and shower in my house, when her pump malfunctioned and her husband was too cheap to hire the well service to repair it. 

wheeitsme

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #404 on: April 07, 2013, 07:02:34 PM »
My mother had to lay down the law to Dad a couple of years ago.  She wanted to go into an independent living retirement home, so that she could finally retire!  No cooking, no cleaning, etc.  All the things that a lifelong housewife of her era did.  "But we have to save that money for our old age!" Dad cried. 

"Look.  You are NINETY YEARS OLD. I am EIGHTY-SIX.  All that  money for our old age?  THIS IS IT!"

Flabbered my ghast that he hadn't realized that he'd reached "old age" by then......

Eh, when my Dad was 78 (he turned 80 this year), he went to look at a couple of those places.  I asked him how he liked them.  His response?  "They're all full of old people!"