News: IMPORTANT UPDATE REGARDING SITE IN FORUM ANNOUNCEMENT FOLDER.

  • May 25, 2018, 05:59:52 AM

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 625809 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Slartibartfast

  • Member
  • Posts: 10801
    • Nerdy Necklaces - my Etsy shop!
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #30 on: March 31, 2013, 08:31:18 PM »
We don't really "do" Easter at our house, but MIL came over with a giant wrapped basket for Babybartfast and Bittybartfast earlier this week so I figured it wouldn't hurt to open it up today.  I think she said it was from her MIL (DH's grandmother).  It was a beautiful basket, stuffed to the brim . . . with ratty, nasty, cheap stuffed animals.  I think she bought a small commercial basket with (cheap) candy in it, then added a bunch of stuffed rabbits and ducks she found at thrift stores or that people left behind at her rental properties and repackaged the whole thing into a bigger basket.  Several were grungy and one of them stank of cigarette smoke.

Babybartfast got to keep the candy (which was wrapped, thank goodness) and one cheap-but-new-looking toy, and the rest are going straight back to Goodwill.

Jocelyn

  • Member
  • Posts: 2013
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #31 on: March 31, 2013, 08:34:00 PM »
My mother will use one end of a tissue, then save it to use the other end later.
And she wonders why colds last so much longer for her than for people who dispose of the tissue instead of using it twice.

Okay, call me cheap, but I'm regularly in the habit of tearing the tissue in half and using just one half and putting the other back on top of the box (I don't do this with tissue boxes other than the ones at my house or on my desk at work -- the tissue box at work isn't readily accessible by anyone else).  I learned this years ago as a way to be "thrifty," and I've found I typically really only need half a tissue.  Community tissue boxes I will just take the entire tissue as I'm sure others wouldn't feel comfortable about getting someone else's half-tissue (even if it's unused since the other person touched it).
I have no problem with someone doing this. However, what my mother does is carry the used tissue around with her until she needs to use the other half.

FauxFoodist

  • Member
  • Posts: 5015
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #32 on: March 31, 2013, 08:50:52 PM »
My mother will use one end of a tissue, then save it to use the other end later.
And she wonders why colds last so much longer for her than for people who dispose of the tissue instead of using it twice.

Okay, call me cheap, but I'm regularly in the habit of tearing the tissue in half and using just one half and putting the other back on top of the box (I don't do this with tissue boxes other than the ones at my house or on my desk at work -- the tissue box at work isn't readily accessible by anyone else).  I learned this years ago as a way to be "thrifty," and I've found I typically really only need half a tissue.  Community tissue boxes I will just take the entire tissue as I'm sure others wouldn't feel comfortable about getting someone else's half-tissue (even if it's unused since the other person touched it).
I have no problem with someone doing this. However, what my mother does is carry the used tissue around with her until she needs to use the other half.

I haven't thought about the continuing-one's-illness aspect of it, but I'll admit to not yet throwing out a tissue if I've only used part of it (although I'll more likely tear off the used part and discard that).  It isn't to cut down on cost though; I'm reluctant to increase my use of disposable items if I don't have to (and I use a lot of paper products, like tissues and napkins).  That's a practice I don't do in front of others though.

Luci

  • Member
  • Posts: 7833
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #33 on: March 31, 2013, 09:02:00 PM »
I know an older man living alone who keeps the house at 50 F. I could almost, deal with 60, but 50 is just too low. His sister wouldn't stay with him after he had surgery unless he put the house up to at least 65. He had to think long and hard about that.

He also only uses night lights except for maybe one reading light sometimes, even in the dead of winter. We worry that he may fall, and we worry that it so much looks like no one is home that someone may break in, be surprised by his presence and hurt him.

Once, years ago, we were having a staffing at the nursing home for his mother. Since Walgreen's was having a sale on soap and another store was having a sale on pizza, and both were on his way, he stopped and held up 3 family members and 2 professionals for 1/2 hour. Cost to the county? No idea. (I don't remember why he couldn't do those errands on the way home.)

He wears all of his clothing 3 days and only does the laundry once a month.

Worst, worst: he only flushes the toilet every couple of days. No one drops by to see him anymore, of course.

BatCity

  • Member
  • Posts: 1351
    • Duct Tape and Chicken Wire
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #34 on: March 31, 2013, 09:08:07 PM »
Many years ago, my parents passed my little brother as a baby so they didn't have to buy him a plane ticket. He was three. In their defense, they weren't being cheap as much as desperate, as for some long-forgotten reason the trip was an emergency that they couldn't afford and they had three small kids.

What really made it a bummer is that my older brother and I got to visit the cockpit and the captain gave us flight wings. Little bro has never forgotten this.

This must have been around 1972 or so. dingdangity, I feel old.

reflection5

  • Member
  • Posts: 436
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #35 on: March 31, 2013, 09:08:32 PM »
Quote
Personally I think the hotels should charge the credit card of people that take things from the room.
It's my understanding that some hotels DO, especially when it's discovered the guest stole things ike towels and bed linen.  I hear they charge a pretty penny.

