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Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 625769 times)

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FauxFoodist

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #720 on: April 27, 2013, 01:17:34 PM »
I explained the source and he said.  "The other day his boss held a senior management meeting at which he announced that the company was no longer going to waste money on paper clips.  The meeting went on for an hour and a half in which he explained what documents were to be stapled instead of held together with paper clips.  Harvey wants to be able to identify his paper clips so he can get them back, so can we get him a box that are all one color, like blue?" 

I told him I'd ask our office manager, but also speculated on how this man could justify wasting 90 minutes of his highest-paid employees' time over an annual office expenditure that didn't equal the hourly wage of any of them.  My boss knew this didn't make any sense, but we didn't want to lose the account.

Our next CEO resigned the account three years later over a difference of opinion regarding how the client was handling a product's second year in the market.  That client is no longer in business.

Off-topic, but, upthread, I posted about a manager who had his daughter call our office from their house so she could be transferred to the manager's new location with the toll charges being charged to the company.

My first day of employment there, I was told to always staple documents with the staple at a 45-degree angle to the corner because Manager didn't like it when the staple was parallel to the edge of the paper (when he'd flip the page, the flipped page would tear off the staple).  After a few months, Manager asked me to show him how I attached paperclips to documents.  I showed him, and he directed me to clip the paperclips so the small part was always in front because when he flipped the pages I clipped with the large part in front, the pages would flip off.

He was an otherwise great guy to work for, but you gotta wonder that if that much attention was being paid to such tiny things, he must've developed one heck of an ulcer as he would've been stressed out all the time (and he was super super-cheap also).

Thipu1

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #721 on: April 27, 2013, 01:44:22 PM »
Ah, the 45 degree angle of the staple. 

When I first started work in the library, one of the first 'tests' I encountered was how I stapled a document.  I've always done the 45 degree angle because it causes the least damage to the paper. I passed that test.   

The proper orientation of a paper clip is something a little different.  That can get odd.  I always liked to put the clip on at a 45 degree angle with the large part of the clip in front.  If a document is small enough to be secured with a paper clip, it's small enough to be read and reconstructed without a major problem. 


KB

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #722 on: April 27, 2013, 05:53:57 PM »
The proper orientation of a paper clip is something a little different.  That can get odd.  I always liked to put the clip on at a 45 degree angle with the large part of the clip in front.  If a document is small enough to be secured with a paper clip, it's small enough to be read and reconstructed without a major problem.

For those whose bosses check those sorts of details, I recommend buying a packet of these and see if they still want to comment: doggy-themed paperclips

Girly

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #723 on: April 27, 2013, 07:15:56 PM »
I know two people that this happened to: The host at the bar-b-que bought steaks for himself and hot dogs for everyone else.
When my daughters were staying with DH's parents for a week, MIL and FIL ate lobster two nights, and gave the girls hot dogs.  Lobsters that they were GIVEN, 4 of them.  So it wasn't a case of "I don't want to buy lobster for kids that might not eat them."  And my girls were 9 and 12, old enough to be adventurous about eating all kinds of things, not just PBJ and cold cereal.

Unless I knew the girls liked lobster for sure before cooking them, I would have made something different for a 9 and 12 year old, too. Even if they were an adventurous eater. And even if the lobsters were given to me.

kherbert05

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #724 on: April 28, 2013, 12:26:00 AM »
I know two people that this happened to: The host at the bar-b-que bought steaks for himself and hot dogs for everyone else.
When my daughters were staying with DH's parents for a week, MIL and FIL ate lobster two nights, and gave the girls hot dogs.  Lobsters that they were GIVEN, 4 of them.  So it wasn't a case of "I don't want to buy lobster for kids that might not eat them."  And my girls were 9 and 12, old enough to be adventurous about eating all kinds of things, not just PBJ and cold cereal.

