Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 214139 times)

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Shalamar

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #570 on: April 16, 2013, 01:43:52 PM »
Well, you know how they say that one man's junk is another man's treasure, but I'd definitely draw the line at taking a pee-stained couch - free or not!

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The father stopped him and grabbed all the strangers' plates that still had food on them and emptied the food into his to-go boxes.

EWWWW!  :o

siamesecat2965

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #571 on: April 16, 2013, 02:26:57 PM »
My sister and I went to a Japanese steakhouse. We sat at a mostly empty teppanyaki table across from a full one. The people at the full one appeared to be mostly a family (parents, three children) and two couples who appeared to be strangers. After dinner, the waiter was collecting the plates. He picked up the strangers' plates and moved down to collect the families'. The father stopped him and grabbed all the strangers' plates that still had food on them and emptied the food into his to-go boxes.

Our town has an annual junk day where you can throw out just about anything you want. People troll the neighborhoods looking for "good" junk to take. We had an old couch in our basement. It was hideous (we got it from his parents) and our cat had decided to pee on it many, many times. DH bagged the gross couch cushions and hauled the couch to the curb. Less than an hour later, it was gone. Did I mention it was August, and in the 90s?

We drove around later that night trying to see if whoever took it had thrown it back out again, but we never did. So someone possibly decided it was worth it to keep a pee-stained couch because it was free. Yeesh.

Ewww to the first one

And the second one reminds me of a VW commercial from a while back. Two guys are driving in a VW, and spy a chair on the side of the road. They stop, and next thing you see them driving again, with the chair in the back. They look at each other and sniff. Car stops again, then pans back to them driving away, sans car, and see the chair once again on the side of the road.

Thipu1

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #572 on: April 16, 2013, 02:35:10 PM »
When I lived in Manhattan in the 1970s, Thursday evenings were the times when big stuff went out on the curb to be picked up by the DSNY.  I would never take anything upholstered but would consider things that could easily be washed or cleaned up.  I got a nice table that way, some decent dishes, and pair of lamps that only needed a simple rewiring to be perfectly functional.

On Thursday evenings half the people I knew would be doing a bit of urban picking.  Toward the end of the month, when people would be cleaning out apartments and preparing to move, the lode was particularly rich. 

We weren't cheap.  We were thrifty and, if you had a use for something that was being thrown away, it was almost considered a crime not to take it. 

Sometimes, we'd make deals with each other.  'If you help me get this up the stairs to the third floor, I'll treat you to a drink at the Red Blazer'.  You could meet some interesting potential dates on
Thursday evenings. 

ladyknight1

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #573 on: April 16, 2013, 02:51:47 PM »
DH & I are also urban pickers. Our living room table, our vacuums, some beautiful crystal serve ware, all picked.

Redwing

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #574 on: April 16, 2013, 02:58:14 PM »
If you live in a big university town, you could probably furnish your whole house with cast-offs at the end of the year.

SiotehCat

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #575 on: April 16, 2013, 03:01:37 PM »
Last year, I had to go to New York and move my brother out of his apartment.

In the basement of his apartment building, the building super had a really cool set up. There were book cases with tons of books, an area for furniture, an area for clothes, etc... You could leave what you wanted and you could take what you wanted.

If not for my DH, I think I would be a hoarder. I wanted to take everything in that basement with me. DH didn't let me take anything.

Im not sure if I can be considered cheap, but I like to think I am thrifty. Most of my clothes was bought at the Goodwill or on serious clearance. I just can't bring myself to pay full price.

Shalamar

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #576 on: April 16, 2013, 03:41:32 PM »
Over the last few years, I've developed the hobby of picking up any beer can or beer bottle I see (even if they're dirty).  I get ten cents per can/bottle, and it's amazing how quickly the money adds up.  We must live in a neighborhood full of slobs, because we've managed to buy a very nice couch with our "free money".

That's cheapskate story part 1.  Part 2 is when I crowed about all the money we had in our beer fund, and how we were going to use it to buy a couch.  Someone on another forum said "Why don't you buy a used couch from Craigslist and pocket the difference?"  Same reason that another poster already mentioned - I do NOT take someone else's upholstered furniture.  You never know what grossness it's been subjected to!

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #577 on: April 16, 2013, 03:49:39 PM »
Over the last few years, I've developed the hobby of picking up any beer can or beer bottle I see (even if they're dirty).  I get ten cents per can/bottle, and it's amazing how quickly the money adds up.  We must live in a neighborhood full of slobs, because we've managed to buy a very nice couch with our "free money".


I wish we could do that in this state!  We used to do that for easy quick money when we were a young, newly married couple and living in CA, but now we're in Maryland, we can't as much. 

On the other hand, DH would save up coated copper wires, strip the coating off them, and once we took that and an old washer that was in the house before we moved but wasn't working down to this place in Frederick that would pay you per pound I think for any recyclable metal.  We got a good amount off that washer!
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Elfmama

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #578 on: April 16, 2013, 03:58:23 PM »
Well, you know how they say that one man's junk is another man's treasure, but I'd definitely draw the line at taking a pee-stained couch - free or not!

