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Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 543010 times)

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wheeitsme

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #615 on: April 17, 2013, 03:56:12 PM »
...    I will stick them in my pantry and then curse them whenever I can't put something else away, so in the garbage they will
go.   ...




I'd dump the contents and save the jars!   ;D

Some of the jars are reused commercial jars, like salsa jars. I don't think those can be/should be reused.

Oh, I don't know.  I inherited a lot of ancient home-canned goods, many of them in whatever jar happened to fit a canning lid.  I buried the contents in the vegetable garden, and the jars are being reused -- after being smashed, melted and formed into new jars.   That counts as reusing, doesn't it?  ;)

Actually the old jars (including old commercial jars) can be re-used.  They need to be cleaned and sterilized (like in a dishwasher), but they can be re-used.  The lids should not.  Every time you can something you should use a new lid. If the new canning lids fit the old commercial jars, that could be very acceptable. 

I don't bother with the old commercial jars because it's too much trouble.  I do, however, check to see if they have any old canning jars in any thrift store I go into (but those usually get snatched up really quick).

Arrynne

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #616 on: April 17, 2013, 05:08:31 PM »
Amasi, I assume it was a chest freezer?  I've seen people on my local Freecycle asking for non-working freezers to store grain in (presumably for in a barn) because it helps keep vermin out.  If you're within driving distance of a rural area, you may be able to find someone who will come pick it up!

It's a very large upright freezer. I've already tried putting it on my local free stuff page. I've also tried emailing the local scrap metal place to see if they'd pick it up, but got no reply. It may be time to try again  :)

Check for an appliance recycler.  Last time we bought a fridge, a third party company came out to pick up the old one and recycle it.  It cost us $30, but got rid of the boat anchor.

Wulfie

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #617 on: April 17, 2013, 05:10:31 PM »
Or look online for a scrap metal hauler. We had one come take away our dead fridge for free. He also took a bunch of other metal stuff that had been building up in the shed.

Elfmama

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #618 on: April 17, 2013, 05:33:32 PM »
Made no sense except that the value lay not in the food consumed, but in the  money saved.  He couldn't get that it's not really a savings if you don't want what you're eating!
Or if you don't need what is on sale.  If you don't need a widget that normally costs $1000, but you buy it because it's 70% off, you haven't saved $700 -- you've spent $300 for a totally useless widget!  Couldn't get that through to my brother in any way, shape, form, or manner.  He and his wife would spend all their money on junk and then go whining to my parents that they couldn't pay their rent/car payment/electric bill.

Never figured it out. We were raised in the same house by the same parents, but I learned to budget my money, pay the bills and put some in savings FIRST, then buy the fun stuff with what was left over.  Brother never did.
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Luci

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #619 on: April 17, 2013, 06:01:16 PM »
I honestly think that if it weren't for recycling that I would be a hoarder about some things.

When recycling came to town, I had over 50 margarine and Cool Whip containers and about 25 gallon milk jugs and uncountable glass jars - peanut butter, Miracle Whip, dressing (those all came in glass in my early marriage.) Now I am the queen of recycling and even treated myself to food storage containers that stack and fit nicely into a  small space.  I'm very choosey about plastic bags to reuse, to.

I still have fabric scraps from the first suit I sewed (1961) and some other pieces that will never be used, but I'm working on it. I even donated my yarn stash to Good Will when I realized that my hands don't work for crochet and knitting anymore, but I was very neat about it and labeled by fiber type. I keep hoping that I read on here that 'Wow! I got the coolest bunch of yarn! Several skeins that matched and a lot of scraps in neat balls for my plastic mesh projects!'
 

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #620 on: April 17, 2013, 06:08:54 PM »
I have to keep my middle child from turning into a hoarder.  He's an aspiring engineer and wants to hold onto just about every single piece of scrap metal or plastic he can find, or wire or tape.

