Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 221807 times)

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MommyPenguin

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #450 on: April 08, 2013, 05:29:41 PM »
Well the reason the stacking perplexed me is because while I was shopping at Weis the only store coupons I got were for Weis brands.  The ones that were printed up at the register were labeled as manufacturer coupons.  So I wasn't sure how people were able to stack store coupons with mfr. coupons when the mfr. coupons were for name brands and the Weis store coupons were for just the store brands.

I wonder if the coupons printed at the register are considered store coupons even if they say manufacturer coupons on them?

I have store cards for both Weis and Martin's, so the club savings is also beneficial.  I like Martin's circulars though since they have worthwhile coupons and not just the pharmacy coupons every week which doesn't always do us much good since I get mine at Target.

This is my main issue with couponing.  The store brand is cheaper than the name brands even with coupons, so what's the point?  It might be different at another store that doesn't have good store brands of everything.  Also, the store (Meijer) often prints out coupons with your receipt for things like $2 off your next bread purchase of $15 or more! (good for anything in the bread aisle), which are awesome.  I love those.  Meijer does it for dairy products, bread products, frozen foods, produce, and a few others.  No problems spending $15 in any of those aisles here!  I love it.

With the spending more for quality, I also agree that the opposite is often true.  I'm perfectly happy buying certain kids' clothes, particularly, in cheap fabrics, because expensive clothing doesn't seem any better against stains or certain kinds of wear.  Some items of clothing it does make a difference, admittedly, but it depends on the kind of clothing.  I buy the cheapest sweater tights that I can because those things wear through no matter what (probably comes from having very active little girls who like to climb and play rough but also wear skirts with sweater tights all winter).  They're practically a consumable item around here and rarely get handed down to the next kid.  However, I have found that for schoolbooks, new is often better, as the books need to survive through 4 kids and they take a lot of love and wear!

Tai

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #451 on: April 08, 2013, 06:06:53 PM »
I'm one of the people that will go to various stores to get the sales.  The difference is, that I make it on the way to or from something else, and almost all of the stores we go to are for a specific item.  For example, Aldi is about 5 minutes from DH's work, so the days I pick him up after work are the days we shop there.  We usually make it to Aldi once every week-week and a half for bread, produce, eggs, snacks, Sam's once a week for samples (lol), milk, and rotisserie chicken, Price Rite every couple of weeks for meat and produce, Trader Joe's for convenience foods and work lunch stuff, etc. 

It works out that we never have a grocery bill more than $30-40, and rarely more than one trip out to the van to bring it all in.  Everything is also grouped with other trips, like at Sam's we'll fill the gas tank and Price Rite is next to the pharmacy. 


Jones

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #452 on: April 08, 2013, 06:36:25 PM »
I have been unsuccessful so far in attempting to stack coupons. All the stores in my area have a one-coupon-per-item rule; one store accepts manufacturer coupons but doesn't put out any of their own. Tragic.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #453 on: April 08, 2013, 06:38:45 PM »
I have three major grocery stores all on the same strip.  I usually peruse the flyers every week, writing down everything on sale that I might be interested in.  Then I write my grocery list.  I go to the store that covers off the most items on my grocery list.  If a particular sale is really good at another store, I might hit a second store.  I hit Costco for staples about once every three months.

I'm due - I'm out of rice and kitty litter.

I'm not able to stack coupons here in Canada.  They don't allow it.  Plus, the only coupons I tend to get are for packaged foods that I just don't buy anymore.
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VorFemme

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #454 on: April 08, 2013, 07:03:27 PM »
The irony is that the boots theory works both ways.  To give my real-life example which actually involves boots, I always wear "hiking boots" for footwear because I like the way they work for me.  I put that in quotes because there are $25.00 cheapies and $500.00 extreme-o boots, and since I wear them all the time they wear out a lot faster than hiking boots normally do.  The thing is, I figured out that a good set of boots lasts 3-4 times as long as the cheapies, so it would seem that they would be the better investment.  But the problem is that the good boots that last that long are $150.00, so they'd have to last six times as long to be worth it, and the big plus is that I always have a reasonably new backup pair of boots.

This is only one example, but there are plenty of situations where the extra quality doesn't justify the extra cost, so it pays to consider the balance in all things.

Virg

I make that argument about bras - you can go through a lot of $8 K-mart Specials before you approach the price of a $60 good one - and the good ones can get ruined in the dryer just as easily.  I'd rather have cheap ones I don't have to take such good care of  :P  (Of course, that's all moot if you're a hard-to-find size . . . then you buy what fits and wear it forever!)

Which is why my engineered 40DDD bras never see the inside of a dryer.  Heat kills the elastic - drip drying easily doubles the life span of your bra.

Mom wears a 34B.  Her bras go through the dryer - partly because Dad is "helping" do the laundry and Dad does not understand drip drying.....forty-two years ago, he didn't understand "Dry Clean Only" either, but I say that only to make the point that Dad never has learned to read care labels to this day.

