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Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 625363 times)

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SheltieMom

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #885 on: August 04, 2013, 05:53:35 PM »
The stories about people being cheap because they think the prices are too high reminds me of me. I wear lots of T-shirts because they're cheap, cheaper than nice shirts. I have money in the monthly budget that's supposed to go toward my clothes but I never spend it. When I do go clothes shopping I usually come home with nothing. $10 for a plain T-shirt? $40 for jeans? No thanks. I saw a pair of shorts online for $50 the other day, and I can't even fathom shopping at a place like Anthropologie, where a shirt can be close to $100.

 

I don't consider this to be cheap, but frugal. You aren't inconveniencing anyone or making anyone go without, or impacting anyone else because certain items cost more than you choose to pay for them. And unless you constantly badmouth people who are willing to pay that much for things, then you're fine.

Iím cheap about certain things as well; while I work in a store where a t-shirt can be $30 or more, pants over $100, and so on.  I get a nice discount, even on the sale stuff. And when I didnít work there, I waited for sales as well. Certain things, yes, I will pay more for since Iím a firm believer in ďyou get what you pay forĒ regarding some things.  But others, nope, I go as cheap as I can.

My friend's DH however, I posted about him upthread. he wont get a haircut unless he has a coupon, and its only $10 to begin with. She also told me he wears his undies until they are literally falling apart, in spite of the fact he buys the cheapest he can.

I'm the same way.  I refuse to pay $$$$ for clothes.  I am a regular at thrift and consignment shops and have shopped on e-bay because I can get great stuff for a fraction of the cost and the thrill of the hunt is fun for me too.  I am also too cheap to pay full price for clothes for my daughters who are young and will grow out of them in a few months (although I do splurge on shoes because they can be hard to fit).  Soon after DD1 was born, I realized yard sales were a great place for kids toys and will buy nearly all of them there.

I'm very much a bargain shopper for clothes, for myself, and my foster babies. (Although I've got way too much baby stuff-just ask DH!) My favorite place to shop for kids' stuff is Just Between Friends consignment sales. You might look and see if there's one in your area.
http://www.jbfsale.com/home.jsp
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nuit93

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #886 on: August 04, 2013, 06:34:54 PM »
The stories about people being cheap because they think the prices are too high reminds me of me. I wear lots of T-shirts because they're cheap, cheaper than nice shirts. I have money in the monthly budget that's supposed to go toward my clothes but I never spend it. When I do go clothes shopping I usually come home with nothing. $10 for a plain T-shirt? $40 for jeans? No thanks. I saw a pair of shorts online for $50 the other day, and I can't even fathom shopping at a place like Anthropologie, where a shirt can be close to $100.

 

I don't consider this to be cheap, but frugal. You aren't inconveniencing anyone or making anyone go without, or impacting anyone else because certain items cost more than you choose to pay for them. And unless you constantly badmouth people who are willing to pay that much for things, then you're fine.

Iím cheap about certain things as well; while I work in a store where a t-shirt can be $30 or more, pants over $100, and so on.  I get a nice discount, even on the sale stuff. And when I didnít work there, I waited for sales as well. Certain things, yes, I will pay more for since Iím a firm believer in ďyou get what you pay forĒ regarding some things.  But others, nope, I go as cheap as I can.

My friend's DH however, I posted about him upthread. he wont get a haircut unless he has a coupon, and its only $10 to begin with. She also told me he wears his undies until they are literally falling apart, in spite of the fact he buys the cheapest he can.

I'm the same way.  I refuse to pay $$$$ for clothes.  I am a regular at thrift and consignment shops and have shopped on e-bay because I can get great stuff for a fraction of the cost and the thrill of the hunt is fun for me too.  I am also too cheap to pay full price for clothes for my daughters who are young and will grow out of them in a few months (although I do splurge on shoes because they can be hard to fit).  Soon after DD1 was born, I realized yard sales were a great place for kids toys and will buy nearly all of them there.

