News: IT'S THE 2ND ANNUAL GUATEMALA LIBRARY PROJECT BOOK DRIVE!    LOOKING FOR DONATIONS OF SCIENCE BOOKS THIS YEAR.    Check it out in the "Extending the Hand of Kindness" folder or here: http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=139832.msg3372084#msg3372084   

  • October 22, 2017, 12:51:42 PM

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 528698 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

baglady

  • Member
  • Posts: 5061
  • A big lass and a bonny lass and she loves her beer
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #630 on: April 17, 2013, 11:58:33 PM »
Quote
If you don't need a widget that normally costs $1000, but you buy it because it's 70% off, you haven't saved $700 -- you've spent $300 for a totally useless widget!

Amy Dacyczyn of "Tightwad Gazette" fame offered this handy tip: "Want to save $100,000 this year? Don't buy a Rolls-Royce."
My photography is on Redbubble! Come see: http://www.redbubble.com/people/baglady

Thipu1

  • Member
  • Posts: 7439
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #631 on: April 18, 2013, 10:21:40 AM »
This is a small one that happened when Mr. Thipu and I moved into our current home. 

All the big stuff was taken from our two apartments.  However, he had some delicate electronics he didn't trust to the movers.  His parents came over in the evening to finish the move and his mother decided to look in his old refrigerator. 

There were a few bits of food left there including a wilted head of lettuce and a jar of raspberry jam with about a quarter inch of product left in the bottom. MIL  packed these up.  They weren't thrown away. 

When we arrived at our apartment, MIL put the lettuce and the jam in our new refrigerator because these remnants would be, 'Pennies from Heaven'. 

The next morning, they went out with the moving trash. 

snowflake

  • Member
  • Posts: 1482
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #632 on: April 18, 2013, 11:03:03 AM »
Not sure if I shared this before, but the couch reminded me of one more. 

I was once poor and starting out.  I had moved into an apartment and had no couch and was keeping an eye on the local Goodwill to see if I could pick up something worn but serviceable.

I had some friends who lived in a rental house.  This rental house had been passed down through a few rounds of roommates and in the process the garage and backyard had been filled up with stuff of roommates past.

One of these friends found out that I was perusing Goodwill for a couch and offered one to me free.  Said couch had been sitting out in the backyard, exposed to elements for over a year.  I was currently living in a climate that included lots of rain and some snow.  So the couch was understandably coming apart at the seams.  It wasn't a well-made couch to begin with and it was literally disintegrating.  So I said "No thank you."

There then followed several weeks of badgering me to take the couch.  The "benefactor" kept explaining that it was an easy matter to have the couch reupholstered.  I pointed out that the frame was in terrible shape and he insisted that it could be rebuilt too.  Wait! I'm in the market for a $50 couch and you are telling me, "No problem!  Just bring this to a hand artisan and have it rebuilt?"  UM NO!  Further more, any kind of careful repair would be much more expensive than the couch itself.  It was likely a $200 couch at the most originally.

I finally bought a couch that was worn but workable for the grand bargain of $40.  I was very pleased with myself but the person kept going on and on and on about how I really should have saved myself the money by repairing their junker couch. 

I found out later that their landlord had given them an ultimatum to clean up the place.  He and his roommates had been bringing stuff to the dump/Goodwill one car load at the time, but couldn't get rid of the couch that way.  They didn't want to spring the $30 or so that it would require to hire a pickup to move the couch.  So instead they were hoping that I'd spend hundreds of dollars to rescue and rehabilitate that couch.

Wow, with friends like those, who needs credit card companies?

MerryCat

  • Member
  • Posts: 1570
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #633 on: April 18, 2013, 12:29:02 PM »
It's weird how a lot of people pushing old junk on you to "save money" end up costing you more if you take them up on your offer. Relatedly, I'm often surprised by how many cheap people end up spending more by being cheap than they would have otherwise.

I think that the two things that distinguish cheap from thrifty are that (1) for cheap people the feeling of getting a deal is more important than actual savings and (2) while thrity people will do with less for themselves, cheap people are all about what they can make others do without to save themselves money.

siamesecat2965

  • Member
  • Posts: 9056
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #634 on: April 18, 2013, 01:59:42 PM »
It's weird how a lot of people pushing old junk on you to "save money" end up costing you more if you take them up on your offer. Relatedly, I'm often surprised by how many cheap people end up spending more by being cheap than they would have otherwise.

I think that the two things that distinguish cheap from thrifty are that (1) for cheap people the feeling of getting a deal is more important than actual savings and (2) while thrity people will do with less for themselves, cheap people are all about what they can make others do without to save themselves money.

