Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 131299 times)

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Yvaine

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #255 on: April 02, 2013, 05:05:48 PM »
Barb3000 wrote:

"They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her."

Well, she paid for tea and didn't get a tea bag, so I don't think this is cheapskate behavior.  I understand this sort of "it's the principle of the thing" reaction.

Virg

Well, no, she paid for her hot water, which happened to be the same price as the tea. It's like if I order a slice of cheese pizza and my friend orders pepperoni. Do I get to ask for "my" pepperoni after the fact just because the slices are the same price?

Unless she specifically asked "Is there a charge for hot water?" and was told no, she had no reason to assume it would be free.

Ah, gotcha. I was thinking they charged her for tea under the assumption that she was going to dunk her husband's tea bag in her water (but that the water would have been free if they hadn't made that assumption).

Chip2

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #256 on: April 02, 2013, 05:08:02 PM »
Loving this thread! A lot of these stories sound so familiar.

And I like the idea of bringing a tall child's birth certificate to places like buffets and amusement parks. I was a tall child and my parents sometimes got the stinkeye from staff who thought we were trying to get in on the cheep. DD is 6 years old but looks closer to 8.

I always got around that problem with my kids by pointing at the child in question and asking, "How old are you?"

bloo

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #257 on: April 02, 2013, 05:16:16 PM »
Barb3000 wrote:

"They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her."

Well, she paid for tea and didn't get a tea bag, so I don't think this is cheapskate behavior.  I understand this sort of "it's the principle of the thing" reaction.

Virg

Well, no, she paid for her hot water, which happened to be the same price as the tea. It's like if I order a slice of cheese pizza and my friend orders pepperoni. Do I get to ask for "my" pepperoni after the fact just because the slices are the same price?

Unless she specifically asked "Is there a charge for hot water?" and was told no, she had no reason to assume it would be free.

Is it because I worked in restaurants that this last post makes total sense to me? When I was bartending, anything that was a pain always costs more. So water, which should presumably be free, would cost something, if it had to be heated up. No drinks station I've ever worked with was set up for that (probably different now). Since I wasn't allowed near the stoves, I'd have to take a coffee mug and walk all the way back to the prep kitchens to use the microwave and sit there while it heated up. That meant no one was working the bar or only one bartender was at the bar working or making drinks for the bar/service station. We offered one type of tea. Could you tell this particular restaurant discouraged hot tea service?

Nowadays, I imagine, they'd have a hot water spigot for instant hot water since a lot of people really enjoy hot tea.

Hot tea and a basket selection of teas was ordered through the bar of one restaurant I worked in since only the bartender had access to exclusively hot water. Since an order had to be rang through the computer to get to the bar, there would be a charge for it.

Honestly, though, I would have just nuked some hot water in a cup in the prep kitchen there too if I'd ever been presented with that situation. I'd be embarrassed at charging a patron for hot water (and would assume it would affect my tip). It was beyond my capabilities of communication to explain to people why things that were more labor intensive, were more expensive, even if the materials themselves were cheap.

bloo

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #258 on: April 02, 2013, 05:22:03 PM »
Loving this thread! A lot of these stories sound so familiar.

And I like the idea of bringing a tall child's birth certificate to places like buffets and amusement parks. I was a tall child and my parents sometimes got the stinkeye from staff who thought we were trying to get in on the cheep. DD is 6 years old but looks closer to 8.

I always got around that problem with my kids by pointing at the child in question and asking, "How old are you?"

This is a good one!

When my kids were younger, 8 and 6, we went to an all-you-can-eat Asian buffet. The type that had lots of seafood and the most amazing variety of sushi! The waitstaff asked how old my kids were and I told them and it turns out the had a discount by age. If your kid is 6 you pay X, if your kid is 8, you pay X+2 and so forth. I laughed and fully betted on them charging us full adult price for my son as he LOVES seafood and sushi.

They were nervous about handing us the bill, but we all burst out laughing when we saw he had, in fact, been charged for an adult plate. Since he ate twice as much as any of the adults, we absolutely did not quibble over the bill and tipped well!

Yvaine

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #259 on: April 02, 2013, 05:33:51 PM »
Loving this thread! A lot of these stories sound so familiar.

