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Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 528624 times)

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ladyknight1

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #525 on: April 13, 2013, 10:41:00 AM »
We went through something similar when my GM died. She had remarried after buying the property she lived on and building the house, and the property and house was only in her name. The rule was that her widower could live there until he died, then the estate would sell the property to be divided amongst my mother and aunt.

However, GM's husband began moving in women to help him with cooking and cleaning, and eventually married one of them, W, before he died. W moved her son and his GF into the house, which they promptly trashed. They also sold many of my GM's possessions. It took us three months to get them out (legal process of eviction), and six months to clean the property before we could sell it.
ďAll that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

Jocelyn

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #526 on: April 13, 2013, 06:07:19 PM »
"I just thought you should know you're wife is out here spending your paycheck on shoes," he told DH.

This friend, of course, is a notorious cheapskate, who flips out anytime his wife makes a purchase he doesn't approve of.

Does his wife work or is it a case of "No wife of mine will ever work" so the can control the purse strings?  I bet he longs for the days when all women have no say.
My parents were good friends with a man who had a similar attitude about his wife. One time Mom and the lady were shopping for a particular occasion. Now, Dad has always sort of liked going shopping with Mom, and the other man was there to keep an eye on his wife. The wife tried on two dresses, and she and my parents agreed that one was much more flattering than the other. The husband checked the tags, and then announced that his wife should buy the cheaper, less flattering one. My parents were appalled.

The husband died about 15 years ago and his widow is spending all his savings going out to eat, shopping as much as she pleases, and traveling....with her gentleman friend.  We could probably generate electricity from the spinning her husband is doing in his grave.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #527 on: April 13, 2013, 06:33:50 PM »
Good for her!
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

VorFemme

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #528 on: April 13, 2013, 07:22:14 PM »
"I just thought you should know you're wife is out here spending your paycheck on shoes," he told DH.

This friend, of course, is a notorious cheapskate, who flips out anytime his wife makes a purchase he doesn't approve of.

Does his wife work or is it a case of "No wife of mine will ever work" so the can control the purse strings?  I bet he longs for the days when all women have no say.
My parents were good friends with a man who had a similar attitude about his wife. One time Mom and the lady were shopping for a particular occasion. Now, Dad has always sort of liked going shopping with Mom, and the other man was there to keep an eye on his wife. The wife tried on two dresses, and she and my parents agreed that one was much more flattering than the other. The husband checked the tags, and then announced that his wife should buy the cheaper, less flattering one. My parents were appalled.

The husband died about 15 years ago and his widow is spending all his savings going out to eat, shopping as much as she pleases, and traveling....with her gentleman friend.  We could probably generate electricity from the spinning her husband is doing in his grave.

Too bad she still has to pay for the electrical hookup - because I'm sure that she would relish the idea!
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I explain?

cabbageweevil

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #529 on: April 14, 2013, 04:57:25 AM »
I have a friend who is highly -- what Americans call "cheap", and Brits, "mean" (and he's always had very well-paying jobs).  He's a byword among his friends and family, for his extreme cheapskate-ishness. (He does also have some excellent qualities.)

Many instances of petty penny-pinching on his part over the years, come to mind. One IMO egregious one which sticks with me, is: I was staying at his home one time, and was making coffee for him, me, and I think another visitor. I put in the kettle, well over the necessary amount of water for three cups of coffee, and boiled it. Friend, finding the surplus hot water, insisted in putting it into a thermos flask to keep it hot until a future occasion when hot water would be wanted.

I can "see with my head", the point of trying to measure out the approximate amount of water that you'll need to boil -- though I'm just not capable of functioning that way; but the thermos-flask stunt, frankly struck me as -- to put it mildly, over-the-top.

I used to work for 2 brothers who were millionaires many times over.  They were obsessed with stamps. Everyday they would check the incoming mail to see if any stamps had accidentally not been cancelled and then they would spend hours carefully steaming and soaking off the stamps for reuse.  They got very upset at me one day when I let a stamp get past me.

My cheapskate friend is just the same with the business of soaking off and reusing accidentally-unfranked stamps -- he does it "religiously". The one time I tried to do the same thing: I somehow did not manage to glue the stamp successfully, to the envelope -- it clearly got detached in transit: I was told by the recipient of that letter, that I had forgotten to stamp it, and he had had to pay postage due. (I duly explained to him, and offered to reimburse him.) I took that incident as a message from on high, to the effect that I haven't got what it takes to be an effective cheapskate.

reflection5

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #530 on: April 14, 2013, 05:19:58 AM »
I was half watching/half listening to HLN Murder Mysteries yesterday afternoon and caught something that made me think of this thread.  A woman was shown entering and leaving a store (similar to Lowes) on a certain date and time.  She bought some containers of some kind of acid and a few other things used in the crime.  The investigators explained that the video wasnít clear enough to prove it was her, but something else did:  she used her discount card to save 34 cents.  That helped to prove she bought the items.

Nothing wrong with using a discount card; most of us do it all the time.  But Iíll bet she wishes she hadnít bothered.  Now she's in prison.  ;)

Venus193

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #531 on: April 14, 2013, 06:34:24 AM »
I love that.

