News: IMPORTANT UPDATE REGARDING SITE IN FORUM ANNOUNCEMENT FOLDER.

  • May 23, 2018, 04:18:23 AM

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 625159 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Twik

  • Member
  • Posts: 29055
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #705 on: April 26, 2013, 09:07:40 AM »
Figgie, I have no words.

POD. That is absolutely appalling.

I agree, appalling.  And despicable.

The idea of free food seems to make some people go into some sort of animalistic frenzy, where social mores and basic morality are chucked out in order to score a handful of sandwiches. It's a weird thing.
"The sky's the limit. Your sky. Your limit. Now, let's dance!"

Mal

  • Member
  • Posts: 288
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #706 on: April 26, 2013, 09:14:09 AM »
That reminds me of some my best friend's relatives (yes, there's more than one or two persons who actually do that) who will bring tupperware to any family gathering, be it weddings, birthdays or funerals.

Figgie

  • Member
  • Posts: 474
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #707 on: April 26, 2013, 12:02:55 PM »
That reminds me of some my best friend's relatives (yes, there's more than one or two persons who actually do that) who will bring tupperware to any family gathering, be it weddings, birthdays or funerals.

Oh, the two of them did that too. :)  They would show up at any family gathering and try to fill up their tupperware before people had a chance to eat.  My mother-in-law handled it by waiting until they were greeting people and then she would take the paper sacks of tupperware and stash them away so that they couldn't find them.

And they had brought two grocery sacks full of tupperware  to the church.  They must have stuck it down in the church basement before they came through the receiving line.  What is terribly ironic, is that both of them would consider themselves to be good, honest Catholics. :)

The reason it was only my spouse that was in the church kitchen in the basement of the church, was because we all tried to just leave one at a time so that there were always family there to greet the people.  It was a small rural area, my father-in-law had lived their all his life and was the banker at the small local bank.  We probably had almost a thousand people show up at the wake and another 300 for the funeral.

They did try at my Father-in-laws funeral luncheon, to have the church ladies bag up the extras.  They were told no (traditionally all the extras are divided out and given to the immediate family after the luncheon) and they griped about that. 

I heard that from a friend who was doing some of the serving during the funeral lunch.  After all, they were FAMILY and so they should get the extras. :)

They are both gone now, but the stories linger on.

TOLady

  • Member
  • Posts: 213
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #708 on: April 26, 2013, 12:16:34 PM »
My ex was a definite cheapskate. We never went out for dinner unless it was a 2-4-1 coupon - even on my birthday. This isn't cheapskate, but downright theft, but he would get up very early in the morning and walk around our neighbourhood and take bread out of the bags left for the local restaurants. I never got a gift that wasn't from a garage sale, etc.

However, there was one time that I still shudder to remember.

I worked in a very nice small office. I was working away when the VP came into the office and said, "There's a well dressed guy in a suit in the men's room and he putting rolls of toilet paper into his briefcase."  :o

Shortly after, there is a knock at the door and I go to buzz them in.

Yup - sure enough - there's my boyfriend!  ::)

Virg

  • Member
  • Posts: 5412
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #709 on: April 26, 2013, 01:08:53 PM »
snowflake wrote:

"So now here is the cheapskate part:  For the past few months, the friends have been complaining to no end about this.  They have stopped wondering if they should have full liability and have focused on the greed of the claim.

"Well it must be nice to have someone to pay you to lie around for a year.  I didn't realize it was OK to go on vacation just because you get hit.  I think I'll go get in an accident and not work."

"I don't know how anyone manages to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on medical bills.  Even my lasik surgery was less!"

"Of COURSE he can just have all that physical therapy because it's on our dime!" "

This goes far beyond cheapskate behavior and well into scumbag territory.  If these people were my friends before these complaints I wouldn't have to worry about bean dipping them because I'd not be speaking to them.  Anyone who thinks that an injury bad enough to require multiple surgeries and six months of recovery qualifies as a "vacation" is far too self-absorbed for my taste.

Virg

reflection5

  • Member
  • Posts: 436
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #710 on: April 26, 2013, 02:09:17 PM »
My ex was a definite cheapskate. We never went out for dinner unless it was a 2-4-1 coupon - even on my birthday. This isn't cheapskate, but downright theft, but he would get up very early in the morning and walk around our neighbourhood and take bread out of the bags left for the local restaurants. I never got a gift that wasn't from a garage sale, etc.

However, there was one time that I still shudder to remember.

I worked in a very nice small office. I was working away when the VP came into the office and said, "There's a well dressed guy in a suit in the men's room and he putting rolls of toilet paper into his briefcase."   :o

Shortly after, there is a knock at the door and I go to buzz them in.

Yup - sure enough - there's my boyfriend!  ::)

(not sure what you mean - did people leave bags of bread for the restaurants - or residents?")

Either way, yes, it's theft.

I remember catching a neighbor who stole my newspapers way back in the day when I lived in an apartment bldg where you had to walk down a long hallway.  I suspected it was the guy living across me.  (A friend said I should have put out an old newspaper with a nasty note inside) but I decided to try to catch him in the act.  I got up really early and just waited at the door, looking out the peephole.  Sure enough, at about 5:45am I heard the carrier toss my Sunday paper on the floor in the hall.  Then I saw the guy across the hall very quietly come out, look to the left and right, and bend down.  I yanked my door open, grabbed my paper, and he turned all shades of red.  ;)  Just like your ex, OP, he was a cheapskate AND also a thief.
« Last Edit: April 27, 2013, 11:30:34 AM by reflection5 »

Amara

  • Member
  • Posts: 2134
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #711 on: April 26, 2013, 02:20:50 PM »
Did he ever take it again?

ladyknight1

  • Member
  • Posts: 12217
  • Not all those who wander are lost
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #712 on: April 26, 2013, 08:40:32 PM »
Many restaurants have bread delivered before they open, so the packages stay by the door until someone comes in.
ďAll that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

Julian

  • I lost it between Thriller and Gangnam Style...
  • Member
  • Posts: 1104
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #713 on: April 26, 2013, 09:00:57 PM »
Another 'less cheap, more theft' tale.

