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Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 624455 times)

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ladyknight1

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #675 on: April 24, 2013, 08:22:58 AM »
Not surprised by that, Gyburc. Is it a relief for him to be gone?
ďAll that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

snowflake

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #676 on: April 24, 2013, 02:10:21 PM »
Unless I'm broke and starving, I wouldn't spend that much time waiting for a small, easily acquired freebie.  I wonder if people think about how much it costs them in labor hours to wait for that "free" pancake.  I remember going to the annual Ghirardelli Square Chocolate Festival, and there was a super-long line to get a micro-mini of a chocolate martini sample that used either 4 or 8 tickets (I think the sample tickets were sold in a group of 12 or 15 so that was an "expensive" sample).  I figured it wasn't worth my time to wait that long for something so small; I'd rather pay full price for a regular size chocolate martini that I'd get within 5-10 minutes.

My parents have the motto that free is worth any amount of time and/or money.  I like to go to the grocery store during non-peak hours so I can be in and out quick.  My mom tells me that I'm wasting money because if I go when there are free samples, I can get a free lunch.  Besides the fact that it adds half an hour to the time, that also requires eating multiple samples instead of just one.  So I guess free is also worth any amount of shame.

Coralreef

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #677 on: April 24, 2013, 02:51:23 PM »
Unless I'm broke and starving, I wouldn't spend that much time waiting for a small, easily acquired freebie.  I wonder if people think about how much it costs them in labor hours to wait for that "free" pancake.  I remember going to the annual Ghirardelli Square Chocolate Festival, and there was a super-long line to get a micro-mini of a chocolate martini sample that used either 4 or 8 tickets (I think the sample tickets were sold in a group of 12 or 15 so that was an "expensive" sample).  I figured it wasn't worth my time to wait that long for something so small; I'd rather pay full price for a regular size chocolate martini that I'd get within 5-10 minutes.

My parents have the motto that free is worth any amount of time and/or money.  I like to go to the grocery store during non-peak hours so I can be in and out quick.  My mom tells me that I'm wasting money because if I go when there are free samples, I can get a free lunch.  Besides the fact that it adds half an hour to the time, that also requires eating multiple samples instead of just one.  So I guess free is also worth any amount of shame.

"But Lisa, if it's on a toothpick, it's free!"
"It's not the years in your life that count, it's the life in your years." - Office coffee cup.

daen

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #678 on: April 24, 2013, 03:04:27 PM »
A major grocery store in my town stopped doing samples on Friday night because too many people would show up and scarf all the samples - as their date night. They switched to Saturday until 1 pm, and the sample consumption became much more in line with stores in other towns.

Also in my town - I was told by the manager of the cosmetics department in a large drugstore that it was fairly common for teen girls to stop by and do their date makeup from the free samples on display. Granted, my town is quite conservative, and I'm guessing that this was both frugal behaviour of a questionable variety, but also a way to get around the "There will be no makeup in my house!" dictum.

Hillia

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #679 on: April 24, 2013, 03:19:48 PM »
My IL's, especially FIL, are very, very cheap.  It's actually kind of ruining DH's pleasure in buying our first home.  We have not told the ILs yet, and won't until we close and it's a done deal (Friday...yay!).  We paid a fair price for a property that we really like and are excited about moving in and making it our own.  However, DH is dreading the inevitable lecture from FIL about how he bought his property for $25k and it had more land with it and blah blah.  Well sure, but that was 25 years ago...the house was the manager's home on a now-abandoned oilfield...20 miles from a hazmat disposal site...in some of the ugliest, hottest, most barren territory you can imagine.

EmmaJ.

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #680 on: April 24, 2013, 03:26:50 PM »
My IL's, especially FIL, are very, very cheap.  It's actually kind of ruining DH's pleasure in buying our first home.  We have not told the ILs yet, and won't until we close and it's a done deal (Friday...yay!).  We paid a fair price for a property that we really like and are excited about moving in and making it our own.  However, DH is dreading the inevitable lecture from FIL about how he bought his property for $25k and it had more land with it and blah blah.  Well sure, but that was 25 years ago...the house was the manager's home on a now-abandoned oilfield...20 miles from a hazmat disposal site...in some of the ugliest, hottest, most barren territory you can imagine.

Congratulations on your new home!

Hillia

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #681 on: April 24, 2013, 03:35:43 PM »
An interesting article on sample gluttony.  One man was actually arrested and charged with 3 misdemeanors for filling produce bags full of samples and freebies.  He did a year of probation but is now suing the store for violating his civil rights.

http://money.msn.com/saving-money-tips/post.aspx?post=9bd235ea-6fe7-4486-89bf-30e6ce887e7d

gramma dishes

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #682 on: April 24, 2013, 04:35:00 PM »
My IL's, especially FIL, are very, very cheap.  It's actually kind of ruining DH's pleasure in buying our first home.  We have not told the ILs yet, and won't until we close and it's a done deal (Friday...yay!).  We paid a fair price for a property that we really like and are excited about moving in and making it our own.  However, DH is dreading the inevitable lecture from FIL about how he bought his property for $25k and it had more land with it and blah blah.  Well sure, but that was 25 years ago...the house was the manager's home on a now-abandoned oilfield...20 miles from a hazmat disposal site...in some of the ugliest, hottest, most barren territory you can imagine.

