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Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 625790 times)

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CakeBeret

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #690 on: April 25, 2013, 02:07:21 PM »
An interesting article on sample gluttony.  One man was actually arrested and charged with 3 misdemeanors for filling produce bags full of samples and freebies.  He did a year of probation but is now suing the store for violating his civil rights.

http://money.msn.com/saving-money-tips/post.aspx?post=9bd235ea-6fe7-4486-89bf-30e6ce887e7d

Cheapskate and SS, textbook example, if you ask me.

My favorite quote, from the comments on another article about this guy, is somebody saying that it sounds like this guy needs a "free sample of our penal system."  Love it.

Bahahaha. Fantastic. Yeah, IMO the line is when you are stuffing free samples into your pockets to take home. Eat it at the store? Okay. Deliberately make a full meal out of it? A little iffy, IMO, but as long as you're not violating store policy and the store doesn't ask you to stop, fine. Stuffing a pound and a half of sausage into your pants (heh heh) after receiving previous warnings? Not at all acceptable.
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cheyne

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #691 on: April 25, 2013, 02:16:27 PM »
As I have become older I have started to equate time with money.  My job pays $XX per hour.  If the task I am going to perform isn't going to save me $XX + per hour=it doesn't pay me to do the task.  For ziploc baggies, the cost to sort, wash, find a place to dry, and put away later is going to be over the per bag cost to me, so I don't bother.  However, I will use the same bag for several days if I am bringing crackers, cookies or chips to work-just fill up and take with.

I knew a man (Benny) that was the essence of cheap.  There are many small towns in the rural area I lived in.  Several of the towns had home/farm stores that would do a free hotdog and pop day, or local businesses that would have free coffee/a donut.  Ol' Benny would drive 30 miles (one way) to go to the store and get his free hotdog or donut.  He had an early '80's Lincoln that maybe got 15 miles to the gallon.  With gas at $2.50, he was spending $10. to get his "free" hotdog or donut.  He would brag about it, never understanding that he spent enough on gas to buy several packages of hotdogs and buns.

weeblewobble

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #692 on: April 25, 2013, 04:11:37 PM »
When I'm tired and grumpy, I always find myself thinking "Man, I'd pay 10% more if I could only find all this stuff under one roof."

This isn't quite a cheapskate story (unless the shop owner was the one to tell it), but my and DH's engagement and wedding rings, altogether, cost us around $300.  Neither of us are into jewelry, and I saw no point in spending lots of money on something, while meaningful in its symbolism, means nothing to me as far as precious metals are concerned.  The store owner, when we ordered our wedding bands, kept making cracks about us calling him to "upgrade" our rings to gold in a few years when we could afford it.  I finally got annoyed enough to shut him down and tell him, "I don't care about jewelry so this as good as it's going to get.  I received as my 'engagement gift' a nice car that I really needed, which is what I told DH I wanted, is parked outside and suits me much better."  Stupid man shut up but also cost himself any future business from us for intimating we were cheap or penniless or both (it was an Irish store, not a jewelry store -- we were ordering Celtic wedding bands from Ireland).  For the record (which I didn't tell the stupid man), DH wanted to buy me an expensive (for us) engagement ring.  I turned him down and said that if wanted to get me something "big" to get me a car as it was much more practical and something I needed...so he got me a car (I pointed out I couldn't very well drive a ring and would feel stupid riding around in public transportation because I couldn't afford a car yet was sporting an expensive ring).

