Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 212158 times)

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Octavia

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #15 on: March 31, 2013, 04:46:41 PM »
When I was a child, my parents would lie about my age to get the lower price for tickets to the fair, theme parks, and other events. I was small for my age so no one suspected I was older than they said. In order to keep me quiet, my parents used to tell me that everyone lies about these things. I always wondered how common that type of lie really is?
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reflection5

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #16 on: March 31, 2013, 04:50:06 PM »
Quote
One particular uncle thinks a quarter is an excellent tip no matter what the bill total.  He's older and I think he's still in the mind-set where a nickel would get you a cup of coffee and a sandwich.

Yeah, I've seen this.  Or people who just empty (most of) the change in their pocket.   35 cents, a dollar and 7 cents, whatever.  On a $40 tab.

weeblewobble

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #17 on: March 31, 2013, 04:54:22 PM »
- The friend's mother who will take anything not nailed down in a hotel room.  The management expects you to take the shampoo and soap.  However, taking towels, pillows, ashtrays, the batteries from the remote when possible, that's a little extreme.

- A former friend who thought she was terribly clever to order just a small side salad and water, then she would ask to try "just a bite" of everybody else's dinner. She would find something she liked on the table and say, "Oh, it's so good, could I try just one tiny bit more?"   Before you knew it, you'd shared half of your meal with her. 

- I have various elderly relatives who will re-use coffee filters, tea bags, paper towels, ziplock bags, and bacon grease (not that unusual, but it doesn't seem healthy to leave a constantly circulating batch of it sitting in an open coffee can at room temperature by your stove.)

Jocelyn

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #18 on: March 31, 2013, 04:58:10 PM »
My mother will use one end of a tissue, then save it to use the other end later.
And she wonders why colds last so much longer for her than for people who dispose of the tissue instead of using it twice.

faithlessone

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #19 on: March 31, 2013, 05:07:37 PM »
When I was a child, my parents would lie about my age to get the lower price for tickets to the fair, theme parks, and other events. I was small for my age so no one suspected I was older than they said. In order to keep me quiet, my parents used to tell me that everyone lies about these things. I always wondered how common that type of lie really is?

My parents used to do it - and I'm only 24. I remember it was particularly at a local tourist attraction that would let you in for free if you were under 10. I was small for my age, and my parents were still blagging me in when I was 14! I know that my aunts and uncles did it/still do it, and several of my parents' friends have done it.

I suspect it's a far more widespread practice than people might imagine.

SoCalVal

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #20 on: March 31, 2013, 05:10:15 PM »
My mother will use one end of a tissue, then save it to use the other end later.
And she wonders why colds last so much longer for her than for people who dispose of the tissue instead of using it twice.

Okay, call me cheap, but I'm regularly in the habit of tearing the tissue in half and using just one half and putting the other back on top of the box (I don't do this with tissue boxes other than the ones at my house or on my desk at work -- the tissue box at work isn't readily accessible by anyone else).  I learned this years ago as a way to be "thrifty," and I've found I typically really only need half a tissue.  Community tissue boxes I will just take the entire tissue as I'm sure others wouldn't feel comfortable about getting someone else's half-tissue (even if it's unused since the other person touched it).



reflection5

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #21 on: March 31, 2013, 05:11:13 PM »
Quote
- The friend's mother who will take anything not nailed down in a hotel room.  The management expects you to take the shampoo and soap.  However, taking towels, pillows, ashtrays, the batteries from the remote when possible, that's a little extreme.

Oh for goodness sakes.   ::)

weeblewobble

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #22 on: March 31, 2013, 05:13:35 PM »
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- The friend's mother who will take anything not nailed down in a hotel room.  The management expects you to take the shampoo and soap.  However, taking towels, pillows, ashtrays, the batteries from the remote when possible, that's a little extreme.

Oh for goodness sakes.   ::)

Yep, she really gripes about hotels that fix it so you can't open the back of the remote to remove the batteries, "Like they don't trust their customers, how rude!"   ::)

weeblewobble

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #23 on: March 31, 2013, 05:16:43 PM »
When I was a child, my parents would lie about my age to get the lower price for tickets to the fair, theme parks, and other events. I was small for my age so no one suspected I was older than they said. In order to keep me quiet, my parents used to tell me that everyone lies about these things. I always wondered how common that type of lie really is?

My parents used to do it - and I'm only 24. I remember it was particularly at a local tourist attraction that would let you in for free if you were under 10. I was small for my age, and my parents were still blagging me in when I was 14! I know that my aunts and uncles did it/still do it, and several of my parents' friends have done it.

I suspect it's a far more widespread practice than people might imagine.