It doesn't matter if toys are broken, he will insist "But I can use it to build something else!"  Now, to give him credit, he is very creative and at 10 years old, he's very good and understands the basics of circuits.  Today, with batteries and some spare bits of wire, he gave a Lego car a homemade motorized propeller.   

Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

GreenEyedHawk

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #621 on: April 17, 2013, 06:24:13 PM »
Pirateluvr your son reminds me of my cousins and me when we were that age...we were all creators and builders (as adults now, among us there are a machinist, an engineer and a mechanic) and when we were about the same age as your son when we built a little boat (that floated!) and took apart a Walkman and used its cassette motor to give it a propeller.  It buzzed out into the middle of our town's man-made lake, where we'd repeatedly swim out to rescue it.
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Bluenomi

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #622 on: April 17, 2013, 06:54:08 PM »
Made no sense except that the value lay not in the food consumed, but in the  money saved.  He couldn't get that it's not really a savings if you don't want what you're eating!
Or if you don't need what is on sale.  If you don't need a widget that normally costs $1000, but you buy it because it's 70% off, you haven't saved $700 -- you've spent $300 for a totally useless widget!  Couldn't get that through to my brother in any way, shape, form, or manner.  He and his wife would spend all their money on junk and then go whining to my parents that they couldn't pay their rent/car payment/electric bill.

Never figured it out. We were raised in the same house by the same parents, but I learned to budget my money, pay the bills and put some in savings FIRST, then buy the fun stuff with what was left over.  Brother never did.

DH and BIL are like that. DH is great at budgeting, saving etc but BIL just spends and spends (mostly on new cars). It took me a while but I worked it out, DH is like MIL but BIL is like FIL. He is the same, MIL is always complaining about him wanting to buy new cars and waste money. So glad I got the sensible brother!

reflection5

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #623 on: April 17, 2013, 07:34:46 PM »
   The sad part is that hoarding, from what I've read, is one of the most difficult compulsions to treat because it is almost impossible to convince the hoarder that what they're doing is not normal.

 

Yup. I was watching over the weekend, and told a friend there is no way I could ever help someone who hoards clean out their home. I am ruthless, and am of the mind, if its not needed, don't have space for it, its trash, or you have more than you could ever possibly use" it goes. I simply don't have the patience since as you said, they don't know that their behavior isn't normal.

Yeah, my dad comes from a family of hoarders. He and his brothers all married women who are either anti-hoarders or good at organizing, which is probably the only thing that saved them. Sometimes the symptoms of being a hoarder and being a cheapskate are the same--collecting plasticware, napkins, and condiment packages from restaurants, for example. In my mind, the hoarder never ends up using all the napkins they've collected, while the cheapskate uses them them for everything, even stuff that's kind of dicey, like baby diapers and toilet paper and gift wrap. I think the cheapskate actually has to save money, on the surface anyway, from not buying diapers and toilet paper and gift wrap in order to feel good; while the hoarder feels good because they've got this huge pile of napkins, which probably gets dirty and unusable before they can ever be used. That's my take on it, anyway.

I  agree (w/bolded).  Cheapskate must save money/get something free and will use the items.  OTOH, hoarder feels better just having things and stockpiling them, even though they often won't use them or even allow others to use them. (footnote: I hope we haven't derailed the thread with analysis of hoarding.  Don't want to get thread locked.)  :-\

misha412

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #624 on: April 17, 2013, 09:01:39 PM »
This isn't really my cheapskate story, since it happened before I met DH, but FIL has (and apparently has always had) a strong cheapskate streak.  MIL has a strong passive-aggressive streak, which makes for some interesting dynamics sometimes.  Apparently once upon a time when DH was young, FIL went to Costo or Sam's Club or one of those big "bargain" stores and discovered you can buy split pea soup by the crate - 48 times the regular package size.  Incidentally, he's the only one in the family who likes split pea soup. MIL proceeded to serve him split pea soup every breakfast, lunch, and dinner for two weeks.  (FIL later canceled his Costco membership.)