And for the cheapskates out there, they simply can't fathom that sometimes you NEED to spend a little more to get something that will work or last.  Or something you can't do yourself. I have friends who are appalled that I will actually spend money to have someone put highlights in my hair. In their mind, i shoudl be able to do it myself and save money! So not happening. not unless i want to look like a zebra!

Slartibartfast

  • Member
  • Posts: 10770
    • Nerdy Necklaces - my Etsy shop!
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #635 on: April 18, 2013, 02:11:29 PM »
Ooh, another one about my FIL:

In the process of renovating all these rental properties FIL has, he ends up filling his trunk with stuff.  The theory is that he might as well haul this stack of two dozen paving stones and three sheets of drywall and two used toilets and who knows what else around, because what if he takes out a mostly-functional toilet from one house and throws it away but then needs to replace a toilet that was in even worse shape at another house?  By keeping used junk in his truck, he won't have to buy new things!

Of course, the extra weight in his truck means extra gas, which probably negates any savings he may receive.  And - in the case of the used toilets, which rode around in his truck for at least two years before he finally got rid of them - they made more work for other people: FIL works at a secure government facility, which means all vehicles have to be inspected every time they come in or out.  Which means some poor security guard had to inspect the same two used toilets for TWO WHOLE YEARS (in addition to the daily construction detritus FIL carries around anyway).

siamesecat2965

  • Member
  • Posts: 9056
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #636 on: April 18, 2013, 02:47:41 PM »
Ooh, another one about my FIL:

In the process of renovating all these rental properties FIL has, he ends up filling his trunk with stuff.  The theory is that he might as well haul this stack of two dozen paving stones and three sheets of drywall and two used toilets and who knows what else around, because what if he takes out a mostly-functional toilet from one house and throws it away but then needs to replace a toilet that was in even worse shape at another house?  By keeping used junk in his truck, he won't have to buy new things!

Of course, the extra weight in his truck means extra gas, which probably negates any savings he may receive.  And - in the case of the used toilets, which rode around in his truck for at least two years before he finally got rid of them - they made more work for other people: FIL works at a secure government facility, which means all vehicles have to be inspected every time they come in or out.  Which means some poor security guard had to inspect the same two used toilets for TWO WHOLE YEARS (in addition to the daily construction detritus FIL carries around anyway).

He sounds like my former landlord! Who was cheaper than cheap. Mind you, he owns two rental houses, and lives in a nice home himself, but he refuses to spend ANY money on maintaining or fixing properly, anything in either house. And when something did need to be fixed, he took a ďwait and see and maybe I can fix itĒ approach.  The one I was in had 4 apts. Mine was on the 3rd floor and had central a/c, in the attic above me.  One day, during a torrential thunderstorm, water began to POUR down my LR wall from the attic. I called him, and he said oh, its just a small leak, Iíll be over sometime.  I said NO, its pouring down you need to come NOW. so he does and its something simple with the a/c unit. Apparently it sits in a pain, with a drain, and somehow the drain had gotten clogged, so the water went everywhere. He then tried to blame it on the guys who had fixed my heat NINE months prior. I donít think so.

The end result was he got up and did whatever to unclog it, but the water had damaged my apt and the one below me. It took him MONTHS to fix, and even then he did a half-a**ed job. 

The best one though was the wasps. I saw them in my apt, and called him. he found (donít know how) a nest under the siding. Now according to the exterminator we called, the best way to deal with these is put some type of powder that kills them around a hole you drill, and they carry it back to the nest and they all die. Cheapo landlord though called an ex. but I think he must have known him since they guy wasnít too interested. LL then drilled a hole, stuck a bug bomb in and let it rip. Scattering these wasps into the wall voids, and rendering my kitchen pretty much useless for a good 6 weeks. He refused to allow a pro to do the job as HE knew best. Shortly thereafter I moved out.

LLís former job was maintenance etc for various companies and he could do some things, but others no, yet he refused to pay anyone to do anything he couldnít do. It really was quite annoying.

Shalamar

  • Member
  • Posts: 300
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #637 on: April 18, 2013, 04:14:20 PM »
Quote
he refused to pay anyone to do anything he couldnít do

Sounds like my dad.  He's a very  handy guy, and there's a lot he CAN do, but if he finds himself flummoxed by a home repair job, he's convinced that no-one on this earth could fix it.

Case in point:  I visited my parents once and slept in their guest bedroom, which had an ensuite bathroom.  The toilet kept making this loud constant "water trickling" noise that kept me awake.  I mentioned it the next day, and Dad blew his top, yelling "I can't fix it!  I've tried everything!"  I said "Well, can't you call someone?  Because I can't sleep with that racket going on."   

WELL.  You would have thought that I'd spat on his mother.  He was SO insulted.  He didn't call anyone, of course, and I had a miserable visit because I got no sleep.  (I tried ear plugs, putting the pillow over my head - nothing helped.)