I don't mind paying full price/bigger bucks for union-made or locally-made/fair trade clothing.  I won't pay big bucks for something I know was made in the same factory or sweatshop as the cheaper labels.  Besides, I can get a lot of stuff wholesale through work :)

snowflake

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #887 on: August 04, 2013, 06:49:46 PM »
There was once upon a time that I made a little more than $2000/mo in an expensive city.  I didn't require assistance but it ws tight.  My dad always used to rag on me.  "What can you possibly spend thosands of dollars a month on?"  You should save half of it.  My take home pay was 1600, my rent was 600.  (OK this was 15 years ago.)  He responded by telling me I only needed a couple hundred for food, utilities, and stuff like that.  Ironically, he was running up lots of cc debt at the time when he and my mom had over 6 figures in income.  I pointed this out and he told me that I didn't have a mortgage.  His mortgage was 5% of their income.

Yep, the "one way" cheapskatism.

Elfmama

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #888 on: August 04, 2013, 08:04:50 PM »
The stories about people being cheap because they think the prices are too high reminds me of me. I wear lots of T-shirts because they're cheap, cheaper than nice shirts. I have money in the monthly budget that's supposed to go toward my clothes but I never spend it. When I do go clothes shopping I usually come home with nothing. $10 for a plain T-shirt? $40 for jeans? No thanks. I saw a pair of shorts online for $50 the other day, and I can't even fathom shopping at a place like Anthropologie, where a shirt can be close to $100.

 

I don't consider this to be cheap, but frugal. You aren't inconveniencing anyone or making anyone go without, or impacting anyone else because certain items cost more than you choose to pay for them. And unless you constantly badmouth people who are willing to pay that much for things, then you're fine.

Iím cheap about certain things as well; while I work in a store where a t-shirt can be $30 or more, pants over $100, and so on.  I get a nice discount, even on the sale stuff. And when I didnít work there, I waited for sales as well. Certain things, yes, I will pay more for since Iím a firm believer in ďyou get what you pay forĒ regarding some things.  But others, nope, I go as cheap as I can.

My friend's DH however, I posted about him upthread. he wont get a haircut unless he has a coupon, and its only $10 to begin with. She also told me he wears his undies until they are literally falling apart, in spite of the fact he buys the cheapest he can.

I'm the same way.  I refuse to pay $$$$ for clothes.  I am a regular at thrift and consignment shops and have shopped on e-bay because I can get great stuff for a fraction of the cost and the thrill of the hunt is fun for me too.  I am also too cheap to pay full price for clothes for my daughters who are young and will grow out of them in a few months (although I do splurge on shoes because they can be hard to fit).  Soon after DD1 was born, I realized yard sales were a great place for kids toys and will buy nearly all of them there.

I don't mind paying full price/bigger bucks for union-made or locally-made/fair trade clothing.  I won't pay big bucks for something I know was made in the same factory or sweatshop as the cheaper labels.  Besides, I can get a lot of stuff wholesale through work :)
When DD1 went into high school, she wanted the same kind of designer jeans that some of the other kids had.  Jeans that cost $60, when my budget for new school clothes for two kids was $150.   She nagged and whined and was just generally so obnoxious that I finally snapped.  I went to the credit union and pulled out $150 in cash, handed her $75, and told her that this was all we could afford.  She could spend it however she wished.  Get the jeans, and no other new clothes, if that was what she wanted.

And you know what?  She looked at that money, more than she'd ever held in her hands before, and the state of her wardrobe, and stopped nagging about those jeans.  :o   She asked to be taken to the three different thrift shops in the area, and got several new-to-her skirts, blouses, and sweaters.  And yes, even designer jeans.  ;)
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CrazyDaffodilLady

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #889 on: August 04, 2013, 10:45:26 PM »
I took five nieces and nephews on a 2-day trip to a theme park.  I knew from experience that I'd be hounded with unending requests for snacks and souvenirs, so I gave each of the kids $20 per day and told them that I'd pay for regular meals, but they were expected to pay for optional items with the money.  Not one of them spent a dime of it.  They even chose to drink from water fountains rather than buy soft drinks.  They became major cheapskates when their own money was at stake.

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jedikaiti

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #890 on: August 05, 2013, 12:42:18 AM »
LOL... I was the opposite, I was a total cheapskate when I was spending someone else's money (albeit on a budget).

When I was a kid, one of the department stores had a special section set up for kids to do Christmas shopping. The parents could provide a list of who they had to buy for, and a total budget and payment method. A store clerk would take each child into the section, help them shop, and if there was a credit card for payment, run the receipt out for the parents signature.

I was given a budget of $50. I spent $26.