And I like the idea of bringing a tall child's birth certificate to places like buffets and amusement parks. I was a tall child and my parents sometimes got the stinkeye from staff who thought we were trying to get in on the cheep. DD is 6 years old but looks closer to 8.

I always got around that problem with my kids by pointing at the child in question and asking, "How old are you?"

This is a good one!

When my kids were younger, 8 and 6, we went to an all-you-can-eat Asian buffet. The type that had lots of seafood and the most amazing variety of sushi! The waitstaff asked how old my kids were and I told them and it turns out the had a discount by age. If your kid is 6 you pay X, if your kid is 8, you pay X+2 and so forth. I laughed and fully betted on them charging us full adult price for my son as he LOVES seafood and sushi.

They were nervous about handing us the bill, but we all burst out laughing when we saw he had, in fact, been charged for an adult plate. Since he ate twice as much as any of the adults, we absolutely did not quibble over the bill and tipped well!

When I was about 10, one buffet started charging kids by their weight--1 cent per pound the kid weighed. My parents would take us there and not buy themselves anything but raid our plates. Well, the buffet got wise to that and started allowing the discount only with the purchase of an adult meal for each kids' meal.

I always joked that at least they weren't weighing us on the way out, too, and charging based on the difference.  ;D

squeakers

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #260 on: April 02, 2013, 05:42:53 PM »

I loved the dispenser at the last hotel we stayed at so much that I bought one for our bathroom.  Those teeny bottles of shampoo barely get my waist length hair washed so being able to squirt as much as I needed was awesome.  And when we travel as a family the 2-4 tiny bottles are not enough for a family of 5 (we get 2 king/queen beds and either a suite with a couch or book a roll-away bed.  Then the boys fight over who gets to sleep on the couch/roll-away.) So we end up breaking out either multiple teeny bottles from our stash (DH travels a lot for work) or we go buy a big bottle that hopefully won't get spilled on the way home.  BTDT and at least it was all dirty clothes that got extra clean when washed.

I've never seen the dispensers, but I would LOVE them. I too have a ton of hair, and so does my boyfriend, and the little bottles are often not enough. Plus it's got to be greener to not have all those little bottles to deal with.


http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001CD31XM/ref=oh_details_o03_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 is the one I bought.  There are more expensive/fancy ones and cheaper ones but I really liked it having 4 dispensers.  We use 1 for shampoo, 1 for conditioner and 2 for body wash. The boys like Axe thus 2 different body washes  :P  It mounted easily and has had constant usage for 4 months now and still works great. I do think it should have been mounted a little further to the back of the tubstall but since middle son did it I won't complain.  He even marked all 4 dispensers with marker so I wouldn't end up using bodywash as shampoo accidentally  ;D
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Barb3000

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #261 on: April 02, 2013, 05:44:24 PM »
Barb3000 wrote:

"They are at a restaurant, John has hot tea to drink, Mary has hot water. As they are paying the bill at the cashier, Mary finds she has been charged the same for her hot water as John was for his tea. She demands, and gets, a tea bag to take home with her."

Well, she paid for tea and didn't get a tea bag, so I don't think this is cheapskate behavior.  I understand this sort of "it's the principle of the thing" reaction.

Virg

Well, no, she paid for her hot water, which happened to be the same price as the tea. It's like if I order a slice of cheese pizza and my friend orders pepperoni. Do I get to ask for "my" pepperoni after the fact just because the slices are the same price?

Unless she specifically asked "Is there a charge for hot water?" and was told no, she had no reason to assume it would be free.

Ah, gotcha. I was thinking they charged her for tea under the assumption that she was going to dunk her husband's tea bag in her water (but that the water would have been free if they hadn't made that assumption).

I guess what got me about this is, we are talking about an item that you can replace for what, 3 cents or so? And she made someone go back and get her one, when she probably has a box of them at home.

I am all for "the principle of the thing"and even I wouldn't ask for the tea bag. And I am one cheap lady...

I am surprised no one has brought up a "make your own lemonade" scenario at a restaurant, involving free water, free sweetener, and a slice of lemon.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2013, 05:46:17 PM by Barb3000 »

weeblewobble

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #262 on: April 02, 2013, 05:58:10 PM »
Apparently, converting hot water and ketchup into tomato soup is another trick.  ???

Hillia

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #263 on: April 02, 2013, 06:05:58 PM »
Apparently, converting hot water and ketchup into tomato soup is another trick.  ???