Unless I knew the girls liked lobster for sure before cooking them, I would have made something different for a 9 and 12 year old, too. Even if they were an adventurous eater. And even if the lobsters were given to me.
In my family, it would be expected that children that old would be eating the lobster - but my sister was downing oysters on the half shell with horseradish (requested by her with a lisp) in the sauce at age 3. In my family though shell fish aren't a rare treat. With my PEI family they are more of a staple coming directly off the boats of family and friends.
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

Venus193

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #725 on: April 28, 2013, 05:40:50 AM »
I had lobster for the first time when I was nine... and I've been hooked ever since!





artk2002

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #726 on: April 28, 2013, 08:22:12 AM »
I know two people that this happened to: The host at the bar-b-que bought steaks for himself and hot dogs for everyone else.
When my daughters were staying with DH's parents for a week, MIL and FIL ate lobster two nights, and gave the girls hot dogs.  Lobsters that they were GIVEN, 4 of them.  So it wasn't a case of "I don't want to buy lobster for kids that might not eat them."  And my girls were 9 and 12, old enough to be adventurous about eating all kinds of things, not just PBJ and cold cereal.

Unless I knew the girls liked lobster for sure before cooking them, I would have made something different for a 9 and 12 year old, too. Even if they were an adventurous eater. And even if the lobsters were given to me.

It is a major sin of hosting to serve yourself the "good stuff" and your guests something lesser. If the grandparents didn't think that the girls would like lobster, then everybody should have gotten hot dogs.
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.

Luci

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #727 on: April 28, 2013, 09:46:50 AM »
I know two people that this happened to: The host at the bar-b-que bought steaks for himself and hot dogs for everyone else.
When my daughters were staying with DH's parents for a week, MIL and FIL ate lobster two nights, and gave the girls hot dogs.  Lobsters that they were GIVEN, 4 of them.  So it wasn't a case of "I don't want to buy lobster for kids that might not eat them."  And my girls were 9 and 12, old enough to be adventurous about eating all kinds of things, not just PBJ and cold cereal.

Unless I knew the girls liked lobster for sure before cooking them, I would have made something different for a 9 and 12 year old, too. Even if they were an adventurous eater. And even if the lobsters were given to me.

It is a major sin of hosting to serve yourself the "good stuff" and your guests something lesser. If the grandparents didn't think that the girls would like lobster, then everybody should have gotten hot dogs.

We give the kids a choice. One granddaughter polished off half a filet mignon at 4 years old, and at 20 still chooses the filet, and one grandson at 12 honestly prefers a hamburger, or may even eat a jelly sandwich if I happen to think to offer him one.

Thipu1

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #728 on: April 28, 2013, 10:20:27 AM »
I had lobster for the first time when I was nine... and I've been hooked ever since!

My father did something similar to me.  He loved raw clams.  When I was four, he gave me my first and he always regretted it.  From that point on, I could eat raw clams as fast as he could shuck them. 

He should have figured it out.  When I was christened as an infant, one of the rituals involved putting a grain of salt on the baby's tongue.  Usually, the baby starts crying.  According to family lore, I just rolled it around in my mouth and looked rather pleased. 

Venus193

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #729 on: April 28, 2013, 01:19:44 PM »
I am a major fan of the crustacean...





VorFemme

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #730 on: April 28, 2013, 01:47:22 PM »
One brother is allergic to seafood - that's fine - Lil Sis and I will split his share!  But if either of us develops allergies.....we're in trouble.  Sweet & Sour Shrimp is not the same as Sweet & Sour Chicken or Pork - granted, all three are GOOD.  But Shrimp anything is better!
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I explain?

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #731 on: April 29, 2013, 06:30:11 AM »
In my FOO, seafood was a big part of the diet, being raised on the east coast and my maternal grandparents living right on a river where we could catch blue crabs and Granddaddy would go fishing.   And I think for about a year or so we lived in Florida and I'm told I ate raw oysters and loved them.  I still do, actually.  I can't think of a type of seafood I've tried and didn't like. 