Laughed at your post, but really -- why does FIL need to know how much (or little) you paid for your own house? 

Hillia

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #683 on: April 24, 2013, 04:50:13 PM »
He doesn't, and we're practicing 'We paid a fair market price for the property we wanted'.  It's tough for DH to stand up to his family.

I'mnotinsane

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #684 on: April 24, 2013, 06:16:41 PM »
If your FIL goes so far to look up the sale price in public records that phrase still works.

VorFemme

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #685 on: April 24, 2013, 07:34:23 PM »
An interesting article on sample gluttony.  One man was actually arrested and charged with 3 misdemeanors for filling produce bags full of samples and freebies.  He did a year of probation but is now suing the store for violating his civil rights.

http://money.msn.com/saving-money-tips/post.aspx?post=9bd235ea-6fe7-4486-89bf-30e6ce887e7d

Cheapskate and SS, textbook example, if you ask me.
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I explain?

ladyknight1

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #686 on: April 24, 2013, 07:35:01 PM »
It is very easy and simple to find the purchase price and the appraised value in my area. All you need is the address.
ďAll that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

FauxFoodist

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #687 on: April 24, 2013, 07:52:42 PM »
When I'm tired and grumpy, I always find myself thinking "Man, I'd pay 10% more if I could only find all this stuff under one roof."

I'm like this, nowadays, too.  DH and I waited a few weeks until we had two 20% off coupons for BB&B so we could buy two sets of service for 8 flatware and save $40.  However, I didn't think to also bring in the 10% off coupon we had, and we also purchased some napkins and placemats at full price.  I thought about it briefly, realized that BB&B is nowhere we are normally and figured it wasn't worth saving about $2 to have to make another trip out there when, really, we'd been to BB&B around 3-4 times since we got together 4+ years ago.

However, years ago, I used to be the person who would do whatever I could to save money and spent lots of time "chasing the sales."  It really wore me out though.  I don't have the time or patience now (still want to save money, but I'm fine with paying a little more if everything I need is at one or two locations).  Still, for our wedding, I checked the cost of renting vs. purchasing several things, like table linens and chair covers and found, for most things, it was cheaper to buy what we needed.  We now have things like 100 chair covers (about 20 brand-new) and 100 chair sashes, but, sadly it would've cost us more to rent them.  I figure we'll try to sell them at some point, but I certainly wasn't going to pay more to rent them and have nothing to show for it at the end (we won't be giving them away either because we did pay something for them so I want to recoup some of our expenses).

This isn't quite a cheapskate story (unless the shop owner was the one to tell it), but my and DH's engagement and wedding rings, altogether, cost us around $300.  Neither of us are into jewelry, and I saw no point in spending lots of money on something, while meaningful in its symbolism, means nothing to me as far as precious metals are concerned.  The store owner, when we ordered our wedding bands, kept making cracks about us calling him to "upgrade" our rings to gold in a few years when we could afford it.  I finally got annoyed enough to shut him down and tell him, "I don't care about jewelry so this as good as it's going to get.  I received as my 'engagement gift' a nice car that I really needed, which is what I told DH I wanted, is parked outside and suits me much better."  Stupid man shut up but also cost himself any future business from us for intimating we were cheap or penniless or both (it was an Irish store, not a jewelry store -- we were ordering Celtic wedding bands from Ireland).  For the record (which I didn't tell the stupid man), DH wanted to buy me an expensive (for us) engagement ring.  I turned him down and said that if wanted to get me something "big" to get me a car as it was much more practical and something I needed...so he got me a car (I pointed out I couldn't very well drive a ring and would feel stupid riding around in public transportation because I couldn't afford a car yet was sporting an expensive ring).

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #688 on: April 25, 2013, 09:57:45 AM »
When a friend of mine and his wife were getting married, they were having a large outdoor casual ceremony.  They looked into renting chairs.  Then they looked into how much those plain white patio chairs would be.  It was about the same price.  So they bought the chairs and told everyone to take their chair home, if they wanted, as their favour.  Almost everyone did and a number of their friends and relatives are still using those chairs more than a decade later.

I like saving money.  But I like saving time as much or more.  So when the week's grocery flyers come in, I write down what is on special at each store that I'm potentially interested in.  Then I write my grocery list.  I'll go to the one store, or at most, two, that covers off most of my list.  And then just pay full price for whatever else I need.  I am not driving all over town, probably spending more in gas than I'm saving.

There are a bunch of different stores at the far end of town that I sometimes shop at.  But because it is the furthest away and it is a PITA traffic wise, I'll make one south end trip every couple of months, only.  Usually coinciding with Buy 3 get the 4th free sales at the book store.   :D
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
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MommyPenguin

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #689 on: April 25, 2013, 10:45:05 AM »
An interesting article on sample gluttony.  One man was actually arrested and charged with 3 misdemeanors for filling produce bags full of samples and freebies.  He did a year of probation but is now suing the store for violating his civil rights.

http://money.msn.com/saving-money-tips/post.aspx?post=9bd235ea-6fe7-4486-89bf-30e6ce887e7d

Cheapskate and SS, textbook example, if you ask me.

My favorite quote, from the comments on another article about this guy, is somebody saying that it sounds like this guy needs a "free sample of our penal system."  Love it.
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