Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 218299 times)

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Tea Drinker

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #945 on: August 05, 2013, 09:21:04 PM »
From another angle, unless you live as close to the supermarket as I do right now (there is one in the apartment building I live in), extra shopping trips are likely to cost money, whether bus fare or gas and wear and tear on your car, as well as time. That's separate from whether you are more likely to grab random snacks, soda, etc. on those extra trips or, conversely, notice that they have butter on sale and you'll use it while it's still good.
Any advice that requires the use of a time machine may safely be ignored.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #946 on: August 05, 2013, 09:31:37 PM »
I peruse the flyers every week when they come out.  I write down anything I might be interested in and I make a separate grocery list for the things I definitely need.  Then when I'm ready to go shopping, I hit the one or two stores that let me buy most of the things I need on sale.

I have to shop with a list; otherwise, I forget most of the things I need and end up having to go back out.
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
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Elfmama

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #947 on: August 05, 2013, 10:52:23 PM »
I peruse the flyers every week when they come out.  I write down anything I might be interested in and I make a separate grocery list for the things I definitely need.  Then when I'm ready to go shopping, I hit the one or two stores that let me buy most of the things I need on sale.

I have to shop with a list; otherwise, I forget most of the things I need and end up having to go back out.
Yes, but making a list so that you don't forget that you need nutmeg and butter and mushrooms is different from what the rest of us are talking about.  The save-money people say "Make a list and don't buy anything that isn't on the list."  So if you forget to put  sour cream on the list but you realize that you need it when you see it next to the butter, you're supposed to NOT buy it, even though you need it for the same recipe that the other things are for.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
It's true. Money can't buy happiness.  You have to turn it
into books first.
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snowflake

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #948 on: August 06, 2013, 12:49:56 AM »
I once saw a "money-saving tip" of buying ahoes at Payless.  Gee, that's nice but I need soles that won't destroy my aging feet.  The crazy thing was that this was supposed to save me 200 a month.  Yes, I checked it - A MONTH!!!!!  I might buy expensive shoes, but I spend closer to 200 per year.  AND each pair lasts me 3-5 years.

zyrs

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #949 on: August 06, 2013, 04:57:39 AM »
We're pretty cheap wihen it comes to souvenirs. 

A fridge magnet is a must and, if available, a little box or basket made in the area.  We don't bother with anything else unless it's a real grabber.  I did splurge on a sweater in Iceland but that was a very rare case.

We don't bring tribute to anyone any more but, when in Baltimore we do load up on crab-themed stuff because we have a relative who collects things like that and has never been to Baltimore.

My go-to souvenir is a pressed penny. It's cheap, easy to carry and don't take up much room once you get them home. I have some books that display them on my mantle.

We do this too!

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #950 on: August 06, 2013, 05:29:12 AM »
I once saw a "money-saving tip" of buying ahoes at Payless.  Gee, that's nice but I need soles that won't destroy my aging feet.  The crazy thing was that this was supposed to save me 200 a month.  Yes, I checked it - A MONTH!!!!!  I might buy expensive shoes, but I spend closer to 200 per year.  AND each pair lasts me 3-5 years.

I'm 30 next year and I still have a pair of Jane Debster boots I got when I was 18.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #951 on: August 06, 2013, 09:48:02 AM »
I peruse the flyers every week when they come out.  I write down anything I might be interested in and I make a separate grocery list for the things I definitely need.  Then when I'm ready to go shopping, I hit the one or two stores that let me buy most of the things I need on sale.

I have to shop with a list; otherwise, I forget most of the things I need and end up having to go back out.
Yes, but making a list so that you don't forget that you need nutmeg and butter and mushrooms is different from what the rest of us are talking about.  The save-money people say "Make a list and don't buy anything that isn't on the list."  So if you forget to put  sour cream on the list but you realize that you need it when you see it next to the butter, you're supposed to NOT buy it, even though you need it for the same recipe that the other things are for.

Really?  Well, that's just... DUMB!   :)
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
Ontario

southern girl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #952 on: August 06, 2013, 09:50:27 AM »
I still have the 12 towels my parents bought me during my last year of college (75-76).  Now that we're using them for swim towels they're wearing out, but my gosh have those things lasted!  They weren't particularly expensive either.  I guess the fact that I got 12 towels and 6 washcloths for a single person made part of the difference.   :D

lady_disdain

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #953 on: August 06, 2013, 09:58:26 AM »
I peruse the flyers every week when they come out.  I write down anything I might be interested in and I make a separate grocery list for the things I definitely need.  Then when I'm ready to go shopping, I hit the one or two stores that let me buy most of the things I need on sale.