A year later, his mother visited and stayed in the same bedroom.  She had the same complaint that I did about the toilet's noise.  (Considering that she was going deaf, that gives you an idea about how loud it was.)  Then, all of a sudden it became a huge priority, and Dad called a plumber immediately.    Problem solved!   ::)

bloo

  • Member
  • Posts: 1244
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #638 on: April 18, 2013, 04:24:06 PM »
It's weird how a lot of people pushing old junk on you to "save money" end up costing you more if you take them up on your offer. Relatedly, I'm often surprised by how many cheap people end up spending more by being cheap than they would have otherwise.

I think that the two things that distinguish cheap from thrifty are that (1) for cheap people the feeling of getting a deal is more important than actual savings and (2) while thrity people will do with less for themselves, cheap people are all about what they can make others do without to save themselves money.

And for the cheapskates out there, they simply can't fathom that sometimes you NEED to spend a little more to get something that will work or last.  Or something you can't do yourself. I have friends who are appalled that I will actually spend money to have someone put highlights in my hair. In their mind, i shoudl be able to do it myself and save money! So not happening. not unless i want to look like a zebra!

Oh you are not kidding!

My DH has been wanting a motor for his boat but I kvetched at the idea of spending $5K. That's a lot of money for us. But it's a Honda.

So at the advice of his friend, Bob, whose property is littered with junk he's going to get around to fixing, DH bought Bob's sister's boyfriend's old motor for $200.

After pouring another $800 into it and still afraid it wasn't going to work, I finally hollered uncle at told DH to go to the local marine shop and buy the dingdangity motor.

Now DH knows 100% of the time that the motor is going to start.

And now everytime DH talks to Bob, Bob whines about what a waste of money that Honda is. Of course, the last time Bob was supposed to take DH out on Bob's boat, Bob's motor died and they had to troll back to shore.  :o

Elfmama

  • Member
  • Posts: 4595
  • Derailing threads since 2001!
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #639 on: April 18, 2013, 07:51:03 PM »
Quote
If you don't need a widget that normally costs $1000, but you buy it because it's 70% off, you haven't saved $700 -- you've spent $300 for a totally useless widget!

Amy Dacyczyn of "Tightwad Gazette" fame offered this handy tip: "Want to save $100,000 this year? Don't buy a Rolls-Royce."
Oddly enough, DH does not understand this form of math.  I want a quilting machine.  The one that I want, for the features that I want, runs about $5000.  I keep telling him "Look, I'm saving you money.  The top-of-the-line longarm is $18,000. If I get what I want, I've saved you $13,000!"  And he just does. not. get. it!  And so far, neither do I.  :(
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Common sense is not a gift, but a curse.  Because then
you have to deal with all the people who don't have it.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

alkira6

  • Member
  • Posts: 654
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #640 on: April 18, 2013, 08:41:44 PM »
What about the cheapos who push their trash onto you and then in the 1/100 times it turns out to be something nice or even great, they lose it.  One of my friends got some old games and such from an aunt. She had been pushing her to take them for years, so my friend finally took them and was going to trash them.  I came over and after a little googling and a couple of ebay auctions, she netted a little over $300 selling pieces from the torn up games to collectors who were missing pieces and selling a couple of games intact as hey were barely played with.  Aunt lost it when she found out.  This was in 1995 and my friend still hears about how she "ripped her poor aunt off".

Lindee

  • Member
  • Posts: 414
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #641 on: April 18, 2013, 09:47:15 PM »
Years ago when I was living in a furnished flat in London the landlord never did any repairs. He told me how the previous tenants had damaged the coffee table and other things so they didn't get their deposit back but the damage was never fixed. Funnily enough nor were the planned improvements to the lighting and stairs he promised when we were looking at it. I was younger then and didn't realise if it wasn't done by the time you moved into a flat it would never happen.  Later when rain started to come in the bathroom ceiling I realised I could actually see sky through the ceiling and the roof. His response was that it was a rain storm and roofs weren't meant to be storm proof. Well,  yes I thought they were. Further complaints were met with the excuse that he didn't have a long enough ladder. This was a four storey house in a nice part of London, I would have though protecting his investment would be a priority, but no. 

I moved out soon after and since I was leaving the country and didn't trust him to return my deposit even though the place was in better order than when we moved in (he"graciously" allowed us repaint and fix things at our own expense) I kept back the final rent payment as the bond covered it.  He then rented it out for a bigger rent, I often wondered what the new tenants felt when it next rained.

Letting a major asset fall to bits because you are too cheap to pay for the upkeep is not good management.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2013, 09:50:48 PM by Lindee »

reflection5

  • Member
  • Posts: 436
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #642 on: April 18, 2013, 10:12:24 PM »
Quote
Letting a major asset fall to bits because you are too cheap to pay for the upkeep is not good management.