I've heard that called 'Depression soup' because it supposedly started back then.

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MissRose

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #264 on: April 02, 2013, 06:23:27 PM »
My mother, where can I start with her:

*I like going to yard sales, but step far from her when she negotiates on prices that she does a good amount of the time.  I rarely negotiate at yard sales.

*When I was 12 at the Land of the Mouse, I had to say I was 10 due the cost of the tickets if I was asked.  Good thing I looked young to pull it off but I hated doing that.

*The County Fair had a special for under 17s was a very cheap admission day when I was about 9 and my sister 6 so my mother took each of kids by the hand, and turned her wedding rings the other way, and my mother being looking young enough said I am the kids' sitter, and she got away with it!

*She doesn't tip waitstaff well.  Case in point, we had a discount voucher to a place while on vacation with her, and my sister's 2 kids to the land of the Mouse.  She was going to tip on what we actually paid for, even though the 4 people split 2 large meals, 1 of them that was free.  I ensured the waitstaff got the proper tip even though she objected (and my dad had given me cash to tip with ahead of time knowing his own wife doesn't tip well lol)

*She usually keeps her home cooler than normal in winter regarding the heat and warmer in the summer (not running much a/c), and tries to tell other family members we saved X amount doing it that way.  I have to adjust how I dress when going over there. 

I need to return later with more as I know she is one that even if she is given a few extra dollars and spend it on something fun, she won't really do it unless really pushed to do so....





« Last Edit: April 02, 2013, 06:30:37 PM by MissRose »

Shalamar

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #265 on: April 02, 2013, 06:56:06 PM »
My dad haggles at garage sales too, but he haggles UP.   As in:  "you're only asking $1 for that?   C'mon, it's worth at least $5, and I refuse to pay a penny less!"   People think he's quite mad.   :)

Susiqzer

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #266 on: April 02, 2013, 07:08:01 PM »
Heartmug, that is ... beyond weird. At least it sounds like you can laugh at it.


Quote
running out in a rainstorm with a bucket and a bar of soap to wash the car - cheap.

Cheap is mean spirited, taking advantage, using most people's good manners to get away with something outrageous because you know that no one will challenge you.

I disagree and would call this smart--and fun! It's not mean-spirited, it's just taking advantage of a good thing.

I need to chime in on this one, because it truly is fun!

When I was a kid, my parents had little spare money and a really bad well. There was no way we could wash the car, if not for a good rainstorm.

But one of my fondest memories will always be goofing off in the rain with my normally stoic mother, laughing like nuts and washing the car!

kckgirl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #267 on: April 02, 2013, 07:12:11 PM »
Quote
running out in a rainstorm with a bucket and a bar of soap to wash the car - cheap.

Not cheap at all, especially if water restrictions are in place with steep fines for washing cars and watering lawns. When I did it, I told my kids they couldn't fine me for using water that fell from the sky.
Maryland

reflection5

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #268 on: April 02, 2013, 07:18:23 PM »
@ Coralreef
Quote
Snipping leaves or branches from plants instead of buying them.  She would replant/soak them so they would grow roots.

I will overlook this one because I do it all the time!!   :D  Got most of my hanging plants this way.  But, I snip, root, and replant my own (I don't snip/pinch other people's plants.  My grandma used to do that).

@ Library Dragon

Quote
They wouldn't let ILs stay in the Florida house because "they wouldn't feel right charging them rent."   
??? ::) ::)

The "logic" boggles the mind.  How insulting. 
« Last Edit: April 02, 2013, 07:35:44 PM by reflection5 »

NyaChan

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #269 on: April 02, 2013, 07:48:21 PM »
@ Coralreef
Quote
Snipping leaves or branches from plants instead of buying them.  She would replant/soak them so they would grow roots.

I will overlook this one because I do it all the time!!   :D  Got most of my hanging plants this way.  But, I snip, root, and replant my own (I don't snip/pinch other people's plants.  My grandma used to do that).

@ Library Dragon

Quote
They wouldn't let ILs stay in the Florida house because "they wouldn't feel right charging them rent."   
??? ::) ::)

The "logic" boggles the mind.  How insulting.

Ah but dontcha know, that was giving the ILs the perfect opportunity to say, "Oh no, we don't mind paying rent - what's your going rate?"