Of course, I was also the child who refused to spend any dollar denomination higher than $2. $2 and $1 and change I would spend. Anything higer was sacrosanct and stayed in the piggy bank until it went to the bank. No idea where I got that from.
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kherbert05

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #891 on: August 05, 2013, 04:42:56 AM »
I took five nieces and nephews on a 2-day trip to a theme park.  I knew from experience that I'd be hounded with unending requests for snacks and souvenirs, so I gave each of the kids $20 per day and told them that I'd pay for regular meals, but they were expected to pay for optional items with the money.  Not one of them spent a dime of it.  They even chose to drink from water fountains rather than buy soft drinks.  They became major cheapskates when their own money was at stake.
I do the same with my nieces and nephew. ON met me when she was 7 or so (Sister's stepdaughter) to be blunt she was used to Mom's family and Dad's family trying to out bid each other for her affection. After our first outing had a bunch of "get me this" followed by amazement at the word no (no tantrum just wow you said that and meant it.), I sat down with her and explained I was a poor teacher. I started giving her a budget. I paid admission, lunch, and in some cases bottled water (If the fountains were yuck). Then she had $10 - $20 spending money.

I more than once I've had the kids go look at the gift shop and come back and announce everything was overpriced. Then an adult standing nearby, dealing with "But I want it" whines pick their jaws up and ask how do you do that. Now I will often treat them to books (from a book store or amazon not the gift shop) or the panning for gold/crack open a geo things because it is about the experience not a piece of plastic junk that is going to beak before we get on 610.
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

kherbert05

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #892 on: August 05, 2013, 04:54:01 AM »
LOL... I was the opposite, I was a total cheapskate when I was spending someone else's money (albeit on a budget).

When I was a kid, one of the department stores had a special section set up for kids to do Christmas shopping. The parents could provide a list of who they had to buy for, and a total budget and payment method. A store clerk would take each child into the section, help them shop, and if there was a credit card for payment, run the receipt out for the parents signature.

I was given a budget of $50. I spent $26.

Of course, I was also the child who refused to spend any dollar denomination higher than $2. $2 and $1 and change I would spend. Anything higer was sacrosanct and stayed in the piggy bank until it went to the bank. No idea where I got that from.
I remember when Palais Royal used to open only for kids one Saturday between Thanksgiving and Christmas. It gave Sis and I good experience choosing presents for people. One year I bought some earrings for Cousin C and had them wrapped at the store. When she opened up the package it was empty. I think she really thought I did it on purpose (we butted heads regularly). Mom and Aunt explained to her the store had wrapped the package and must have lost the earrings. I was really upset because they were "perfect earrings" for Cousin. Mom took us to Palais Royal that week. When she explained to customer service what had happened the Manager came out - escorted us around the store. I found the same type of earrings. Not only did we get those - he insisted that all three of us (Cousin C, Sis, and me) pick out another set of earrings each because Christmas surprise was ruined.
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #893 on: August 05, 2013, 06:47:38 AM »
I took five nieces and nephews on a 2-day trip to a theme park.  I knew from experience that I'd be hounded with unending requests for snacks and souvenirs, so I gave each of the kids $20 per day and told them that I'd pay for regular meals, but they were expected to pay for optional items with the money.  Not one of them spent a dime of it.  They even chose to drink from water fountains rather than buy soft drinks.  They became major cheapskates when their own money was at stake.
I do the same with my nieces and nephew. ON met me when she was 7 or so (Sister's stepdaughter) to be blunt she was used to Mom's family and Dad's family trying to out bid each other for her affection. After our first outing had a bunch of "get me this" followed by amazement at the word no (no tantrum just wow you said that and meant it.), I sat down with her and explained I was a poor teacher. I started giving her a budget. I paid admission, lunch, and in some cases bottled water (If the fountains were yuck). Then she had $10 - $20 spending money.

I more than once I've had the kids go look at the gift shop and come back and announce everything was overpriced. Then an adult standing nearby, dealing with "But I want it" whines pick their jaws up and ask how do you do that. Now I will often treat them to books (from a book store or amazon not the gift shop) or the panning for gold/crack open a geo things because it is about the experience not a piece of plastic junk that is going to beak before we get on 610.

When we went to Assateague/Ocean City, my MIL gave each of the older 2 $20 to buy their own souvenirs.  I wish I could say that stopped the middle pirate from buying junk, but it didn't.  However my oldest did listen to the advice of his "auntie" (bff) who works in retail and gave them both some tips on buying souvenirs.  As in, don't waste money on overpriced junk you could easily find someplace else back home.  Well the oldest bought a dolphin shaped keychain that said Ocean City, MD and had sand in it, a travel coffee mug that also said Ocean City on it, and something else that escapes me at the moment.   The younger child bought a toy plastic boat, a plastic fan, and a kite.  The kite I believe actually lasted and was a practical purchase for the beach, but the boat and the fan both broke.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

siamesecat2965

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #894 on: August 05, 2013, 09:11:12 AM »
When we went to Assateague/Ocean City, my MIL gave each of the older 2 $20 to buy their own souvenirs.  I wish I could say that stopped the middle pirate from buying junk, but it didn't.  However my oldest did listen to the advice of his "auntie" (bff) who works in retail and gave them both some tips on buying souvenirs.  As in, don't waste money on overpriced junk you could easily find someplace else back home.   

My rule of thumb is I don't buy anything I could buy at home, or anything I won't use. I try and find stuff that's local to whereever I am, and if not, oh well. I have enough coffee cuts, etc. to last me a lifetime. I will sometimes buy a magnet for my fridge or t-shirt, but that's about it.


Thipu1

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #895 on: August 05, 2013, 09:24:20 AM »
We're pretty cheap wihen it comes to souvenirs. 

A fridge magnet is a must and, if available, a little box or basket made in the area.  We don't bother with anything else unless it's a real grabber.  I did splurge on a sweater in Iceland but that was a very rare case.

We don't bring tribute to anyone any more but, when in Baltimore we do load up on crab-themed stuff because we have a relative who collects things like that and has never been to Baltimore. 

siamesecat2965

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #896 on: August 05, 2013, 09:45:52 AM »
We're pretty cheap wihen it comes to souvenirs. 

A fridge magnet is a must and, if available, a little box or basket made in the area.  We don't bother with anything else unless it's a real grabber.  I did splurge on a sweater in Iceland but that was a very rare case.

We don't bring tribute to anyone any more but, when in Baltimore we do load up on crab-themed stuff because we have a relative who collects things like that and has never been to Baltimore.

I don't either. Although last time I was in Bermuda, i did bring my parents a bottle of rum, and my dad a Bermudian cookbook.  I do have to laugh; my sr. yr. in HS, 1984, I went to spain. And bought my parents souveniers. Some nice handpainted flowerpots and ashtrays. they both smoked at the time, but now my mom uses those for under plant saucers.  ANd I also bought them some lovely cloth napkins with a lacy design, which my mom still has and uses.

exitzero

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #897 on: August 05, 2013, 10:01:29 AM »
We're pretty cheap wihen it comes to souvenirs. 

A fridge magnet is a must and, if available, a little box or basket made in the area.  We don't bother with anything else unless it's a real grabber.  I did splurge on a sweater in Iceland but that was a very rare case.

We don't bring tribute to anyone any more but, when in Baltimore we do load up on crab-themed stuff because we have a relative who collects things like that and has never been to Baltimore.

My go-to souvenir is a pressed penny. It's cheap, easy to carry and don't take up much room once you get them home. I have some books that display them on my mantle.

Wulfie

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #898 on: August 05, 2013, 10:16:49 AM »

My go-to souvenir is a pressed penny. It's cheap, easy to carry and don't take up much room once you get them home. I have some books that display them on my mantle.

Same here. We have fun with them, there is a website http://www.pennycollector.com/ that has locators for them if you want to know where to go when you are on vacation/road tripping / collecting. Also, an M&M mini tube is just the right size for quarters and pennys. We stack them in the tube 2 quarters then a penny so that we always have the right coins for it.

Venus193

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #899 on: August 05, 2013, 10:22:31 AM »
I haven't traveled in ages but when I went to Spain I got posters for my colleagues that had their names ("translated" into Spanish) blocked in by the vendor.  They cost something like 300 pesetas in the park in Madrid (1993) to have your name blocked into a flamenco or bullfight poster.  I rolled them up together to pack into my suitcase.  Folding fans with (dancers, matadors, bulls, musicians on them) for most of the women cost 200 pesetas each; bought a lot of those.  Picked up lots of flamenco stuff for my class.

I refuse to buy kitschy stuff and I look for the best price for anything.  It's my nature.