The stamp thing makes me remember a boss of a client of my first ad agency who nickel and dimed my company within an inch of his life.  That was back in the days before computers on every desk, the current quality of fax, e-mail, and the internet (sometime during the Roman Empire). 

One day my boss was giving a presentation at their office.  The documents were in duo-tang folders that had paper fasteners inside, a clear front cover, and a white rear cover.  The CEO of the client company took the papers out of it and put the folder in front of my boss asking "Am I paying for that?"

I had never met this man (who never came to our office) so I had no way of knowing whether this was pure rudeness, stinginess, or a power play.  I wasn't at the meeting so I couldn't make any assumptions.  However, the following two incidents told me he was cheap to the point of depravity:

1.  He got really weird about postage.  My firm's senior partner received a memo from him one day that contained cancelled postage ripped off of that week's mail (He opened all the mail in the company no matter whom it was addressed to).  The mail that week was all from different departments in our office and addressed to different people in different departments within the client's company, which was much larger than ours.  The memo -- written on a carbon form -- said "If you can waste this much money on postage maybe we should renegotiate the commission."  The entire office rolled their eyes at that.  My immediate boss -- who lived ten minutes away from the client -- then announced that he would collect every piece of correspondence every day and drop it off in person on his way home twice a week after that.

2.  Here is the kicker:  My then-boyfriend was an office supplies buyer for a banking chain.  His invitation to a vendor show included a free guest, so I went with him and picked up a huge shopping bag of new products that included vinyl-coated paper clips in assorted colors.  I brought this to the office and used them.  My boss told me one morning after dropping off an estimate to our client "Where did you get that red paper clip?  Harvey loved it."  I explained the source and he said.  "The other day his boss held a senior management meeting at which he announced that the company was no longer going to waste money on paper clips.  The meeting went on for an hour and a half in which he explained what documents were to be stapled instead of held together with paper clips.  Harvey wants to be able to identify his paper clips so he can get them back, so can we get him a box that are all one color, like blue?" 

I told him I'd ask our office manager, but also speculated on how this man could justify wasting 90 minutes of his highest-paid employees' time over an annual office expenditure that didn't equal the hourly wage of any of them.  My boss knew this didn't make any sense, but we didn't want to lose the account.

Our next CEO resigned the account three years later over a difference of opinion regarding how the client was handling a product's second year in the market.  That client is no longer in business.





ladyknight1

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #532 on: April 14, 2013, 01:07:32 PM »
I was half watching/half listening to HLN Murder Mysteries yesterday afternoon and caught something that made me think of this thread.  A woman was shown entering and leaving a store (similar to Lowes) on a certain date and time.  She bought some containers of some kind of acid and a few other things used in the crime.  The investigators explained that the video wasnít clear enough to prove it was her, but something else did:  she used her discount card to save 34 cents.  That helped to prove she bought the items.

Nothing wrong with using a discount card; most of us do it all the time.  But Iíll bet she wishes she hadnít bothered.  Now she's in prison.  ;)

I remember that one! She and the victim had matching luxury sedans and she was switching them out in the parking lot too.
ďAll that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

cabbageweevil

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #533 on: April 14, 2013, 02:23:37 PM »
I love that.

The stamp thing makes me remember a boss of a client of my first ad agency who nickel and dimed my company within an inch of his life.  That was back in the days before computers on every desk, the current quality of fax, e-mail, and the internet (sometime during the Roman Empire). ..

1.  He got really weird about postage.  My firm's senior partner received a memo from him one day that contained cancelled postage ripped off of that week's mail (He opened all the mail in the company no matter whom it was addressed to).  The mail that week was all from different departments in our office and addressed to different people in different departments within the client's company, which was much larger than ours.  The memo -- written on a carbon form -- said "If you can waste this much money on postage maybe we should renegotiate the commission."  The entire office rolled their eyes at that.  My immediate boss -- who lived ten minutes away from the client -- then announced that he would collect every piece of correspondence every day and drop it off in person on his way home twice a week after that.

People can indeed be amazingly stingy over postal matters. It occurs to me that if cheapskatery were a more widespread human trait, perhaps the use of postage stamps would never have caught on. After all, we managed without them for very many centuries before their introduction in the 1840s...

reflection5

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #534 on: April 14, 2013, 03:55:42 PM »
I was half watching/half listening to HLN Murder Mysteries yesterday afternoon and caught something that made me think of this thread.  A woman was shown entering and leaving a store (similar to Lowes) on a certain date and time.  She bought some containers of some kind of acid and a few other things used in the crime.  The investigators explained that the video wasn’t clear enough to prove it was her, but something else did:  she used her discount card to save 34 cents.  That helped to prove she bought the items.

Nothing wrong with using a discount card; most of us do it all the time.  But I’ll bet she wishes she hadn’t bothered.  Now she's in prison.  ;)

I remember that one! She and the victim had matching luxury sedans and she was switching them out in the parking lot too.