Mad Goat Woman, love the "Pam" stories.  More, please!   :D

Pam sounds like my ex-friend “V”.  She was a very calculating cheapskate and a manipulative liar (which is one of many reasons she is an ex-friend).  She still owes me a total of almost $200 for two separate not-so-slick tricks she pulled several years ago.  One had to do with non-refundable air fare (long convoluted story).  The other was an event where she claimed to have no money (although she had bought a brand new car the week before and still kept her mani-pedi appointment the next day).  I steered her to an ATM but she “forgot” her code, and it was one excuse after another.  I wrote off the $200 and our so-called friendship.



Bijou

  • Member
  • Posts: 13551
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #36 on: March 31, 2013, 09:09:16 PM »
Reusing dental floss.
I've never knitted anything I could recognize when it was finished.  Actually, I've never finished anything, much to my family's relief.

gramma dishes

  • Member
  • Posts: 7752
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #37 on: March 31, 2013, 09:12:31 PM »
I know an older man living alone who keeps the house at 50 F. I could almost, deal with 60, but 50 is just too low. His sister wouldn't stay with him after he had surgery unless he put the house up to at least 65. He had to think long and hard about that.

He also only uses night lights except for maybe one reading light sometimes, even in the dead of winter. We worry that he may fall, and we worry that it so much looks like no one is home that someone may break in, be surprised by his presence and hurt him.

Once, years ago, we were having a staffing at the nursing home for his mother. Since Walgreen's was having a sale on soap and another store was having a sale on pizza, and both were on his way, he stopped and held up 3 family members and 2 professionals for 1/2 hour. Cost to the county? No idea. (I don't remember why he couldn't do those errands on the way home.)

He wears all of his clothing 3 days and only does the laundry once a month.

Worst, worst: he only flushes the toilet every couple of days. No one drops by to see him anymore, of course.

This is just so incredibly sad.

I think it's just that he's so afraid that he's going to run out of money.  I've heard of this and seen it for myself before. 

reflection5

  • Member
  • Posts: 436
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #38 on: March 31, 2013, 09:14:15 PM »
Reusing dental floss.

Oh no.  Just nooooooooo. :o

Bijou

  • Member
  • Posts: 13551
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #39 on: March 31, 2013, 09:54:04 PM »
Reusing dental floss.

Oh no.  Just nooooooooo. :o
My sentiments, exactly... :o
I've never knitted anything I could recognize when it was finished.  Actually, I've never finished anything, much to my family's relief.

Jules1980

  • Member
  • Posts: 685
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #40 on: March 31, 2013, 10:18:39 PM »
When I was a child, my parents would lie about my age to get the lower price for tickets to the fair, theme parks, and other events. I was small for my age so no one suspected I was older than they said. In order to keep me quiet, my parents used to tell me that everyone lies about these things. I always wondered how common that type of lie really is?

This bothers me on two levels.  One, it is stealing a service by paying less than the posted price, so it is wrong because it is theft.  Two, it's teaching children by example that lying and stealing are OK.

One of our children was smaller than many his age and there was a time or two many years ago that my wife suggested we should pay less than the correct price for his true age.  I said no, because I wanted to make a point teaching honesty by example.  (Our boys were very observant; they'd have noticed and remembered if we had lied about their ages.)

I was small for my age and though my parents didn't lie about my age, there were a few times they were given the discount and didn't realize it until smaller plates of food came out.  One restuarant was just determined that I was not 10 and that I couldn't eat an adult portion of boiled shrimp and would bring me the kid's fried plate.  Not cool.

Paper Roses

  • Member
  • Posts: 4907
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #41 on: March 31, 2013, 10:38:25 PM »
. . . Several were grungy and one of them stank of cigarette smoke.

Babybartfast got to keep the candy (which was wrapped, thank goodness) and one cheap-but-new-looking toy, and the rest are going straight back to Goodwill.

So they aren't good enough for you or your child, but they're good enough for Goodwill?  Why do you think Goodwill would want them?

All those with two, draw one.  All those with none, turn one in.

Luci

  • Member
  • Posts: 7833
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #42 on: March 31, 2013, 10:41:50 PM »
. . . Several were grungy and one of them stank of cigarette smoke.

Babybartfast got to keep the candy (which was wrapped, thank goodness) and one cheap-but-new-looking toy, and the rest are going straight back to Goodwill.

So they aren't good enough for you or your child, but they're good enough for Goodwill?  Why do you think Goodwill would want them?

Agree.

jedikaiti

  • Swiss Army Nerd
  • Member
  • Posts: 2908
  • A pie in the hand is worth two in the mail.
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #43 on: March 31, 2013, 10:45:58 PM »
Quote
- The friend's mother who will take anything not nailed down in a hotel room.  The management expects you to take the shampoo and soap.  However, taking towels, pillows, ashtrays, the batteries from the remote when possible, that's a little extreme.

Oh for goodness sakes.   ::)

Yep, she really gripes about hotels that fix it so you can't open the back of the remote to remove the batteries, "Like they don't trust their customers, how rude!"   ::)

How many hotels has she been banned from?
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

kckgirl

  • Member
  • Posts: 3024
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #44 on: March 31, 2013, 11:30:02 PM »
Babybartfast got to keep the candy (which was wrapped, thank goodness) and one cheap-but-new-looking toy, and the rest are going straight back to Goodwill.

I think you should reconsider going to Goodwill and trash the ratty, smelly toys.