Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 204234 times)

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GreenEyedHawk

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #720 on: April 25, 2013, 11:34:40 PM »
Figgie, I have no words.
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Bottlecaps

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #721 on: April 25, 2013, 11:43:10 PM »
Figgie, I have no words.

POD. That is absolutely appalling.
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Figgie

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #722 on: April 26, 2013, 01:16:18 AM »
I just looked at my spouse with my mouth opened when he told me about them eating and trying to take the food that the church had prepared for the family members.  While I  knew that they attended the funerals of strangers in order to get free lunches, it never crossed my mind that they would go and steal food from the family at a wake.

And like many cheapskates, they get angry when caught and blame the person who tells them to stop.  While neither of them dared to stop speaking to my spouse (that entire family speaks fluent passive-aggressive)  :) they were pretty unhappy with how unreasonable they thought he was being.

I really don't understand people who do that sort of thing.  Especially since neither of them were poor and they didn't grow up particularly poor either.  Makes NO sense to me!

Coralreef

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #723 on: April 26, 2013, 06:51:39 AM »
Figgie, I have no words.

POD. That is absolutely appalling.

I agree, appalling.  And despicable. 

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gramma dishes

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #724 on: April 26, 2013, 09:23:13 AM »
Am I the only one who kind of wishes that several family members had arrived on the scene with your husband?  It might be a good thing for several members of the family to have witnessed!   The behavior of your Aunt and Uncle is some of the most disgusting funeral behavior I've heard of yet. 


bloo

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #725 on: April 26, 2013, 09:30:36 AM »
An interesting article on sample gluttony.  One man was actually arrested and charged with 3 misdemeanors for filling produce bags full of samples and freebies.  He did a year of probation but is now suing the store for violating his civil rights.

http://money.msn.com/saving-money-tips/post.aspx?post=9bd235ea-6fe7-4486-89bf-30e6ce887e7d

Holy cow. Note to self: Never accept a job doing demos.

I rarely take a sample when I'm at Sam's (or wherever) because I feel bad that I'm likely not going to buy it.

I was once cajoled to watch a knife demo at Sam's Club, whereupon watching it, I'd get a free knife. I watched but could not bring myself to join the horde getting their knives because I knew I was not going to buy.

To be clear, there's nothing wrong with politely taking free samples that are offered and it's entirely possible that I'd change my mind and actually purchase a product after sampling...but that only happened once. So I usually steer clear of the samples. My kids like them but will not go to every one and I will rain all kinds of fire down on their heads if I see them behaving like some of the adults in the article/ comments do.

alkira6

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #726 on: April 26, 2013, 09:33:48 AM »
See, i try to avaoid sample days at Sam's because of the opposite reason - we usually wind up spending $60-$100 that we didn't mean to spend.  DH will taste something and all of a sudden it's in the cart.

MerryCat

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #727 on: April 26, 2013, 09:42:41 AM »
Figgie, I have no words.

POD. That is absolutely appalling.

I agree, appalling.  And despicable.

Wow... just... wow.. There's cheap and then there's this which crosses the line into I something else.. I don't even know what to call it. Good on your spouse for his shiny spine!

Seven Ate Nine

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #728 on: April 26, 2013, 09:46:32 AM »


I was once cajoled to watch a knife demo at Sam's Club, whereupon watching it, I'd get a free knife. I watched but could not bring myself to join the horde getting their knives because I knew I was not going to buy.


I think I got stuck watching the same demo.  I totally took the knife, because the guy harassed me into watching the demo after I told him straight out that there was no way I'd be buying knives that day.

readingchick

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #729 on: April 26, 2013, 09:50:15 AM »
Figgie, if I didn't know any better I'd think you were related to my SO somehow. His sister and brother-in-law are double-digit multimillionaires but they cry poor every chance they get and every time there's a free meal anywhere they'll show up with plate and silverware in hand. It's insane!

Twik

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #730 on: April 26, 2013, 10:07:40 AM »
Figgie, I have no words.

POD. That is absolutely appalling.

I agree, appalling.  And despicable.

The idea of free food seems to make some people go into some sort of animalistic frenzy, where social mores and basic morality are chucked out in order to score a handful of sandwiches. It's a weird thing.
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Melle

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #731 on: April 26, 2013, 10:14:09 AM »
That reminds me of some my best friend's relatives (yes, there's more than one or two persons who actually do that) who will bring tupperware to any family gathering, be it weddings, birthdays or funerals.

Figgie

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #732 on: April 26, 2013, 01:02:55 PM »
That reminds me of some my best friend's relatives (yes, there's more than one or two persons who actually do that) who will bring tupperware to any family gathering, be it weddings, birthdays or funerals.

Oh, the two of them did that too. :)  They would show up at any family gathering and try to fill up their tupperware before people had a chance to eat.  My mother-in-law handled it by waiting until they were greeting people and then she would take the paper sacks of tupperware and stash them away so that they couldn't find them.

And they had brought two grocery sacks full of tupperware  to the church.  They must have stuck it down in the church basement before they came through the receiving line.  What is terribly ironic, is that both of them would consider themselves to be good, honest Catholics. :)

The reason it was only my spouse that was in the church kitchen in the basement of the church, was because we all tried to just leave one at a time so that there were always family there to greet the people.  It was a small rural area, my father-in-law had lived their all his life and was the banker at the small local bank.  We probably had almost a thousand people show up at the wake and another 300 for the funeral.

They did try at my Father-in-laws funeral luncheon, to have the church ladies bag up the extras.  They were told no (traditionally all the extras are divided out and given to the immediate family after the luncheon) and they griped about that. 

I heard that from a friend who was doing some of the serving during the funeral lunch.  After all, they were FAMILY and so they should get the extras. :)

They are both gone now, but the stories linger on.

TOLady

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #733 on: April 26, 2013, 01:16:34 PM »
My ex was a definite cheapskate. We never went out for dinner unless it was a 2-4-1 coupon - even on my birthday. This isn't cheapskate, but downright theft, but he would get up very early in the morning and walk around our neighbourhood and take bread out of the bags left for the local restaurants. I never got a gift that wasn't from a garage sale, etc.

However, there was one time that I still shudder to remember.

I worked in a very nice small office. I was working away when the VP came into the office and said, "There's a well dressed guy in a suit in the men's room and he putting rolls of toilet paper into his briefcase."  :o

Shortly after, there is a knock at the door and I go to buzz them in.

Yup - sure enough - there's my boyfriend!  ::)

Virg

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #734 on: April 26, 2013, 02:08:53 PM »
snowflake wrote:

"So now here is the cheapskate part:  For the past few months, the friends have been complaining to no end about this.  They have stopped wondering if they should have full liability and have focused on the greed of the claim.

"Well it must be nice to have someone to pay you to lie around for a year.  I didn't realize it was OK to go on vacation just because you get hit.  I think I'll go get in an accident and not work."

"I don't know how anyone manages to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on medical bills.  Even my lasik surgery was less!"

"Of COURSE he can just have all that physical therapy because it's on our dime!" "

This goes far beyond cheapskate behavior and well into scumbag territory.  If these people were my friends before these complaints I wouldn't have to worry about bean dipping them because I'd not be speaking to them.  Anyone who thinks that an injury bad enough to require multiple surgeries and six months of recovery qualifies as a "vacation" is far too self-absorbed for my taste.

Virg