When my great-grandmother died, she left me a lovely large diamond solitaire pendant.  Now, I don't have great luck with pendants, for some reason I tend to break the chains and lose the charms.  And I couldn't imagine how devastated I would be if I lost great-grandma's pendant.  So I talked it over with my then-BF who was planning to propose in the near future and I offered the pendant to him to use the diamond as the stone in my engagement ring.  (I have much better luck caring for rings.)  I was sure to ask whether it made him feel awkward for me to contribute to my own engagement ring.  He said, no, it was pretty indicative of our relationship, a true partnership that breaks certain social norms. :)

Soon-to-be DH walked into a jewelers to discuss having the stone re-set.  When he said he needed to talk about engagement rings, the salesman seemed thrilled, was polite and enthusiastic.  But the moment DH mentioned having a stone re-set into a ring and presented the pendant, the salesman's enthusiasm died.  He scoffed at DH for being "stingy" and "making his girlfriend provide her own diamond."  He told DH that he didn't see the point of "re-gifting" a stone and this was going to bring down his sales commission (as opposed to the commission he would get if DH buying a ring with a stone).  He said he should charge DH a "handling fee" based on what the pendant was worth.  DH put the pendant back in his coat pocket and said, "Clearly you're not interested in my business." 

He walked out of the store and about a block down the street, where he found another jeweler who was MORE THAN HAPPY to re-set the stone into a ring and commended DH on the romantic gesture of making a family heirloom into a ring.  So the snotty salesman managed to cheat himself out of DH's business and the business of several of DH's coworkers (who were planning on proposing to their lady friends), whom DH referred to the second, more accommodating jeweler.

ladyknight1

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #693 on: April 25, 2013, 05:25:07 PM »
As I have become older I have started to equate time with money.  My job pays $XX per hour.  If the task I am going to perform isn't going to save me $XX + per hour=it doesn't pay me to do the task.  For ziploc baggies, the cost to sort, wash, find a place to dry, and put away later is going to be over the per bag cost to me, so I don't bother.  However, I will use the same bag for several days if I am bringing crackers, cookies or chips to work-just fill up and take with.

I knew a man (Benny) that was the essence of cheap.  There are many small towns in the rural area I lived in.  Several of the towns had home/farm stores that would do a free hotdog and pop day, or local businesses that would have free coffee/a donut.  Ol' Benny would drive 30 miles (one way) to go to the store and get his free hotdog or donut.  He had an early '80's Lincoln that maybe got 15 miles to the gallon.  With gas at $2.50, he was spending $10. to get his "free" hotdog or donut.  He would brag about it, never understanding that he spent enough on gas to buy several packages of hotdogs and buns.

The bolded is what made me start taking the toll roads to and from work. 30 minute commute at $2.50 or 1 hour (with good traffic flow) and just as much paid in fuel. I also have a few minutes of "me" time before dealing with homework or family needs.
ďAll that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
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Figgie

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #694 on: April 25, 2013, 09:42:12 PM »
My spouse's Aunt and Uncle would attend the funerals of total strangers and then go to the funeral luncheons.  This was their way of "eating out" without having to pay for anything. 

When someone confronted them about this, they were both upset with that person and said that it didn't make any difference whether or not they knew the deceased or the family, as they were there to offer their condolences to the family. 

Of course, they never sent a card or flowers to these families as they were far too cheap to spend that much money on someone they didn't know.

When my father-in-law died, the process at the small, rural Catholic church was for the wake to be held the day before the funeral.  It would start at around 4 p.m. and end around 8 p.m.  Since this was over the supper hour, the ladies of the church provided sandwiches, chips, bars and bottled water in the church basement for the immediate family.

So, the sons, daughters-in-law and grandchildren who were in the funeral equivalent of a receiving line, would alternate taking breaks sometime during the wake to grab something to eat.  When my spouse took his break, he found his Aunt and Uncle sitting in the church basement eating the sandwiches and wrapping up what they saw as "extras" to take home with them.

He asked them what they were doing and his Uncle said angrily that they were eating because they were family.  My spouse pointed out that they weren't immediate family and that they weren't the ones standing greeting and thanking people who came to the wake.  He also told them that other family members had not eaten yet and that they needed to put back the food they were taking.

He stood and watched as they unloaded themselves of over a dozen bottles of bottled water, a couple dozen sandwiches, two bags of chips and what looked like an entire pan of bars.  After they had put it back (and he said they had steam coming out of their ears),  he told them not to come back down to the basement or touch any more of the food.

