Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 226141 times)

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Slartibartfast

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #960 on: August 06, 2013, 01:30:49 PM »
I have one aunt and uncle who budget very strictly. One way they decided to save money was by not buying deodorant, not washing their clothes as often (rewearing them) and not bathing as frequently (cuts down on the water bill).

This (and other economies) helped them save to go on a nice summer holiday. They stopped overnight at my mother's place on the way. I went over to have lunch with them. Both stank to high heaven. They seemed immune to the pungent aroma.

The temperatures were in the mid to high 30s (Celsius or 95+ Fahrenheit).

Think that's taking budgeting to extremes.

Deodorant is actually kinda optional for some people - DH stopped wearing it about a year ago unless he was expecting to be outdoors for a while on a hot day.  I've not noticed a difference in odor at all.  As I understand it, wearing deodorant all the time (the way we tend to do) messes up your perspiration, because deodorant works by physically jamming up the pores your sweat is supposed to come through.  Then, since your sweat is not producing the effect of cooling you down through evaporation, your body gets tricked into producing more and more of it.  When the deodorant does stop working (gets rubbed off or starts to break down), you stink more than you would if your body had just made a normal amount of sweat in the first place.

That's all with the caveat that everyone's body is different, and some people just naturally sweat more (and some people's sweat smells more) than others.  I'm not giving up my deodorant/clean clothes/showers anytime soon  ;D

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #961 on: August 06, 2013, 01:41:56 PM »
Justing being a bit pedantic here but technically, deodorant is just something to make you smell nice.  It's antiperspirant that is supposed to keep you from sweating.  But deodorant is easier to spell...   :D
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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #962 on: August 06, 2013, 01:59:05 PM »
I had a little talk with the boys recently, not so much as a lecture or scolding, just passing information on, about what amount is worth spending on shoes.  I told them I don't really intend to spend much more than $30 on their shoes until their feet stop growing.  I go to Payless for their shoes and they seem to last pretty well. 

Last Friday I bought shoes for the older 2 and myself, went into Payless intending to get shoes for us all but in the whole section of women's size 8's, they had about 3 pairs of regular athletic shoes.  Everything else was a dressy kind of sneaker.  And the sneakers they did have weren't really in colors I liked.   I ended up getting a pair of New Balance at JcPenney for $35, as they were having a sale.
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z_squared82

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #963 on: August 06, 2013, 03:09:49 PM »
I call cheapskate on myself. Well, more frugal, but I occasionally veer into cheapskate territory before, you know, stopping myself.

I was going on a road trip with then BF. We both wanted to save money, so I suggested packing picnic lunches instead of stopping for fast food. I had him take some mustard packets from his work so we wouldnt have to deal with a bottle of mustard (or making sure it stayed cool enough). The ketchup and mayo packets were all from my stash of take-out leftovers (b/c I might have a problem hoarding condiments). Some might consider it theft, but he does now pack what was left in his lunch just to save time going down to the cafeteria. Its not like hes hoarding them at home. Or emptying them into a regular-size bottle.

I also briefly considered saving aluminum cans for scrapping. Except I have an apartment, so I needed somewhere to store the cans, and if it was going to be on my balcony, the container needed to be squirrel-proof and look nice so as not to tick off the neighbors. A friend asked how many cans it would take me to recoup the cost of the $50 garbage can. I scrapped the scrapping idea.

At least I know I come by all this naturally. Im finally breaking my father of his packrat tendencies (Dad, those 10 riding lawnmower frames have been there for 20 years. How about you keep three and scrap the rest?), but he does still dumpster dive on occasion. I especially like it when hes out on his mechanic job, and the people will ask him to throw away a perfectly nice -- if outdated -- piece of office furniture. The wooden pieces frequently take a detour to his truck. But he has found new homes for most of them, so it's not like they are cluttering up my parents' garage.