We're lucky - his mother used to have to boil clothes clean and run them through a wringer before hanging them on a clothes line.  He has learned to use the washer & dryer with hot, warm, and cold water - as well as a low heat on the dryer instead of EVERTHING going in on "High heat".  He has learned something since he first helped his mother with laundry in the forties (before his baby sister was old enough to do chores).
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siamesecat2965

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #455 on: April 08, 2013, 07:13:27 PM »
I have three major grocery stores all on the same strip.  I usually peruse the flyers every week, writing down everything on sale that I might be interested in.  Then I write my grocery list.  I go to the store that covers off the most items on my grocery list.  If a particular sale is really good at another store, I might hit a second store.  I hit Costco for staples about once every three months.

I'm due - I'm out of rice and kitty litter.

I'm not able to stack coupons here in Canada.  They don't allow it.  Plus, the only coupons I tend to get are for packaged foods that I just don't buy anymore.

I'm lucky in that I have a plethora of grocery and other stores in my general area. I shop at whichever one I'm near when I'm out and about. 4.5 miles from me is a target where I buy a lot of groceries, Costco and supermarket. Trader Joes is closer to my office in the other direction from home so I don't get there as often as I'd like. they are, however, breaking ground on a new shopping center in a matter of weeks, which will have a TJ, and if not for the lack of sidewalks, i could walk to it!  so I normally don't have to run around like crazy to get the best deals.

ladyknight1

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #456 on: April 08, 2013, 07:54:35 PM »

The irony is that the boots theory works both ways.  To give my real-life example which actually involves boots, I always wear "hiking boots" for footwear because I like the way they work for me.  I put that in quotes because there are $25.00 cheapies and $500.00 extreme-o boots, and since I wear them all the time they wear out a lot faster than hiking boots normally do.  The thing is, I figured out that a good set of boots lasts 3-4 times as long as the cheapies, so it would seem that they would be the better investment.  But the problem is that the good boots that last that long are $150.00, so they'd have to last six times as long to be worth it, and the big plus is that I always have a reasonably new backup pair of boots.

This is only one example, but there are plenty of situations where the extra quality doesn't justify the extra cost, so it pays to consider the balance in all things.

Virg


I have an $85 pair of Teva sandals that I've worn almost daily for 13 years. I had to replace the Velcro at one point, but the soles are barely worn.

Me too! They were my mother's day gift to myself three years ago. I love them.

Slartibartfast

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #457 on: April 08, 2013, 08:16:30 PM »
This is my main issue with couponing.  The store brand is cheaper than the name brands even with coupons, so what's the point?  It might be different at another store that doesn't have good store brands of everything. 

This is not universally true - generic is usually cheaper if you don't have a coupon, but I'd say a good 75% of the time, regular price brand name plus a run-of-the-mill coupon makes it the same price or cheaper than the generic.  If you can stack the coupon and a sale, there's really no comparison.  (There are still things I actually prefer the Publix brand, though!)

MommyPenguin

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #458 on: April 08, 2013, 08:26:38 PM »
This is my main issue with couponing.  The store brand is cheaper than the name brands even with coupons, so what's the point?  It might be different at another store that doesn't have good store brands of everything. 

This is not universally true - generic is usually cheaper if you don't have a coupon, but I'd say a good 75% of the time, regular price brand name plus a run-of-the-mill coupon makes it the same price or cheaper than the generic.  If you can stack the coupon and a sale, there's really no comparison.  (There are still things I actually prefer the Publix brand, though!)

Oh, I realize that, but I was speaking specifically... so many times I would be there with my coupon looking at the price, and it just didn't work out.  *Maybe* when the item was on sale, but I never seemed to run into sales during the life of the coupon, anyway.  And with only one coupon per item, the time I was spending on clipping coupons and trying to time them to sales just wasn't end up working out, as the coupons were rarely on stuff I would have bought anyway and never on the stuff that I spend a *lot* of money on (our biggest expenses are produce, dairy (especially yogurt, but store brand is cheaper than name brand even when I have a name brand coupon, and store brand is even on sale a lot, bread, and sometimes meat.  It was a bit easier when we had a chest freezer, as I could buy stuff when there was a good coupon/sale matchup, but as it is, I need stuff when I need it, a lot of the stuff needs refrigeration or freezing (lack of space) or doesn't last.  I can't buy enough yogurts when they're on sale to last us until the next sale because I don't have the storage space, etc.  I even tried making yogurt at home, but the kids wouldn't eat it.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #459 on: April 08, 2013, 08:39:59 PM »
I would love if Thomas would put out coupons for their bagels.  DH likes bagels in the morning because they're a quick and easy thing to grab and eat while driving.  And I've tried getting the store brand before but he said they were tough and tasted stale.   But Thomas bagels are about $5 a bag and seldom on sale. 
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ladyknight1

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #460 on: April 08, 2013, 09:03:16 PM »
They have Thomas bagels and bagel thins at Sam's club, where 2 packages are under $4.