Quote
The father stopped him and grabbed all the strangers' plates that still had food on them and emptied the food into his to-go boxes.

EWWWW!  :o
Toss the cushions, strip it down to the frame, and reupholster it.  Pee smell goes away with the cushions and other padding. 
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dawbs

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #579 on: April 16, 2013, 04:01:19 PM »
Over the last few years, I've developed the hobby of picking up any beer can or beer bottle I see (even if they're dirty).  I get ten cents per can/bottle, and it's amazing how quickly the money adds up.  We must live in a neighborhood full of slobs, because we've managed to buy a very nice couch with our "free money".


The pop cans from my work stash (I go through a case every month or 2, so not a lot) live in a plastic grocery bag in my car's back seat.
When I'm asked for money on the street or I see someone collecting, I don't always want to open my wallet (for a variety of reasons), but asking if they would like $1 worth of cans generally is positive all around.

mumma to KMC

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #580 on: April 16, 2013, 04:03:50 PM »

BUT I think that some of DH's family is worse.

MIL in particular is obsessed with plastic take away cups. Not the thick, reasonably you could use this a few times kind, but the cheap clear plastic ones and even the paper ones. Woe on the person who tries to throw away a solo cup.

I think we share the same MIL. My MIL and FIL were visiting last week and when they come to visit, they bring food. Lots of it, nothing I'd ever want to eat (esp when it's been in their van for two days travelling from a cold state to a warm state and shrimp is involved w/o ice.) Anyway....some of the leftovers they brought (because MIL cleans out her fridge to travel) were in cottage and ricotta cheese containers. Those containers were on the counter when it came time to do dishes and I asked my FIL if I should toss them out or would they be making the return trip. He said to toss. I did. Ten minutes later, she asked where they were. I left the kitchen to avoid the disapproving look.

They stopped at MickyD's for coffee on the way down and used those cups to drink coffee out of the entire time they were here. I knew not to toss them from previous visits when my MIL got upset that I served coffee in real mugs. :)

When my dd #1 was baptized, dh and I decided that we would go the paper plate and plasticware route for the baptism party, to save us time and a bit of energy, so we could enjoy our guests and so we wouldn't have to worry too much about clean up at the end of the day. Well my MIL went around collecting all of the plasticware and put it in my sink so I could wash it. (after we said to just toss) To be honest, I already felt bad about using them as it was and thought well, they are all here, I should just wash them. Then I came to my senses and tossed them.

Earlier in the thread someone talked of saving the nice plastic containers that come with take out these days. I love those, great for left overs and for dh's lunch!

MommyPenguin

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #581 on: April 16, 2013, 04:12:59 PM »
On the other hand, DH would save up coated copper wires, strip the coating off them, and once we took that and an old washer that was in the house before we moved but wasn't working down to this place in Frederick that would pay you per pound I think for any recyclable metal.  We got a good amount off that washer!

We've done that!  What drove my husband crazy a few weeks ago was when he discovered that somebody had gone up to the house we'd just bought and torn the copper pipes off the compressor.  The value of the amount of copper they stole?  Probably about $2.  The cost of fixing the damage they made ripping it out?  Several hundred.

Carotte

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #582 on: April 16, 2013, 04:19:43 PM »
DH & I are also urban pickers. Our living room table, our vacuums, some beautiful crystal serve ware, all picked.

I started reading that you were a urban pickler, didn't bat an eye at that, but wondered quite fast how you could pickle a table, vacuums or dinnerware...

When we got rid of a set of a storage unit I taped the legs (removable) with the rest of the shelves. It was in pretty good condition, I just hated it in my room.

My father got the building manager to allow a table under the main staires that is used for magazine/book drop-off. You can drop the ones you don't like and take anything left before you. There used to be more stuff on it and now there's only a few magazines but I still think it was a go idea.

Wulfie

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #583 on: April 16, 2013, 04:30:23 PM »
please be REALLY carefull with trading things around apartments. That is the leading cause of Bedbugs being transfered!  We eliminated the "free" tables from most apartment complexes that our company owns/runs.  Make  sure you know what to look for with Bedbugs and whenever possible either toss it in the dryer on HIGH for at least 15 minutes or freeze it in the freezer for at least 48 hours.

Micah

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #584 on: April 16, 2013, 06:03:42 PM »
Regarding free things.....

When I was a child we went away for six months, leaving the house in the care of a family who we were friends with at the time. When we got back, the house was trashed and INFESTED with fleas. No kidding, when you walked into a room a black wave of fleas would come towards you. In the office we had a mat made of straw type material. It looked like a woven hay bale. We flea bombed the rest of the house, but that mat was contaminated by the chemicals and STILL infested with fleas, so Dad thew it out. As we were leaving the dump we saw someone roll it up and put it in his car...... :o
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