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Cheapskate stories

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Shalamar:
I once read that the difference between cheapness and thrift is:  does your behaviour cause physical discomfort for yourself or others?    If so, you're cheap.   In that case, my mum is cheap.   One winter the cost of heating her house went up by a few dollars per month, so - despite the fact that she and Dad could easily afford it - she set the thermostat to 16 Celsius.   I was freezing during my visit and begged her to turn it up; she refused.  "Just put on another sweater!"   "I'M ALREADY WEARING TWO!"

RingTailedLemur:

--- Quote from: Shalamar on March 31, 2013, 12:41:26 PM ---I once read that the difference between cheapness and thrift is:  does your behaviour cause physical discomfort for yourself or others?    If so, you're cheap.   In that case, my mum is cheap.   One winter the cost of heating her house went up by a few dollars per month, so - despite the fact that she and Dad could easily afford it - she set the thermostat to 16 Celsius.   I was freezing during my visit and begged her to turn it up; she refused.  "Just put on another sweater!"   "I'M ALREADY WEARING TWO!"

--- End quote ---

Our house was like that, growing up - we didn't have any heating at all.  In the mornings you could tell when someone had sprayed their deodorant on in the freezing cold bathroom - you'd hear a shriek!

reflection5:

--- Quote ---16 Celsius
--- End quote ---

About 60 degrees F.  In winter, too cold for me, too.

Library Dragon:
We refused to dine out with IL's friends. None of these people were hurting financially. One set insisted on buffets and brought plastic bags and would load up.  Others would have a melt down if you ordered anything not on the lunch or early bird list. 

One BIL was treating everyone to lunch and he was told by the friends that he couldn't order the artichokes because it wasn't on the lunch specials menu.  He politely explained that since he was paying he could order what he wanted.  You would have thought he wanted to steal the food off their plates!  We were taking care of the tip and had to take it out of one pair of hands because he thought it was too much.  We had to hand it directly to the waitress that had been run ragged during the lunch.

reflection5:
One of my uncles had a neighbor who repeatedly had utility shut-offs.  The guy wasn’t poor or struggling; he just choose to spend money on other things.  He had 2 souped-up motorcycles, a truck, sat in his yard drinking beer, had 2 big dogs, and talked a lot about playing the lottery.

His water got shut off.  So he came over and asked uncle if he could get buckets of water from uncle’s outside faucet (“just for a couple weeks”) and then he would pay uncle for the courtesy.  Uncle was the type who found it difficult to say “No”.  But it went on for a couple months, and at my aunt’s insistence Uncle told him he could no longer get water.  The guy gave Uncle $2.00, and tried to shame Uncle about “not helping a neighbor”.   ::)


--- Quote ---One set insisted on buffets and brought plastic bags and would load up.
--- End quote ---

I saw a couple do that at a buffet, and the manager apparently confronted them and explained that the food at the "all you can eat" buffet was to be eaten on site.  (vs "all you can bag up and take home")

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