And my mother (who also washes out her plastic baggies which I then steal to use for non-food purposes b/c I find it kinda icky and want to take them out of food storage rotation) seems to think everything has a price. Im cleaning out Dads collection of Jim Beam decanters and Mom seems to think he should be able to get $20-$30/bottle. Most are listed on Etsy and eBay for $15-$20. The most Ive ever sold one for was $12. I keep saying, Its only worth what someone is willing to pay for it.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #964 on: August 06, 2013, 03:34:21 PM »
I buy heavy duty ziploc freezer bags and I do rinse them out.  Anything that had meat or oil or anything particularly sticky?  Go in the trash.  But I wash the rest and reuse them, especially for giving away garden veggies, which I don't wash.  I let the user do that so they stay fresher longer.  I do it more for the environmental factor than the cheap factor, though.

I also use the rinsed out ones for organizing my yarn stash.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
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bopper

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #965 on: August 06, 2013, 03:58:26 PM »

My go-to souvenir is a pressed penny. It's cheap, easy to carry and don't take up much room once you get them home. I have some books that display them on my mantle.

Same here. We have fun with them, there is a website http://www.pennycollector.com/ that has locators for them if you want to know where to go when you are on vacation/road tripping / collecting. Also, an M&M mini tube is just the right size for quarters and pennys. We stack them in the tube 2 quarters then a penny so that we always have the right coins for it.

Pre 1982 pennies so they are all copper and no zinc sandwich filling.

veryfluffy

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #966 on: August 06, 2013, 05:48:38 PM »

Deodorant is actually kinda optional for some people - DH stopped wearing it about a year ago unless he was expecting to be outdoors for a while on a hot day.  I've not noticed a difference in odor at all. 

You might find this interesting:
http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/even-if-you-dont-smell-you-probably-use-deodorant

   

hobish

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #967 on: August 06, 2013, 06:07:06 PM »
'Don't replace your towels every year'? Good grief!

We have a few bar towels that still see good service in the kitchen.  Bought them a few years before our marriage and we've been married since 1983.

I have some towels that were my grandmother's and great aunt's. i like them as they are smaller, and thinner than today's bath towels, and perfect for my hair when I wash it. I'd say they date back to the 70's or before. My mom also has towels from my great aunt, who never married but treated herself to "nice things' including some very pricy monogrammed towels. Said great aunt passed way in the early 80's and the towels are still going strong!

Oh, man. Old threadbare towels are what i find to be best when wrapping my wet hair in. They work and feel and stay up better than any of those products marketed for it that i have tried. I had one that was perfect, but it accidentally got shredded for rags.
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siamesecat2965

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #968 on: August 06, 2013, 07:05:47 PM »
'Don't replace your towels every year'? Good grief!

We have a few bar towels that still see good service in the kitchen.  Bought them a few years before our marriage and we've been married since 1983.

I have some towels that were my grandmother's and great aunt's. i like them as they are smaller, and thinner than today's bath towels, and perfect for my hair when I wash it. I'd say they date back to the 70's or before. My mom also has towels from my great aunt, who never married but treated herself to "nice things' including some very pricy monogrammed towels. Said great aunt passed way in the early 80's and the towels are still going strong!

Oh, man. Old threadbare towels are what i find to be best when wrapping my wet hair in. They work and feel and stay up better than any of those products marketed for it that i have tried. I had one that was perfect, but it accidentally got shredded for rags.

They do! the really thick ones are hard to wrap around your hair. I did manage to find some a few years back at target, same size, and same thickness. kicking myself i only bought 3. they're smaller than bath towels, but much larger than hand.

i got some of those turban towel thingys two years in a for Christmas from the same relative. I don't really care for them as they are thin, my hair is thick, and as soon as i put one on, its soaked through.

jedikaiti

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #969 on: August 06, 2013, 07:06:55 PM »
I got one of those just-for-hair towels once - thing didn't absorb for squat. The paper-thin beach towel I got a few years ago as a blood donation reward? Works great.
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Psychopoesie

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #970 on: August 06, 2013, 08:36:44 PM »
I have one aunt and uncle who budget very strictly. One way they decided to save money was by not buying deodorant, not washing their clothes as often (rewearing them) and not bathing as frequently (cuts down on the water bill).

This (and other economies) helped them save to go on a nice summer holiday. They stopped overnight at my mother's place on the way. I went over to have lunch with them. Both stank to high heaven. They seemed immune to the pungent aroma.

The temperatures were in the mid to high 30s (Celsius or 95+ Fahrenheit).

Think that's taking budgeting to extremes.

Deodorant is actually kinda optional for some people - DH stopped wearing it about a year ago unless he was expecting to be outdoors for a while on a hot day.  I've not noticed a difference in odor at all.  As I understand it, wearing deodorant all the time (the way we tend to do) messes up your perspiration, because deodorant works by physically jamming up the pores your sweat is supposed to come through.  Then, since your sweat is not producing the effect of cooling you down through evaporation, your body gets tricked into producing more and more of it.  When the deodorant does stop working (gets rubbed off or starts to break down), you stink more than you would if your body had just made a normal amount of sweat in the first place.

That's all with the caveat that everyone's body is different, and some people just naturally sweat more (and some people's sweat smells more) than others.  I'm not giving up my deodorant/clean clothes/showers anytime soon  ;D


I wish the aunt & uncle were in this category. It was bad. Not just a bit whiffy. Sort of like is-breathing-optional-and-for-how-long bad.

Personally, use deodorant, not antiperspirant. So not blocking pores. Even so, based on the few times i've forgotten it, going without wouldn't work in summer for me either.

Do remember watching an interesting BBC (?) doco a few years ago about someone who stopped using any products or washing. Found an article about it.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-477378/Six-weeks-wash-The-soapless-experiment.html

siamesecat2965

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #971 on: August 06, 2013, 08:59:54 PM »


Do remember watching an interesting BBC (?) doco a few years ago about someone who stopped using any products or washing. Found an article about it.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-477378/Six-weeks-wash-The-soapless-experiment.html

just read the article, and ick. no way i could do that, esp exercising every day.  blech. I kind of get where she was coming from but not brushing your teeth? Oh no. I sweat a lot and it makes me itchy. i'd have no skin left if i did that.  I can see forgoing certain products, but doing nothing at all? no way

I will admit i don't wash my hair every day, 2-3 times a week but when it looks and feels icky, i do. I am also guilty, on weekends when i don't leave my apt, of realizing late in the afternoon, hey, my teeth feel fuzzy, EWWW i forgot to brush (detest the taste of toothpaste with coffee). but that's less than 24 hours, not 6 weeks.

Ick. Jus

Redwing

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #972 on: August 07, 2013, 10:14:30 AM »
Read the article as well.  I could never do an experiment like that!  I could live without deoderant I think because I seldom sweat.  But no bathing?  Not to mention the not brushing your teeth. 

magicdomino

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #973 on: August 07, 2013, 10:30:25 AM »
In the article, she mentions that people didn't seem to notice.  I suspect most of those people were just trying to be polite, thinking that she was ill.  She also works mostly at home, so there wasn't an opportunity for an anonymous someone to leave anti-perspirant on her desk.

I do agree that not using eye make-up helped the cyst on her eye heal, and that most of the goop that she was originally using didn't do much of anything.  Doesn't mean I'm giving up my daily shower.

suzieQ

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #974 on: August 07, 2013, 10:36:49 AM »
In the article, she mentions that people didn't seem to notice.  I suspect most of those people were just trying to be polite, thinking that she was ill.  She also works mostly at home, so there wasn't an opportunity for an anonymous someone to leave anti-perspirant on her desk.

I do agree that not using eye make-up helped the cyst on her eye heal, and that most of the goop that she was originally using didn't do much of anything.  Doesn't mean I'm giving up my daily shower.

Great big POD to that. No way would I tell an acquaintance that they stink. I would try to not stand near them, but I wouldn't say anything. Only time I would offer an opinion on BO would be if a friend asked me if they had it.
Now, my DS has BO and I don't hesitate to tell him (not that he does anything about it) but I have to live with him. Methinks her children refusing to snuggle with her should have been a huge red flag about the state of her body. Children don't do the white lie to make you feel better (for the most part) like adults do.
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