YES!  Must have been a rerun. 
« Last Edit: April 14, 2013, 03:57:15 PM by reflection5 »

Twik

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #535 on: April 15, 2013, 09:55:49 AM »
I was half watching/half listening to HLN Murder Mysteries yesterday afternoon and caught something that made me think of this thread.  A woman was shown entering and leaving a store (similar to Lowes) on a certain date and time.  She bought some containers of some kind of acid and a few other things used in the crime.  The investigators explained that the video wasnít clear enough to prove it was her, but something else did:  she used her discount card to save 34 cents.  That helped to prove she bought the items.

Nothing wrong with using a discount card; most of us do it all the time.  But Iíll bet she wishes she hadnít bothered.  Now she's in prison.  ;)

Honestly, if you put that in a work of fiction, people would assume it could only be satire, not a realistic portrayal.

"Hmmm, I could disappear leaving no evidence of this purchase, or save 34 cents. Decisions, decisions...."
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

siamesecat2965

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #536 on: April 15, 2013, 10:57:22 AM »
I was half watching/half listening to HLN Murder Mysteries yesterday afternoon and caught something that made me think of this thread.  A woman was shown entering and leaving a store (similar to Lowes) on a certain date and time.  She bought some containers of some kind of acid and a few other things used in the crime.  The investigators explained that the video wasnít clear enough to prove it was her, but something else did:  she used her discount card to save 34 cents.  That helped to prove she bought the items.

Nothing wrong with using a discount card; most of us do it all the time.  But Iíll bet she wishes she hadnít bothered.  Now she's in prison.  ;)

Honestly, if you put that in a work of fiction, people would assume it could only be satire, not a realistic portrayal.

"Hmmm, I could disappear leaving no evidence of this purchase, or save 34 cents. Decisions, decisions...."

I think this is why its said there is not such thing as the perfect crime as the perp always slips up somehow, many times, without even realizing it.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #537 on: April 15, 2013, 11:27:29 AM »
My mother and sisters used to joke about Granddaddy being cheap.  Other than him telling people to keep the door shut because "I'm not gonna heat up/air condition the great outdoors!" I don't recall hearing him or witnessing him being all that cheap but they grew up with him.

The joke was that when he died, they were going to bury him with his hands in his pockets instead of crossed over his chest so he could keep on pinching pennies.   I once found a letter Grandma sent my aunt when my father asked Granddaddy for my mother's hand, reporting what he said.

Apparently his answer was, "How bout I give you a dollar to elope?" I laughed good and long at that one. Granddaddy didn't get off that easily though, poor guy.  He spent just as much on his youngest daughter's wedding but she divorced (for good reason, imo) before a year was up.  I never heard him complain about the amount he spent though. 
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

dawbs

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #538 on: April 15, 2013, 11:38:51 AM »
I was half watching/half listening to HLN Murder Mysteries yesterday afternoon and caught something that made me think of this thread.  A woman was shown entering and leaving a store (similar to Lowes) on a certain date and time.  She bought some containers of some kind of acid and a few other things used in the crime.  The investigators explained that the video wasnít clear enough to prove it was her, but something else did:  she used her discount card to save 34 cents.  That helped to prove she bought the items.

Nothing wrong with using a discount card; most of us do it all the time.  But Iíll bet she wishes she hadnít bothered.  Now she's in prison.  ;)

Honestly, if you put that in a work of fiction, people would assume it could only be satire, not a realistic portrayal.

"Hmmm, I could disappear leaving no evidence of this purchase, or save 34 cents. Decisions, decisions...."

I think this is why its said there is not such thing as the perfect crime as the perp always slips up somehow, many times, without even realizing it.

Of course, if someone made the perfect frame and went un-caught, then the investigators just *think* there's no perfect crime, because they haven't caught the framer.   ;D

Luci

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #539 on: April 15, 2013, 12:58:28 PM »
 
Death involved:

I don't know if it was denial or cheapskate, but I personally feel it was a combination, then fanned two people in the next generation.

My father-in-law passed in 1993. He was cremated (a combination of cheapness and ecological concerns). His ashes were kept by the funeral home as no one did anything about an internment. At that point the major decision makers were the four children and widow. Two children wanted to do something, but the other three involved just got emotional and angry when it was mentioned.

My mother-in-law passed in 2004, as later did my dad. My brother and I had the funeral, cremation, and burial done in a timely manner. Daddy always said that everyone deserves a memorial, even the smallest piece of ground. I, of course, was torn with grief and getting angrier and angrier at everyone ignoring my in-laws' ashes just sitting in the funeral home.

I called my sister-in-law with Lucas's approval, then wrote letters to the other brothers and all of the grandchildren asking permission to get the job done. (Sister and Lucas were prepared to go the huge granite memorial together if needed.) All agreed, but the two brothers fought every decision we made. One suggested we buy a tree for the park dedicated to them ($50). We finally bought a plot in the memorial garden for $1200 and had them properly marked and interred. We handled the Christian burial service ourselves, everyone attended (all children grandchildren, spouses and great-grandchildren). Lucas and his sister paid for a dinner for all of us.

I do occasionally get some gratitude from the sister and grandchildren for finally getting the job done, but one brother still complains about the expense, even though all he paid was gasoline. (This is the same man mentioned in the far earlier post above.)