I used to work in the operating rooms as a nurse.  We weren't terribly well paid then, and there was often limited capacity to leave the OR block for meals, so most of us brought in something from home and put it in the communal fridge.

Frequently you'd come into the break room and find doctors, who were only there usually for a four hour session and all of them on much bigger salaries than the nurses, rummaging through our lunches for something to eat.  Even though there were usually some forms of food (bread, cheese, tomatoes, cold meat, biscuits and sandwiches) provided for them.

Often on late shifts we'd bring in something to share - nice bakery bread, cake or slices.  One night I brought in a large sweet iced bun, but I got stuck in a case until fairly late in the shift.  Starving, I though 'Oh well, at least there'll be some bun!'  No, not really.  Some doc found it and scarfed the lot.

Out on the patio we'd sit,
And the humidity we'd breathe,
We'd watch the lightning crack over canefields
Laugh and think, this is Australia.

Ganggajang - Sounds Of Then (This Is Australia)

NyaChan

  • Member
  • Posts: 3665
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #714 on: April 26, 2013, 09:27:27 PM »
Another 'less cheap, more theft' tale.

I used to work in the operating rooms as a nurse.  We weren't terribly well paid then, and there was often limited capacity to leave the OR block for meals, so most of us brought in something from home and put it in the communal fridge.

Frequently you'd come into the break room and find doctors, who were only there usually for a four hour session and all of them on much bigger salaries than the nurses, rummaging through our lunches for something to eat.  Even though there were usually some forms of food (bread, cheese, tomatoes, cold meat, biscuits and sandwiches) provided for them.

Often on late shifts we'd bring in something to share - nice bakery bread, cake or slices.  One night I brought in a large sweet iced bun, but I got stuck in a case until fairly late in the shift.  Starving, I though 'Oh well, at least there'll be some bun!'  No, not really.  Some doc found it and scarfed the lot.

That's so bad!  My sister is doing her residency right now and the attendings on her floor have a habit of buying dinner for their underlings who are on call.  They make a point of mentioning that their own superiors had done the same for them when they were still newbies and paying off their loans, and that the residents should pass on the favor when they are on top someday. 

ladyknight1

  • Member
  • Posts: 12217
  • Not all those who wander are lost
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #715 on: April 26, 2013, 09:40:23 PM »
My cousin is a NICU nurse at a hospital. The staff bring in their lunches, and they had to install double padlocks on the refrigerator and freezer, otherwise the visitors to the patients on their floor (newborns and their mothers) would steal their lunches!
ďAll that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

reflection5

  • Member
  • Posts: 436
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #716 on: April 27, 2013, 11:29:10 AM »
Did he ever take it again?
No, and whenever I saw him he averted his eyes and didn't even speak. 

The idea of putting an old (decoy) newspaper outside my door early in the morning was tempting, but I never did it.  But it used to make me mad that I had to get dressed, go out and buy another Sunday paper to replace the one he had stolen.  It happened about 6 times before I caught and stopped him.
« Last Edit: April 27, 2013, 02:46:12 PM by reflection5 »

kherbert05

  • Member
  • Posts: 7946
    • Trees downed in my yard by Ike and the clean up
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #717 on: April 27, 2013, 11:33:06 AM »
Sis told there is a group of families that when ever one of them comes into her hospital to give birth - the staff has to go on high alert. The families are like locus. They strip the place bare. If the person delivering meals leaves the cart to go in and you know deliver a meal - the family will swarm and take every meal off the cart. They steal from staff and family. When they notice extra security on the floor - they scream discrimination.
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

FauxFoodist

  • Member
  • Posts: 5015
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #718 on: April 27, 2013, 01:01:04 PM »
Bringing home trash (literally picked up off the curb) for our use.

I'll admit that DH and I've done this a couple or three times.  We'd returned to his apartment (when he was still living there) to find a pine computer table, a white cabinet and a white shelf unit next to the dumpsters (all at different times).  They looked perfectly fine so I asked him to get them.  I figured that since these were small apartments (studio and one-bedroom), people probably moved and didn't want to take these things with them (seriously, they were perfectly fine; not even dirty -- if there'd been something wrong with them, they would've gone back to the trash).

I suppose you could call us cheap as almost all of our furniture we got for free through hand-me-downs from friends and family or via Freecycle, but we're happy with them (we got a great china cabinet through Craigslist for only $50; the seller surmised it was worth around $800 as it is mostly -- except the back -- solid wood).

FauxFoodist

  • Member
  • Posts: 5015
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #719 on: April 27, 2013, 01:06:32 PM »
Friend, finding the surplus hot water, insisted in putting it into a thermos flask to keep it hot until a future occasion when hot water would be wanted.

I could see myself doing this, too, but it's more the guilt of not conserving water, rather than just trying to save money (everyone pays the same rate in our area -- no meters -- so it wouldn't save us any money).  I don't actually do it though.  I feel guilty about wasting water these days, but I don't do anything to conserve it (I just dump it, like if it's in a measuring cup or spoon and I didn't need that much).