Minmom3

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #461 on: April 08, 2013, 09:55:33 PM »
I used to buy a $15-20 purse at one of the discount stores 3-4 times a year. I then realized these purses weren't made well and I was tired of repairing or discarding them. I now buy one or two well made purses a year for $30-40 and they last. I just change them out if I get bored. Same with shoes, if they aren't made well then they aren't worth a dollar, if you have to keep replacing them.

My current purse is a beautiful, heavy and soft leather item that cost me $120.  My most expensive bag ever...  It's now 3 years old, and that's young for me and my leather bags.  Most of them get used for 10+ years.  I had a nice pair of good leather flats that were $105 new.  I wore them for 12 years.  I resoled them 5 times, and re heeled them another 3 or so on top of that.  I probably spent another $100 over the years, spiffing them up.  But, $200 over 10 years, with no problems caused by ill fitting shoes, breaks down to $20 a year - and I have NEVER had a $20 pair of shoes that fit me or would last more than a few months.  There are quite a few things that are expensive up front, but will pay for themselves many times over in length of use time. 
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Minmom3

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #462 on: April 08, 2013, 10:02:01 PM »
The irony is that the boots theory works both ways.  To give my real-life example which actually involves boots, I always wear "hiking boots" for footwear because I like the way they work for me.  I put that in quotes because there are $25.00 cheapies and $500.00 extreme-o boots, and since I wear them all the time they wear out a lot faster than hiking boots normally do.  The thing is, I figured out that a good set of boots lasts 3-4 times as long as the cheapies, so it would seem that they would be the better investment.  But the problem is that the good boots that last that long are $150.00, so they'd have to last six times as long to be worth it, and the big plus is that I always have a reasonably new backup pair of boots.

This is only one example, but there are plenty of situations where the extra quality doesn't justify the extra cost, so it pays to consider the balance in all things.

Virg

I make that argument about bras - you can go through a lot of $8 K-mart Specials before you approach the price of a $60 good one - and the good ones can get ruined in the dryer just as easily.  I'd rather have cheap ones I don't have to take such good care of  :P  (Of course, that's all moot if you're a hard-to-find size . . . then you buy what fits and wear it forever!)

They also last a LOT longer if they don't go through the dryer at all.  I wash mine in a lingerie bag, so they no longer get twisted and mangled, and then they line dry (on a rack in winter, outdoors in summer) and they last years longer than they used to...  And I'm large; I call my bras War Bras, because they aren't small and dainty, and they have all KINDS of buttressing!   ;D
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EveLGenius

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #463 on: April 08, 2013, 11:07:55 PM »
My uncle was one of those people who was penny wise and pound foolish.  He would buy ANYTHING, if it were on sale, whether he needed it or not.  I think he's the reason grocery stores started posting "Limit 3" signs, and he was the guy who'd buy 3, take them to the car, and come back for another 3 of whatever they were.  At one time, we cousins counted over 80 cases of pop (at this time, a case was 8 glass bottles) in his basement.  Equally, if a thing was not on sale, it was almost impossible to convince him to buy it.  Fortunately, underwear and dish soap do occasionally go on sale.  He took his dates to the hospital cafeteria, because the food was cheaper there than any other restaurant in town.

But the best story about his cheapness is his gasoline story.  When he moved to Washington, DC, someone told him that the taxi drivers knew where the cheapest gas was.  So one Saturday soon after he moved, he picked a cab at random and started following it.  He followed that cab all day long, and sure enough, in the late afternoon, the cab headed down a small residential street and suddenly turned down one of those driveways that leads to an underground garage.  Uncle followed, and sure enough, there was the cabbie getting gas.  Uncle pulled up to the pump, and even though he had no cab license and very obviously was in a private car, the guy pumping gas (this was in the early 60s) filled his tank and took his money.  It definitely wasn't a public gas station- from the description, it might even have been black market.  But for as long as he lived in DC, that's where Uncle got his gas, at lower prices than anywhere else in town.

I have no idea how much money he saved on gas, or how much he spent following a cab around all day.  I don't know how he didn't get beat up by a cabbie who didn't want to be followed.  I'm just glad that when he left DC, he moved to a very rural town, where all of the gas stations were clearly marked.

magician5

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #464 on: April 08, 2013, 11:24:56 PM »
Generally, we don't eat processed food and the last time I checked a newspaper for coupons, they still weren't giving coupons for things like meat, cheese, produce or milk. These things go on sale or they don't and I try to plan menus around what's on sale, if I can.

Precisely. I almost never find any national "big-name brands" that are worth the higher price over generics, even with coupons. And I'm never thrilled with "10 cents off" a product that costs a dollar more.
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