Both of our kids are very tall for their age.  We give their real ages at attractions where you get a discount for younger kids and get the stinkeye from the staff.  You can tell they're reluctant to believe us because they've been lied to before.  :(

reflection5

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #24 on: March 31, 2013, 05:18:45 PM »
weeblewobble, I am cracking up!  My eyes rolled out of their sockets a few minutes ago.

Batteries from remote.  That's as bad as taking lightbulbs and rolls of toilet paper.  And please don't tell me she takes those.  :D

I do know of a guy who took a huge roll of toilet paper from a public rest room, then swore he bought it.  Yeah. Sure.  As if people don't know the difference.

andi

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #25 on: March 31, 2013, 05:54:47 PM »
When I was a child, my parents would lie about my age to get the lower price for tickets to the fair, theme parks, and other events. I was small for my age so no one suspected I was older than they said. In order to keep me quiet, my parents used to tell me that everyone lies about these things. I always wondered how common that type of lie really is?

I was in a playgroup where several of the moms would do this.  Drove me batty.

CakeEater

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #26 on: March 31, 2013, 06:35:27 PM »
When I was a child, my parents would lie about my age to get the lower price for tickets to the fair, theme parks, and other events. I was small for my age so no one suspected I was older than they said. In order to keep me quiet, my parents used to tell me that everyone lies about these things. I always wondered how common that type of lie really is?

My parents used to do it - and I'm only 24. I remember it was particularly at a local tourist attraction that would let you in for free if you were under 10. I was small for my age, and my parents were still blagging me in when I was 14! I know that my aunts and uncles did it/still do it, and several of my parents' friends have done it.

I suspect it's a far more widespread practice than people might imagine.

Both of our kids are very tall for their age.  We give their real ages at attractions where you get a discount for younger kids and get the stinkeye from the staff.  You can tell they're reluctant to believe us because they've been lied to before.  :(

I remember my mother taking my brother's and my birth certificates to a theme park once when we were kids for this reason. I might need to do the same for my kids in a couple of years' time.


Library Dragon

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #27 on: March 31, 2013, 06:39:35 PM »
The first Christmas after MIL died FIL came for a visit.  DS1 went into the kitchen and asked what are all these paper things on the counter?  FIL washed all the paper plates from a litte gathering the night before.  I would have chalked it up to just wing helpful, but it was a constant disagreement about washing disposable cups, forks, etc.  I figure its my once a year decadence. 

People who steal toilet paper is a big complaint in libraries.  It comes up a lot on listservs. We put up a nice holder for plastic bags by the baby changing table.  It lasted a day.  Now we have an empty tissue box screwed onto the wall.  It looks strange, but no one steals it.

I am cheap in certain areas.  It equalizes out my splurges.  I make my own dish washing and laundry detergents, body scrubs, shave cream, etc.  I still cut up old tshirts for rags.  All my last bits of yarn are saved for random projects.  Many times people think we're not home because there is only 1 light on. 

Add me to the list of young looking kids passed as off as younger for discounts at "smorgasbord" (the height of good eating in S. California when I was young *** years ago), movies, theme parks. 

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kherbert05

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #28 on: March 31, 2013, 06:54:39 PM »
Personally I think the hotels should charge the credit card of people that take things from the room.


One time in San Antonio we were staying in a nice midrange hotel. We had gone swimming and hung the swimsuits and towels on the shower curtain rod to dry while we were at lunch. Don't remember how but they all ended up in the tub soaked and we needed to pack. Mom sent me to the front desk to buy towels to wrap the wet mess in - hurt their brains. The manager let us buy some towels - but he was stunned we didn't just steal them.


I had a relative who used to reuse food containers for food storage. Used to drive my Mom batty because many of the containers were not meant for reuse. You never knew what a contain might contain or how long it had been in the frig or pantry. (Mom was a stickler for food safety only containers meant for reuse were reused and everything was labeled and dated. )


Loren and Brett are tall for their age. We have run into the "s/he isn't really (real age)" problem.
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snappylt

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #29 on: March 31, 2013, 06:56:11 PM »
When I was a child, my parents would lie about my age to get the lower price for tickets to the fair, theme parks, and other events. I was small for my age so no one suspected I was older than they said. In order to keep me quiet, my parents used to tell me that everyone lies about these things. I always wondered how common that type of lie really is?

This bothers me on two levels.  One, it is stealing a service by paying less than the posted price, so it is wrong because it is theft.  Two, it's teaching children by example that lying and stealing are OK.

One of our children was smaller than many his age and there was a time or two many years ago that my wife suggested we should pay less than the correct price for his true age.  I said no, because I wanted to make a point teaching honesty by example.  (Our boys were very observant; they'd have noticed and remembered if we had lied about their ages.)