I have to shop with a list; otherwise, I forget most of the things I need and end up having to go back out.
Yes, but making a list so that you don't forget that you need nutmeg and butter and mushrooms is different from what the rest of us are talking about.  The save-money people say "Make a list and don't buy anything that isn't on the list."  So if you forget to put  sour cream on the list but you realize that you need it when you see it next to the butter, you're supposed to NOT buy it, even though you need it for the same recipe that the other things are for.

Really?  Well, that's just... DUMB!   :)

Not really. It depends on the situation and the person.

For example, someone who is very used to impulse purchases and just grabbing stuff may need the discipline of saying "this is what I am buying and only this". Otherwise, the habit of reaching out for something extra may be too strong. Or getting the on sale butter may also justify getting the cookies which are also on sale (but unnecessary).

Or someone who has the habit of stockpiling at home. Sure, the butter is on sale but the person already has butter in the fridge. In their mind, though, the sale justifies getting it even though it is not needed.

Is this true for everyone? No. But this kind of mental crutch may be necessary to break some habits or to change the person's spending mind set.  I am glad that most ehellions don't seem to need this sort of aid but please keep in mind that many people do and they do help those people.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #954 on: August 06, 2013, 10:02:24 AM »
But if you needed the sour cream to complete the recipe, why buy the other ingredients, even though they were on the list?  Would they get put back or purchased and then wasted because you didn't have what you needed to make the dish?  It just doesn't make any sense to me - the whole cutting off your nose to spite your face thing.
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
Ontario

dawbs

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #955 on: August 06, 2013, 10:12:41 AM »
Why is cat litter so darn expensive?

Because I will pay it to have good litter?
If the cheap stuff worked, I'd buy buckets of it too

TootsNYC

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #956 on: August 06, 2013, 10:22:41 AM »
But if you needed the sour cream to complete the recipe, why buy the other ingredients, even though they were on the list?  Would they get put back or purchased and then wasted because you didn't have what you needed to make the dish?  It just doesn't make any sense to me - the whole cutting off your nose to spite your face thing.

I would think that a sensible person following that strategy would say, "ingredients for the recipe" is what you put on the list, therefore qualifying the sour cream.

DollyPond

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #957 on: August 06, 2013, 10:24:49 AM »
I once saw a "money-saving tip" of buying ahoes at Payless.  Gee, that's nice but I need soles that won't destroy my aging feet.  The crazy thing was that this was supposed to save me 200 a month.  Yes, I checked it - A MONTH!!!!!  I might buy expensive shoes, but I spend closer to 200 per year.  AND each pair lasts me 3-5 years.

I'm 30 next year and I still have a pair of Jane Debster boots I got when I was 18.

Kino Sandals from Key West wear like iron.  I still have a pair that are 30 years old and still going strong. Comfy too!

Psychopoesie

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #958 on: August 06, 2013, 11:12:22 AM »
I have one aunt and uncle who budget very strictly. One way they decided to save money was by not buying deodorant, not washing their clothes as often (rewearing them) and not bathing as frequently (cuts down on the water bill).

This (and other economies) helped them save to go on a nice summer holiday. They stopped overnight at my mother's place on the way. I went over to have lunch with them. Both stank to high heaven. They seemed immune to the pungent aroma.

The temperatures were in the mid to high 30s (Celsius or 95+ Fahrenheit).

Think that's taking budgeting to extremes.




siamesecat2965

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #959 on: August 06, 2013, 12:39:23 PM »
'Don't replace your towels every year'? Good grief!

We have a few bar towels that still see good service in the kitchen.  Bought them a few years before our marriage and we've been married since 1983.

I have some towels that were my grandmother's and great aunt's. i like them as they are smaller, and thinner than today's bath towels, and perfect for my hair when I wash it. I'd say they date back to the 70's or before. My mom also has towels from my great aunt, who never married but treated herself to "nice things' including some very pricy monogrammed towels. Said great aunt passed way in the early 80's and the towels are still going strong!