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Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 625346 times)

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dawbs

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #525 on: April 15, 2013, 11:38:51 AM »
I was half watching/half listening to HLN Murder Mysteries yesterday afternoon and caught something that made me think of this thread.  A woman was shown entering and leaving a store (similar to Lowes) on a certain date and time.  She bought some containers of some kind of acid and a few other things used in the crime.  The investigators explained that the video wasnít clear enough to prove it was her, but something else did:  she used her discount card to save 34 cents.  That helped to prove she bought the items.

Nothing wrong with using a discount card; most of us do it all the time.  But Iíll bet she wishes she hadnít bothered.  Now she's in prison.  ;)

Honestly, if you put that in a work of fiction, people would assume it could only be satire, not a realistic portrayal.

"Hmmm, I could disappear leaving no evidence of this purchase, or save 34 cents. Decisions, decisions...."

I think this is why its said there is not such thing as the perfect crime as the perp always slips up somehow, many times, without even realizing it.

Of course, if someone made the perfect frame and went un-caught, then the investigators just *think* there's no perfect crime, because they haven't caught the framer.   ;D

Luci

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #526 on: April 15, 2013, 12:58:28 PM »
 
Death involved:

I don't know if it was denial or cheapskate, but I personally feel it was a combination, then fanned two people in the next generation.

My father-in-law passed in 1993. He was cremated (a combination of cheapness and ecological concerns). His ashes were kept by the funeral home as no one did anything about an internment. At that point the major decision makers were the four children and widow. Two children wanted to do something, but the other three involved just got emotional and angry when it was mentioned.

My mother-in-law passed in 2004, as later did my dad. My brother and I had the funeral, cremation, and burial done in a timely manner. Daddy always said that everyone deserves a memorial, even the smallest piece of ground. I, of course, was torn with grief and getting angrier and angrier at everyone ignoring my in-laws' ashes just sitting in the funeral home.

I called my sister-in-law with Lucas's approval, then wrote letters to the other brothers and all of the grandchildren asking permission to get the job done. (Sister and Lucas were prepared to go the huge granite memorial together if needed.) All agreed, but the two brothers fought every decision we made. One suggested we buy a tree for the park dedicated to them ($50). We finally bought a plot in the memorial garden for $1200 and had them properly marked and interred. We handled the Christian burial service ourselves, everyone attended (all children grandchildren, spouses and great-grandchildren). Lucas and his sister paid for a dinner for all of us.

I do occasionally get some gratitude from the sister and grandchildren for finally getting the job done, but one brother still complains about the expense, even though all he paid was gasoline. (This is the same man mentioned in the far earlier post above.)

Calistoga

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #527 on: April 15, 2013, 01:11:06 PM »
The restaurant I work in is right across the street from a big medical plaza and smack dab in the middle of two car dealer ships. It's the closet restaurant for all of those employees, so we get a lot of repeat business. Sometimes someone will come in in the morning and get a soda, then come back later and get a refill, and we let them, because we remember them from earlier in the day.

But this one woman...she's such a cheap skate that she comes in on monday morning, gets a tea, then keeps the same glass all week and comes in every day with it to get a refill! For a while we would just change her glass out, but now she's been cut off- she only gets a refill if she comes in on the same day, just like everyone else. Boy was she mad! But keep in mind here, a glass of tea costs 1.08.

artk2002

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #528 on: April 15, 2013, 01:18:38 PM »
The restaurant I work in is right across the street from a big medical plaza and smack dab in the middle of two car dealer ships. It's the closet restaurant for all of those employees, so we get a lot of repeat business. Sometimes someone will come in in the morning and get a soda, then come back later and get a refill, and we let them, because we remember them from earlier in the day.

But this one woman...she's such a cheap skate that she comes in on monday morning, gets a tea, then keeps the same glass all week and comes in every day with it to get a refill! For a while we would just change her glass out, but now she's been cut off- she only gets a refill if she comes in on the same day, just like everyone else. Boy was she mad! But keep in mind here, a glass of tea costs 1.08.

My elder son and I took a road trip a couple of weeks ago and I noticed something in a McDonald's. Over the self-serve drinks machine there were two signs each saying the same thing, multiple times, just worded differently. The gist was that "free refill" was for someone who had bought a drink on that visit. Apparently, people were bringing in cups from previous days and refilling. And, counter to stereotypes, this was in a relatively well-to-do neighborhood; I've been in McDonald's in some pretty dicey places and have never seen that kind of sign.
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Hillia

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #529 on: April 15, 2013, 01:26:50 PM »
The restaurant I work in is right across the street from a big medical plaza and smack dab in the middle of two car dealer ships. It's the closet restaurant for all of those employees, so we get a lot of repeat business. Sometimes someone will come in in the morning and get a soda, then come back later and get a refill, and we let them, because we remember them from earlier in the day.

But this one woman...she's such a cheap skate that she comes in on monday morning, gets a tea, then keeps the same glass all week and comes in every day with it to get a refill! For a while we would just change her glass out, but now she's been cut off- she only gets a refill if she comes in on the same day, just like everyone else. Boy was she mad! But keep in mind here, a glass of tea costs 1.08.

My elder son and I took a road trip a couple of weeks ago and I noticed something in a McDonald's. Over the self-serve drinks machine there were two signs each saying the same thing, multiple times, just worded differently. The gist was that "free refill" was for someone who had bought a drink on that visit. Apparently, people were bringing in cups from previous days and refilling. And, counter to stereotypes, this was in a relatively well-to-do neighborhood; I've been in McDonald's in some pretty dicey places and have never seen that kind of sign.

I'm seeing this exact sign in almost every McDonald's I go in; this is across 4 states and various neighborhoods.  It must be getting to be such an issue that they're taking a stand franchise-wide, regardless of whether that particular store has a problem or not.

reflection5

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #530 on: April 15, 2013, 01:31:48 PM »
Saving a cup from a previous McD visit and bringing it back to get a free refill?   ::)

Reminds me of that guy on the "Extreme Cheapskates" show who (I think) took a cup from the trash and got his wife a free drink.

I almost never get a drink from McD or any fast food (I usually just get a sandwich to go).  I've never seen such a sign, but next time I'll look.

Coralreef

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #531 on: April 15, 2013, 01:59:56 PM »
Postage cheapskate : at my first job, I was a sales rep.  I went to visit one of our distributors with my boss (have to introduce the newbie).  The manager was not there, he was hand delivering the mail to his in-town customers, on his bike.  I usually took him most of the day.  My boss was  >:(  and I was  ??? .

I've removed stamps from envelopes, but only because they were either from another country or had a nice picture on them.  Mother only bought the ones with the Queen or the Canadian flag.  Getting one with a bird was a treasure-in-waiting.

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reflection5

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #532 on: April 15, 2013, 02:04:45 PM »
Quote
The manager was not there, he was hand delivering the mail to his in-town customers, on his bike.

He was overpaid.

weeblewobble

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #533 on: April 15, 2013, 08:56:27 PM »
My mother and sisters used to joke about Granddaddy being cheap.  Other than him telling people to keep the door shut because "I'm not gonna heat up/air condition the great outdoors!"


My grandma's expression was "You're lettin' out all the bought air!"

weeblewobble

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #534 on: April 15, 2013, 09:15:22 PM »
All of the talk of discount cards reminds me a story that isn't so much cheapskate-y, but "He did WHAT?!"  My favorite local sushi place offers a discount card for repeat customers.  In the beginning, it was really awesome, 10 percent off all purchases.  Then about six months ago, a little sign showed up on the tables stating that the discount card would no longer be applied to credit card purchases.  Cash purchases only.  I thought that was a little weird.  And then the next time I came in for carryout, I noticed that the cashier took my discount card to the back of the restaurant during my transaction.  That had never happened when I used it before.  And the next few times I ordered carryout, same thing, the minute I pulled out my discount card, the cashier got this vaguely annoyed look on her face and took my card to the back. 

So finally, I asked if there was some sort of problem with my card. (An issue with the coding or magnetic strip, etc.) The cashier assured me that no, there was no problem, but she had to clear the transaction through the manager. 

While she was in the back of the restaurant, another customer told me that six months before, the management had to drastically change the way they handled discount cards because a former employee had issued  himself several different discount cards.  He would do transactions for customers without the discount cards and then had figured out how to go back into the system after the customer left the store, apply the discount to the transaction and collect the difference.  (I wasn't really clear on that part.  I guess he took cash out of the drawer?)   It may not sound like much, but with several of these transactions a day, it added up quickly.

Finally, the management noticed that the same cards were being used several times each day, which seemed like a lot of sushi, even for an enthusiast.  They caught the guy and fired him.  And to keep employees from using the cards willy nilly, all discounted transactions had to be noted by the manager.

Thanks a lot, sushi bar thief guy.

*inviteseller

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #535 on: April 15, 2013, 09:30:29 PM »
My parents are on the upper end of comfortable thanks to my dads pensions, and his inheritance from my grandparents, but you would think they were standing in the dole line during the depression!  Some fine examples _  Growing up, the thermostat was set at igloo.  It also was in the hallway we all walked through to get to the bathroom and bedrooms so it might get bumped if you got some kids horsing around.  He honestly would check it 3-4 times a day and if it was moved (he used a marker to mark the exact spot) he would raise the roof that we were gonna live on the streets because the gas bill was putting him in the poor house.  At a picnic for my DD's birthday at a park, after everyone was done eating they were throwing away their plates, cups and silverware.  My Step mom was standing there taking peoples plastic silver ware and putting them in a separate bag.  She then handed me the bag so I could take them home to wash and reuse.  When she wasn't looking, I threw the bag away.  Tin foil is the devil's product!  It is too expensive so they use cheap plastic wrap that is impossible to use because it sticks to everything but the bowl you are trying to wrap.  At my house, I hear how I waste money on it.  Toilet paper useage-nuff said.  I could go on for days...

MommyPenguin

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #536 on: April 15, 2013, 09:31:54 PM »
Speaking of loyalty cards, my local grocery store (Meijer) is one of the few grocery stores I've used that doesn't have a loyalty card.  They do have some sort of program where you can clip coupons, but it's cell-phone-based so I can't use it.  But I like that I don't have to keep track of a loyalty card when I shop, they don't track my purchases, and the prices are the same.  I was somewhat amused to see a sign they had at the store last night, though, which said something like, "You don't have to prove your loyalty to us... it's our job to be loyal to you!"  I was rather charmed, I have to admit.
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Slartibartfast

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #537 on: April 15, 2013, 09:42:30 PM »
Speaking of loyalty cards, my local grocery store (Meijer) is one of the few grocery stores I've used that doesn't have a loyalty card.  They do have some sort of program where you can clip coupons, but it's cell-phone-based so I can't use it.  But I like that I don't have to keep track of a loyalty card when I shop, they don't track my purchases, and the prices are the same.  I was somewhat amused to see a sign they had at the store last night, though, which said something like, "You don't have to prove your loyalty to us... it's our job to be loyal to you!"  I was rather charmed, I have to admit.

They probably still track your purchases if you use a credit or debit card, but I'm with you on the loyalty card thing.  I no longer shop at Kroger because I hate having to count out "Did I get nine of the sale items, or ten?  What if I need eleven - should I put one back?"  (They frequently have "Buy 10 get $5 off" or "10 for $10" deals, but you have to get exactly ten for the deal.  If you buy nine, no dice.  If you buy nineteen, only the first ten qualify.)  Publix is another store that doesn't require a loyalty card - and their "buy one get one free" sales are actually "everything on sale is half price," which is nice when I don't really need two  :)

reflection5

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #538 on: April 15, 2013, 09:49:27 PM »
Quote
(They frequently have "Buy 10 get $5 off" or "10 for $10" deals, but you have to get exactly ten for the deal.  If you buy nine, no dice.  If you buy nineteen, only the first ten qualify.) 
At Kroger here if they have 10 for $10, you can get 1 for $1 and so on.  I've gone to their website to download e-coupons a few times, and it works but takes a lot of time to go thru everything.  I also get good coupons from them in the mail (Haagen Dazs - free, :) $1.50 off Starbucks and Gevalie coffee, $2 off Gain detergent).
« Last Edit: April 16, 2013, 08:22:31 AM by reflection5 »

Luci

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #539 on: April 15, 2013, 11:10:17 PM »
Lucas is not usually a cheapskate, but he does insist on generic/house brand where I will try it once and then decide.

I needed a medication that is now over the counter, so I was ready to buy the name brand that I have used twice before. Lucas happened to be with me and convinced me to get the store brand. Well, I suffered for another 5 days, went back for the trusted brand and was comfortable in 12 hours and cured in 72 as promised. So he paid double and made me suffer for almost an extra week because we were being cheap.

On my part: when we were painting to sell, I found a suitable color of paint for the bathroom at a super discount store. Bought it. He  never struggled so hard to get that stuff spread and sticking than any other decorating job, ever! Thank goodness it was just the upper half of a small room. Now when we paint, we always use Baer or Clark and Kensington or Sherwin-Williams and the best rollers. Life is really smooth in that area, now! I converted us to good brushes about 4 projects ago, at least.

We have bought good flooring lately, professionally installed. Now I think he will go along with good drapes - that fit!