My older two love crabs and seafood too, and the baby likes fish but hasn't had a chance to try crab just yet.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Slartibartfast

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #732 on: April 29, 2013, 07:21:14 AM »
Oddly enough, crab is the one food we've found that Bittybartfast won't eat - and she eats EVERYTHING.  Including horseradish, braunschwager, curry, green peppers, cilantro, and a whole host of other things many adults won't even eat.

SamiHami

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #733 on: April 29, 2013, 10:33:24 AM »
When I'm tired and grumpy, I always find myself thinking "Man, I'd pay 10% more if I could only find all this stuff under one roof."

I'm like this, nowadays, too.  DH and I waited a few weeks until we had two 20% off coupons for BB&B so we could buy two sets of service for 8 flatware and save $40.  However, I didn't think to also bring in the 10% off coupon we had, and we also purchased some napkins and placemats at full price.  I thought about it briefly, realized that BB&B is nowhere we are normally and figured it wasn't worth saving about $2 to have to make another trip out there when, really, we'd been to BB&B around 3-4 times since we got together 4+ years ago.

However, years ago, I used to be the person who would do whatever I could to save money and spent lots of time "chasing the sales."  It really wore me out though.  I don't have the time or patience now (still want to save money, but I'm fine with paying a little more if everything I need is at one or two locations).  Still, for our wedding, I checked the cost of renting vs. purchasing several things, like table linens and chair covers and found, for most things, it was cheaper to buy what we needed.  We now have things like 100 chair covers (about 20 brand-new) and 100 chair sashes, but, sadly it would've cost us more to rent them.  I figure we'll try to sell them at some point, but I certainly wasn't going to pay more to rent them and have nothing to show for it at the end (we won't be giving them away either because we did pay something for them so I want to recoup some of our expenses).

This isn't quite a cheapskate story (unless the shop owner was the one to tell it), but my and DH's engagement and wedding rings, altogether, cost us around $300.  Neither of us are into jewelry, and I saw no point in spending lots of money on something, while meaningful in its symbolism, means nothing to me as far as precious metals are concerned.  The store owner, when we ordered our wedding bands, kept making cracks about us calling him to "upgrade" our rings to gold in a few years when we could afford it.  I finally got annoyed enough to shut him down and tell him, "I don't care about jewelry so this as good as it's going to get.  I received as my 'engagement gift' a nice car that I really needed, which is what I told DH I wanted, is parked outside and suits me much better."  Stupid man shut up but also cost himself any future business from us for intimating we were cheap or penniless or both (it was an Irish store, not a jewelry store -- we were ordering Celtic wedding bands from Ireland).  For the record (which I didn't tell the stupid man), DH wanted to buy me an expensive (for us) engagement ring.  I turned him down and said that if wanted to get me something "big" to get me a car as it was much more practical and something I needed...so he got me a car (I pointed out I couldn't very well drive a ring and would feel stupid riding around in public transportation because I couldn't afford a car yet was sporting an expensive ring).

This might be cheapskate, but honestly I don't care. When we got engaged decades ago DH wanted me to help pick out my engagement ring (smart man...he figured since I'm the one who has to wear it forever I should have some input!). We looked around a lot of places, and of course being young and not exactly rich couldn't afford a lot, not that I was demanding anything. One store he took me to was a pawn shop, where I actually got a really nice diamond solitaire for an excellent price. It was twice the size of other stones in regular retail jewelry stores. I have had it appraised for insurance purposes and we got an excellent deal. I thought I'd feel weird about wearing a "used" ring, but you know what? It was new to me, and I've been wearing it for 27 years now.

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RobinduBois

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #734 on: April 29, 2013, 10:47:53 AM »
This is a slight digression, but still relevant to this thread.  At one point in the film Gangs of New York, Leonardo DiCaprio's character happily ignores a variety of insults thrown at him, but gets into a fist-fight with a man who calls him a "chiseler".  Since this word is not well-known in British English, I'm not clear exactly how rude it is considered.  Is it a term that wouldn't be used in polite society, or is it simply a synonym for "cheapskate" (which I would consider relatively mild)?

Thanks,

Robin