No kidding.

Many landlords will only spend money to repair or replace something if and when they have to (i.e. when tenant puts rent money in escrow).  They don’t manage their money well, and they keep getting questionable tenants who only stay a short period of time.  Then the unit stays empty for months (empty apartments don’t earn any money).

Years ago I had a cheapskate landlord who, whenever I needed something fixed or replaced, whined about his cash flow problems.   ::)
« Last Edit: April 18, 2013, 10:24:06 PM by reflection5 »

mbbored

  • Member
  • Posts: 4882
    • Budget Grad Student
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #643 on: April 18, 2013, 10:17:24 PM »
A former roommate and I were fixing dinner for a group of friends, including one young woman who has obsessive compulsive disorder. Roommate was making her "signature" salad which involved sesame seeds. Except when she went to grab the jar, it was filled with moth larvae. She shrugged her shoulder and dumped them in anyways. Nothing I said could convince her to forget the salad that night.

When our friends showed up and she pulled out the salad, I said "Funny thing! We discovered moths in the sesame seeds and Roommie added them anyways!" Oddly enough, nobody wanted to eat the salad and my roommate sulked all night. Friend with OCD since then has never touched a single dish that Roommie prepared, and now that we no longer live together, will only meet her in public places. ("If she was willing to serve me bugs, how clean could her house be?")

Margo

  • Member
  • Posts: 2144
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #644 on: April 19, 2013, 05:43:10 AM »
When I was a student, we had a cheapskate landlord/agent. He/They also had a lot of relatives so when things *did* get done it was always by one of his brothers/sons/cousins, not by a professional. Quite a few of the relatives were recent immigrants and didn't speak much English, whcih made communicating what needed to be done difficult at times.

Some of the highlights:

- A leak from the bathroom, which meant that water came through the living room ceiling and down the wall every time the bath, shower or sink were used. There were 6 of us living in the house - the bathroom got a lot of use. The agents kept telling us we just needed to be more careful and not splash (er, no, this isn't a little splashing, the main down pipe seems to have sprung a leak. I eventually called and told them that I, personally, didn't care f the bathtub fell through the ceiling because they were too cheap to fix it, but that I would sue the pants off them it that happened and I was injured, or any of my property damaged, and that it would really be cheaper for them to fix it before that happened. The came and fixed it 3 days later.

- The house was broken in to. The burglars used a garden spade as a lever to breakthe back door lock off the door. The landlord took over a week to come to secure it (we put bolts on, ourselves, in the mean time) When they did come, rather than replacing the door or the lock, they tried to screw the splintered wood back into place. They ignored us when we explained that the lock needed to be replaced as the burglars had also stolen the keys to the door. (A week later the burglars returned. They couldn't get access because of the bolts which my housemates and I had fixed to the door)

- the landlords had agreed to have an extra power point put into the kitchen, as there was no socket to plug in a washer, and we pointed out that an extension cord running across the kitchen floor was not acceptable. the guy who came to do it had absolutely no clue. Fortunately some of us did, and managed to ensure he didn't get the 'earth' and 'live'  wires wrong way round, but we did end up with a wire which went up one wall, zig-zagged across the ceiling and went down another wall, as running the wire along the skirting would have meant using more wire..)

- We're pretty sure that the landlord was pretty cheap in other ways, too, as we often got bailiffs knocking on the door looking for him.

- the landlord didn't live in the city where the house was. they visited occasionally, and once turned up at the door wanting us to let them stay in the house for a few nights so they didn't have t use a hotel. they got quite shirty when we refused to let them into the house.

- When we moved house, they tried to withhold our security deposits on the basis that there was 'junk in the hall'. Yes, there was a small amount of junk mail which was delivered after we moved out, and before they could be bothered to inspect. Fortunately, I have a nasty suspicious mind and had taken date-stamped photos of every room immediately before returning the keys. I still wound up havingto go to the agent's office and sit there advising *every*single*person* person not to rent through them as they would not return deposits to get our money back. (they had failed to return it 3 months after we moved out. They specialised in student lets, and it was just before the start of term, when every student and their parents are looking for rental properties.  It took about 20 minutes before they discovered that actually, no, my cheque was't in the post, and yes, there was someone in the office who could sign it, and oh yes, I was correct about the amount and the fact that they didn't have any right to deduct anything. I can't help wondering how much money they made every year from the interest on all those deposits,not to mention keeping them / creaming off the top. ( I made them give me the cheques from my house-mates, which I then posted, too. I'm sure they ought not to have given them to me, but I'm pretty sure none of them would have got their money otherwise...)

I reported them to the University housing office. (it wasn't university housing, but the housing office kept details of private landlord and agencies and if asked, would tell students whether there had been complaints or problems with particular landlords / agencies )