My spouse is the oldest son and the quiet one in his family.  He never raises his voice but when he says no, not one person in his family is going to be brave enough to argue with him. :)

By the way...his Aunt and Uncle were not poor people or starving people.  They had plenty of money but why spend it when they could get a free lunch just by attending the funeral of a total stranger!

GreenEyedHawk

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #695 on: April 25, 2013, 10:34:40 PM »
Figgie, I have no words.
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Bottlecaps

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #696 on: April 25, 2013, 10:43:10 PM »
Figgie, I have no words.

POD. That is absolutely appalling.
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Figgie

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #697 on: April 26, 2013, 12:16:18 AM »
I just looked at my spouse with my mouth opened when he told me about them eating and trying to take the food that the church had prepared for the family members.  While I  knew that they attended the funerals of strangers in order to get free lunches, it never crossed my mind that they would go and steal food from the family at a wake.

And like many cheapskates, they get angry when caught and blame the person who tells them to stop.  While neither of them dared to stop speaking to my spouse (that entire family speaks fluent passive-aggressive)  :) they were pretty unhappy with how unreasonable they thought he was being.

I really don't understand people who do that sort of thing.  Especially since neither of them were poor and they didn't grow up particularly poor either.  Makes NO sense to me!

Coralreef

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #698 on: April 26, 2013, 05:51:39 AM »
Figgie, I have no words.

POD. That is absolutely appalling.

I agree, appalling.  And despicable. 
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gramma dishes

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #699 on: April 26, 2013, 08:23:13 AM »
Am I the only one who kind of wishes that several family members had arrived on the scene with your husband?  It might be a good thing for several members of the family to have witnessed!   The behavior of your Aunt and Uncle is some of the most disgusting funeral behavior I've heard of yet. 


bloo

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #700 on: April 26, 2013, 08:30:36 AM »
An interesting article on sample gluttony.  One man was actually arrested and charged with 3 misdemeanors for filling produce bags full of samples and freebies.  He did a year of probation but is now suing the store for violating his civil rights.

http://money.msn.com/saving-money-tips/post.aspx?post=9bd235ea-6fe7-4486-89bf-30e6ce887e7d

Holy cow. Note to self: Never accept a job doing demos.

I rarely take a sample when I'm at Sam's (or wherever) because I feel bad that I'm likely not going to buy it.

I was once cajoled to watch a knife demo at Sam's Club, whereupon watching it, I'd get a free knife. I watched but could not bring myself to join the horde getting their knives because I knew I was not going to buy.

To be clear, there's nothing wrong with politely taking free samples that are offered and it's entirely possible that I'd change my mind and actually purchase a product after sampling...but that only happened once. So I usually steer clear of the samples. My kids like them but will not go to every one and I will rain all kinds of fire down on their heads if I see them behaving like some of the adults in the article/ comments do.

alkira6

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #701 on: April 26, 2013, 08:33:48 AM »
See, i try to avaoid sample days at Sam's because of the opposite reason - we usually wind up spending $60-$100 that we didn't mean to spend.  DH will taste something and all of a sudden it's in the cart.

MerryCat

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #702 on: April 26, 2013, 08:42:41 AM »
Figgie, I have no words.

POD. That is absolutely appalling.

I agree, appalling.  And despicable.

Wow... just... wow.. There's cheap and then there's this which crosses the line into I something else.. I don't even know what to call it. Good on your spouse for his shiny spine!

Seven Ate Nine

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #703 on: April 26, 2013, 08:46:32 AM »


I was once cajoled to watch a knife demo at Sam's Club, whereupon watching it, I'd get a free knife. I watched but could not bring myself to join the horde getting their knives because I knew I was not going to buy.


I think I got stuck watching the same demo.  I totally took the knife, because the guy harassed me into watching the demo after I told him straight out that there was no way I'd be buying knives that day.

readingchick

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #704 on: April 26, 2013, 08:50:15 AM »
Figgie, if I didn't know any better I'd think you were related to my SO somehow. His sister and brother-in-law are double-digit multimillionaires but they cry poor every chance they get and every time there's a free meal anywhere they'll show up with plate and silverware in hand. It's insane!