I am laughing so hard I just about snorted Coke out my nose.  ;D

He loved split pea soup...so what was the problem?  >:D

jedikaiti

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #625 on: April 17, 2013, 09:08:59 PM »
This isn't really my cheapskate story, since it happened before I met DH, but FIL has (and apparently has always had) a strong cheapskate streak.  MIL has a strong passive-aggressive streak, which makes for some interesting dynamics sometimes.  Apparently once upon a time when DH was young, FIL went to Costo or Sam's Club or one of those big "bargain" stores and discovered you can buy split pea soup by the crate - 48 times the regular package size.  Incidentally, he's the only one in the family who likes split pea soup. MIL proceeded to serve him split pea soup every breakfast, lunch, and dinner for two weeks.  (FIL later canceled his Costco membership.)

I am laughing so hard I just about snorted Coke out my nose.  ;D

He loved split pea soup...so what was the problem?  >:D

Did he still love split pea soup after week 3?
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artk2002

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #626 on: April 17, 2013, 09:19:26 PM »
I have to keep my middle child from turning into a hoarder.  He's an aspiring engineer and wants to hold onto just about every single piece of scrap metal or plastic he can find, or wire or tape.

It doesn't matter if toys are broken, he will insist "But I can use it to build something else!"  Now, to give him credit, he is very creative and at 10 years old, he's very good and understands the basics of circuits.  Today, with batteries and some spare bits of wire, he gave a Lego car a homemade motorized propeller.

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Piratelvr1121

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #627 on: April 17, 2013, 09:37:59 PM »
Here's a picture of the motor, and it works.  He even took it to school to show off.   He said his teacher has dubbed him Thomas Edison and every progress report comes home with a note from Mr. S. praising Pirateboy2 for his intelligence and aptitude for engineering.   

They have a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) program in our county and each week I think the kids have some kind of STEM activity which Pirateboy2 absolutely adores.



Really, when he does stuff like this, it's hard to convince him to throw away anything, but I do have my limits.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Moralia

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #628 on: April 17, 2013, 09:55:55 PM »
Aw!  You should get him a little small parts cabinet for his bits and bobs.  Then if he wants to save things for projects, there's a designated and limited size spot.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Akro-Mils-16-Drawer-Small-Parts-Storage-Cabinet-10116/203538802#.UW9fB4y9KSM

Of course, he'll probably need this, too...
http://www.makershed.com/Encyclopedia_of_Electronic_Components_Vol_1_p/mkbk17.htm


I don't know if this is thrifty or cheapskatey, but I pick up good stuff from the curb or dumpsters and stash it in my garage for the express purpose of donating on my next thrift shop run.  I usually get about $1000 in tax deductions for doing so.

There was one day when I took in 2 metal ironing boards, only to find a vintage wooden board at the thrift shop for $3.  So I bought it and then took in my metal ironing board later that afternoon. The thrift shop ladies had a very good laugh about that!

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #629 on: April 17, 2013, 10:12:02 PM »
Aw!  You should get him a little small parts cabinet for his bits and bobs.  Then if he wants to save things for projects, there's a designated and limited size spot.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Akro-Mils-16-Drawer-Small-Parts-Storage-Cabinet-10116/203538802#.UW9fB4y9KSM

Of course, he'll probably need this, too...
http://www.makershed.com/Encyclopedia_of_Electronic_Components_Vol_1_p/mkbk17.htm


I don't know if this is thrifty or cheapskatey, but I pick up good stuff from the curb or dumpsters and stash it in my garage for the express purpose of donating on my next thrift shop run.  I usually get about $1000 in tax deductions for doing so.

There was one day when I took in 2 metal ironing boards, only to find a vintage wooden board at the thrift shop for $3.  So I bought it and then took in my metal ironing board later that afternoon. The thrift shop ladies had a very good laugh about that!

Oooh I need to bookmark those pages, as those would make for great birthday presents for him! 
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata