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Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 528409 times)

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Katana_Geldar

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #945 on: August 06, 2013, 04:29:12 AM »
I once saw a "money-saving tip" of buying ahoes at Payless.  Gee, that's nice but I need soles that won't destroy my aging feet.  The crazy thing was that this was supposed to save me 200 a month.  Yes, I checked it - A MONTH!!!!!  I might buy expensive shoes, but I spend closer to 200 per year.  AND each pair lasts me 3-5 years.

I'm 30 next year and I still have a pair of Jane Debster boots I got when I was 18.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #946 on: August 06, 2013, 08:48:02 AM »
I peruse the flyers every week when they come out.  I write down anything I might be interested in and I make a separate grocery list for the things I definitely need.  Then when I'm ready to go shopping, I hit the one or two stores that let me buy most of the things I need on sale.

I have to shop with a list; otherwise, I forget most of the things I need and end up having to go back out.
Yes, but making a list so that you don't forget that you need nutmeg and butter and mushrooms is different from what the rest of us are talking about.  The save-money people say "Make a list and don't buy anything that isn't on the list."  So if you forget to put  sour cream on the list but you realize that you need it when you see it next to the butter, you're supposed to NOT buy it, even though you need it for the same recipe that the other things are for.

Really?  Well, that's just... DUMB!   :)
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

southern girl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #947 on: August 06, 2013, 08:50:27 AM »
I still have the 12 towels my parents bought me during my last year of college (75-76).  Now that we're using them for swim towels they're wearing out, but my gosh have those things lasted!  They weren't particularly expensive either.  I guess the fact that I got 12 towels and 6 washcloths for a single person made part of the difference.   :D

lady_disdain

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #948 on: August 06, 2013, 08:58:26 AM »
I peruse the flyers every week when they come out.  I write down anything I might be interested in and I make a separate grocery list for the things I definitely need.  Then when I'm ready to go shopping, I hit the one or two stores that let me buy most of the things I need on sale.

I have to shop with a list; otherwise, I forget most of the things I need and end up having to go back out.
Yes, but making a list so that you don't forget that you need nutmeg and butter and mushrooms is different from what the rest of us are talking about.  The save-money people say "Make a list and don't buy anything that isn't on the list."  So if you forget to put  sour cream on the list but you realize that you need it when you see it next to the butter, you're supposed to NOT buy it, even though you need it for the same recipe that the other things are for.

Really?  Well, that's just... DUMB!   :)

Not really. It depends on the situation and the person.

For example, someone who is very used to impulse purchases and just grabbing stuff may need the discipline of saying "this is what I am buying and only this". Otherwise, the habit of reaching out for something extra may be too strong. Or getting the on sale butter may also justify getting the cookies which are also on sale (but unnecessary).

Or someone who has the habit of stockpiling at home. Sure, the butter is on sale but the person already has butter in the fridge. In their mind, though, the sale justifies getting it even though it is not needed.

Is this true for everyone? No. But this kind of mental crutch may be necessary to break some habits or to change the person's spending mind set.  I am glad that most ehellions don't seem to need this sort of aid but please keep in mind that many people do and they do help those people.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #949 on: August 06, 2013, 09:02:24 AM »
But if you needed the sour cream to complete the recipe, why buy the other ingredients, even though they were on the list?  Would they get put back or purchased and then wasted because you didn't have what you needed to make the dish?  It just doesn't make any sense to me - the whole cutting off your nose to spite your face thing.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

dawbs

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #950 on: August 06, 2013, 09:12:41 AM »
Why is cat litter so darn expensive?

Because I will pay it to have good litter?
If the cheap stuff worked, I'd buy buckets of it too

TootsNYC

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #951 on: August 06, 2013, 09:22:41 AM »
But if you needed the sour cream to complete the recipe, why buy the other ingredients, even though they were on the list?  Would they get put back or purchased and then wasted because you didn't have what you needed to make the dish?  It just doesn't make any sense to me - the whole cutting off your nose to spite your face thing.

I would think that a sensible person following that strategy would say, "ingredients for the recipe" is what you put on the list, therefore qualifying the sour cream.

DollyPond

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #952 on: August 06, 2013, 09:24:49 AM »
I once saw a "money-saving tip" of buying ahoes at Payless.  Gee, that's nice but I need soles that won't destroy my aging feet.  The crazy thing was that this was supposed to save me 200 a month.  Yes, I checked it - A MONTH!!!!!  I might buy expensive shoes, but I spend closer to 200 per year.  AND each pair lasts me 3-5 years.

I'm 30 next year and I still have a pair of Jane Debster boots I got when I was 18.

Kino Sandals from Key West wear like iron.  I still have a pair that are 30 years old and still going strong. Comfy too!

Psychopoesie

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #953 on: August 06, 2013, 10:12:22 AM »
I have one aunt and uncle who budget very strictly. One way they decided to save money was by not buying deodorant, not washing their clothes as often (rewearing them) and not bathing as frequently (cuts down on the water bill).

This (and other economies) helped them save to go on a nice summer holiday. They stopped overnight at my mother's place on the way. I went over to have lunch with them. Both stank to high heaven. They seemed immune to the pungent aroma.

The temperatures were in the mid to high 30s (Celsius or 95+ Fahrenheit).

Think that's taking budgeting to extremes.




siamesecat2965

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #954 on: August 06, 2013, 11:39:23 AM »
'Don't replace your towels every year'? Good grief!

We have a few bar towels that still see good service in the kitchen.  Bought them a few years before our marriage and we've been married since 1983.

I have some towels that were my grandmother's and great aunt's. i like them as they are smaller, and thinner than today's bath towels, and perfect for my hair when I wash it. I'd say they date back to the 70's or before. My mom also has towels from my great aunt, who never married but treated herself to "nice things' including some very pricy monogrammed towels. Said great aunt passed way in the early 80's and the towels are still going strong!

Slartibartfast

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #955 on: August 06, 2013, 12:30:49 PM »
I have one aunt and uncle who budget very strictly. One way they decided to save money was by not buying deodorant, not washing their clothes as often (rewearing them) and not bathing as frequently (cuts down on the water bill).

This (and other economies) helped them save to go on a nice summer holiday. They stopped overnight at my mother's place on the way. I went over to have lunch with them. Both stank to high heaven. They seemed immune to the pungent aroma.

The temperatures were in the mid to high 30s (Celsius or 95+ Fahrenheit).

Think that's taking budgeting to extremes.

Deodorant is actually kinda optional for some people - DH stopped wearing it about a year ago unless he was expecting to be outdoors for a while on a hot day.  I've not noticed a difference in odor at all.  As I understand it, wearing deodorant all the time (the way we tend to do) messes up your perspiration, because deodorant works by physically jamming up the pores your sweat is supposed to come through.  Then, since your sweat is not producing the effect of cooling you down through evaporation, your body gets tricked into producing more and more of it.  When the deodorant does stop working (gets rubbed off or starts to break down), you stink more than you would if your body had just made a normal amount of sweat in the first place.

That's all with the caveat that everyone's body is different, and some people just naturally sweat more (and some people's sweat smells more) than others.  I'm not giving up my deodorant/clean clothes/showers anytime soon  ;D

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #956 on: August 06, 2013, 12:41:56 PM »
Justing being a bit pedantic here but technically, deodorant is just something to make you smell nice.  It's antiperspirant that is supposed to keep you from sweating.  But deodorant is easier to spell...   :D
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #957 on: August 06, 2013, 12:59:05 PM »
I had a little talk with the boys recently, not so much as a lecture or scolding, just passing information on, about what amount is worth spending on shoes.  I told them I don't really intend to spend much more than $30 on their shoes until their feet stop growing.  I go to Payless for their shoes and they seem to last pretty well. 

Last Friday I bought shoes for the older 2 and myself, went into Payless intending to get shoes for us all but in the whole section of women's size 8's, they had about 3 pairs of regular athletic shoes.  Everything else was a dressy kind of sneaker.  And the sneakers they did have weren't really in colors I liked.   I ended up getting a pair of New Balance at JcPenney for $35, as they were having a sale.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

z_squared82

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #958 on: August 06, 2013, 02:09:49 PM »
I call cheapskate on myself. Well, more frugal, but I occasionally veer into cheapskate territory before, you know, stopping myself.

I was going on a road trip with then BF. We both wanted to save money, so I suggested packing picnic lunches instead of stopping for fast food. I had him take some mustard packets from his work so we wouldnít have to deal with a bottle of mustard (or making sure it stayed cool enough). The ketchup and mayo packets were all from my stash of take-out leftovers (b/c I might have a problem hoarding condiments). Some might consider it theft, but he does now pack what was left in his lunch just to save time going down to the cafeteria. Itís not like heís hoarding them at home. Or emptying them into a regular-size bottle.

I also briefly considered saving aluminum cans for scrapping. Except I have an apartment, so I needed somewhere to store the cans, and if it was going to be on my balcony, the container needed to be squirrel-proof and look nice so as not to tick off the neighbors. A friend asked how many cans it would take me to recoup the cost of the $50 garbage can. I scrapped the scrapping idea.

At least I know I come by all this naturally. Iím finally breaking my father of his packrat tendencies (ďDad, those 10 riding lawnmower frames have been there for 20 years. How about you keep three and scrap the rest?Ē), but he does still dumpster dive on occasion. I especially like it when heís out on his mechanic job, and the people will ask him to throw away a perfectly nice -- if outdated -- piece of office furniture. The wooden pieces frequently take a detour to his truck. But he has found new homes for most of them, so it's not like they are cluttering up my parents' garage.

And my mother (who also washes out her plastic baggies which I then steal to use for non-food purposes b/c I find it kinda icky and want to take them out of food storage rotation) seems to think everything has a price. Iím cleaning out Dadís collection of Jim Beam decanters and Mom seems to think he should be able to get $20-$30/bottle. Most are listed on Etsy and eBay for $15-$20. The most Iíve ever sold one for was $12. I keep saying, ďItís only worth what someone is willing to pay for it.Ē

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #959 on: August 06, 2013, 02:34:21 PM »
I buy heavy duty ziploc freezer bags and I do rinse them out.  Anything that had meat or oil or anything particularly sticky?  Go in the trash.  But I wash the rest and reuse them, especially for giving away garden veggies, which I don't wash.  I let the user do that so they stay fresher longer.  I do it more for the environmental factor than the cheap factor, though.

I also use the rinsed out ones for organizing my yarn stash.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario